Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

older | 1 | .... | 6096 | 6097 | (Page 6098) | 6099 | 6100 | .... | 6176 | newer

    0 0


    Join me and special guest expert Emma as we discuss how hygienic the Roman baths really were. Did they help or hinder disease?

    Plenty of gruesome detail, so, leave till after lunch. 

    Music by Brakhage (Le Vrai Instrumental)


    Check out this episode!


    0 0

    Lessico dei Grammatici Greci Antichi
    Diretto da Franco Montanari
    Co-direttori: Fausto Montana, Lara Pagani

    Il LESSICO DEI GRAMMATICI GRECI ANTICHI (LGGA) rappresenta uno strumento di consultazione di base online, in particolare per le ricerche sulla storia della filologia, della grammatica e dell’erudizione nel mondo greco antico.
    Il progetto si è concretizzato nella progressiva pubblicazione su questo sito, aperto nel 2002, di schede relative ai personaggi a vario titolo rilevanti per l’esegesi e la ricerca erudita e filologico - grammaticale nel mondo antico.Il repertorio delle figure prese in considerazione si è gradualmente accresciuto fino ad arrivare a più di 570, così come la quantità di schede presenti e disponibili per il download in pdf, giunte a superare le 300.
    A partire da novembre del 2015, LGGA è pubblicato dall’editore Brill con il nome di Lexicon of Greek Grammarians of Antiquity

    Il nuovo sito pubblica inizialmente tutte le schede che già erano disponibili sul sito Aristarchus, affiancando la corrispondente versione inglese in un primo momento solo ad alcune di esse. Nel corso del tempo, ognuna delle schede esistenti sarà aggiornata e corredata di traduzione in inglese e saranno inoltre aggiunte le schede che attualmente restano ancora da redigere.Come in passato, ogni scheda è costituita da:

    1. una voce enciclopedica sul grammatico;
    2. elenco e testi di testimonianze antiche e frammenti;
    3. bibliografia.
    Rispetto alla versione precedente, sono adesso possibili ricerche molto più raffinate (p.es.per epoca del grammatico e per contenuto dei frammenti) e la fruizione delle schede è resa più efficace dalla presenza di numerosi collegamenti ipertestuali verso altre schede di LGGA o siti diversi(p.es.repertori di testi antichi oppure opere di riferimento).
    The LESSICO DEI GRAMMATICI GRECI ANTICHI (LGGA) represents an online reference tool, specifically dedicated to the field of ancient Greek philology, grammar and scholarship.
    This website, which was opened in 2002, has seen the in-progress publication of cards regarding figures who are relevant, from various points of view, for exegesis as well as erudite and philological-grammatical research in the ancient world. The list of figures taken into consideration has progressively increased up to a total amount of more than 570. The cards available for downloading are now over 300.

    Starting from November 2015, LGGA is published by Brill under the name of Lexicon of Greek Grammarians of Antiquity
     
    The new web site publishes initially all the cards that were available on Aristarchus, for some of which the corresponding English version will be made available immediately. Over time each card will be updated and supplied with an English translation. In addition, the cards not yet included will be progressively added. As in the past, each card is made up of:

    1. an encyclopedic entry with discussion of biographical data and works/fragments of the grammarian;
    2. ist and texts of ancient witnesses;
    3. bibliography.
    In comparison with the previous version, far more refined searches are now possible (e. g. on the basis of chronology of the grammarians or the content of the fragments) and the cards are easier to use thanks to the addition of many cross-references both to other LGGA cards and to different web sites (e. g. repertories of ancient texts or reference works).

    0 0

    Op dinsdag 4 december organiseert de afdeling Egyptologie van de KU Leuven de 21ste ‘Jan Quaegebeur lecture’, die dit jaar wordt gepresenteerd door Pierre Tallet, hoogleraar Egyptologie aan de Sorbonne in Parijs. In zijn lezing ‘Wadi el-Jarf: The harbour of king Khufu on the Red Sea Shore and its papyrus archive’ bespreekt hij de recente ontdekkingen in Wadi el-Jarf aan de Rode Zee. De lezing vindt plaats om 20u aan de Faculteit Letteren. Meer info op www.arts.kuleuven.be.


    0 0

    BURGOS, SPAIN—Science News reports that stone tools unearthed in Algeria amid butchered animal bones suggest the evolution of human ancestors was not limited to East Africa.

    Mohamed Sahnouni of Spain’s National Research Center for Human Evolution and his colleagues say meat-chopping tools found in North Africa were made about 2.4 million years ago, or about 200,000 years more recently than the oldest known tools in East Africa.

    The scientists think the tools could have been crafted by descendants of East African toolmakers who migrated into North Africa, or they may have been created independently. The animal bones came from savanna-dwellers such as elephants, horses, rhinoceroses, antelopes, and crocodiles that may have been hunted or scavenged from carnovores’ fresh kill sites, Sahnouni said.

    No hominin remains were found with the tools, so the researchers are not sure who made them. To read about early remains of modern humans discovered in Morocco, go to “Homo sapiens, Earlier Still.”

    0 0

    Cosmos Magazine reports that a team of researchers led by Xiaoling Zhang of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has unearthed a 30,000-year-old stone tool workshop in central Tibet—some 15,000 feet above sea level.

    Evidence from the site, known as Nwya Devu, suggests humans were able to survive at the area's extremely high altitude at least 15,000 years earlier than previously thought. The researchers suspect the toolmakers were hunters who followed herds of gazelles, horses, yaks, and maybe even woolly rhinoceroses to the Tibetan Plateau, and speculate that Denisovan genetic material may have contributed to their ability to adapt to the harsh environment.

    The types of tool technologies at the site also point to interactions between early Tibetans and people living in Siberia and Mongolia. To read in-depth about research into people's ability to live at high altitude, go to “The Heights We Go To.”

    0 0

    Paleolithic cave art in Turkey, Spain, France, and Germany, may represent star constellations, according to a News.com.au report.

    Martin Sweatman of the University of Edinburgh and his colleagues compared images in the caves, previously thought to be abstract animal symbols, with computer-estimated positions of the stars in the night sky at the time each cave’s artwork was made, based upon dating of the paints.

    They found that the abstract images may have been used as a method for keeping track of dates, Sweatman said, by noting the position of the stars in the night sky. This knowledge could also have been used to navigate the open seas, he added.

    Some of the images, such as the Lascaux Shaft Scene in France, which depicts a dying man and several animals, may even record comet strikes. For more, go to “The First Artists.”

    0 0


    A game called “58 Holes” or “Hounds and Jackals” is believed to have been invented in Egypt 4,200 years ago, becoming increasingly popular over the next centuries, and ultimately fading away some 3,650 years ago. But before its popularity dropped, it reached other parts of the world, such as Mesopotamia and Persia, where it also became pretty common.

    At least 68 gameboards of 58 Holes have been found archaeologically, including examples from ancient cities such as Babylon, Ur, and Thebes. Archaeologist Walter Crist had been looking for examples of the game in the Azerbaijan area (which lies in the Caspian, a former USSR region).

    He got lucky when he found a photograph in an Azerbaijani online magazine. He had a contact in the country and arranged to visit the country in April 2018. His luck, however, took a turn for the worse: the site had been scrapped by bulldozers to develop a residential neighborhood. Thankfully, a science official learned of the situation and informed Crist about another similar pattern.

    The archaeologist traveled to the new site and indeed found another board game sketched on the inside of a Bronze Age rock shelter that dated to approximately 4,000 years ago. Although precise dating has not been carried out, the archaeological context strongly suggests this approximate time frame.

    In the game, the two players are each presented with five pegs and dice. They have to reach a common end-point finish by moving their pieces along their respective tracks had to reach the finish, a common end-point, by moving their pieces along their respective tracks.

    The “Hounds and Jackals” name comes from decorative shapes of the heads of playing pins found in Egyptian sites, where one player’s pins would be sculpted in the shape of a hound, whereas the other player would have jackals.

    The pegs found at some archaeological sites were made of valuable materials such as gold, silver, or ivory. Of course, most versions would have featured simpler pegs made from wood, but these would have perished by now.


    0 0

    James Whitbrook wrote the following about the Doctor Who episode “It Takes You Away”: It was weird. And lovely? And messed up. And weird. It might be the most out-there episode of Doctor Who ever made, one that extrapolates some of the show’s key ideals (especially the one of finding beauty in the surreal and weird vastness of […]

    0 0

    umbo (m. pl. umbones)

    Shield boss. Livy 9.41.18; Amm. 16.12.37. [Bishop and Coulston 2006]


    0 0

    utere felix (Phr.)

    Literally ‘use luckily’ (or ‘happily’). Motto found on a variety of artefacts, including military equipment. CIL XV, 7164. [Bishop & Coulston 2006]


    0 0

    vacatio munerum (f. pl. n/a)

    Exemption from fatigues, granted to an immunis. Dig. 50.6.7; Tac., Hist. 1.46. See also opera vacantes [Goldsworthy 2003]


    0 0

    The Syrian authorities recovered several artefacts that were stolen inside the Daraa province over the last six years, state-owned news reported this morning. Credit: SANA (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); According to the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA), the local authorities in Daraa confiscated 103 stolen archaeological pieces from a home in the Daraa Governorate town of Al-Jiza on Monday. Credit:...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Egyptologists and archaeologists specialising in Egypt do not often talk about the clothes worn by ancient Egyptians. This topic is still poorly researched - scientists have long neglected it and focused on other aspects of this civilization, despite the fact that a lot of fabrics have survived to our times. Credit: Dr. Aleksandra HallmannEgyptologist Dr. Aleksandra Hallmann from the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures of...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Contrary to most of Jordan’s historical sites dating back to the medieval period, the recent discovery by one Jordanian farmer in Shobak, south of Jordan, is actually not a medieval military building. The discovered building’s courtyard [Credit: Al Rai]Most of the uncovered historical sites from that period are castles, barracks and forts, but this exception stands out as an oddity among a handful of buildings constructed in Jordan...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Sewerage works in Muro Leccese, a small town in the province of Lecce, in the Apulia region of south-east Italy, led to the discovery of an intact Messapian tomb containing the remains of several children and their funerary goods. Credit: Salento ArcheologicoAccording to archaeologists Oda Calvaruso and Francesco Meo from the University of Salento, the tomb dates from the Hellenistic period, between the fourth and third centuries...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Burnt food remains are very often found in pots from archaeological sites. Analyzing their protein content, helps us to understand many aspects of life in antiquity. The Mass Spectrometry Facility at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) in Dresden was approached by scientists from the State of the Brandenburg Authorities for Heritage Management and Archaeological State Museum (BLDAM) to analyze a...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    When a population grows quickly and farms intensively, the environment often suffers. This is not only true today, but was also the case as early as Roman times. Evidence of this has been found by Eawag researchers in sediments in Lake Murten. Reconstruction of the city of Aventicum on Lake Murten, former capital of Roman Switzerland. The picture is taken from the book “Aventicum — A Roman Capital City” by Daniel Castella et al...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Archaeologists made a sensational discovery during the excavations in the preliminary stages of the planned construction measures in the controversial new development area "Vor dem Lützelberg" in the northen Mittelbuchen district of Hanau, in the German state of Hesse. They came across a grave site that is probably 5,000 years old. The people buried there lived at the time of the so-called Bell Beaker Culture. Credit: © Bien-Ries...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Excavations carried ahead of the Pinczow bypass in southern Poland revealed two burials of the so-called Early Bronze Age Mierzanowice culture, dating to about 2,000 BC. Early Bronze Age grave found in Pinczow [Credit: Agata Chrobot] (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); The first grave contained the skeleton of a man, five clay vessels (two almost whole, three broken), and five arrowheads. It is unclear at present...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


    0 0

    Israeli researchers say an inscription on an ancient ring discovered near Jerusalem may include the name of Pontius Pilate, the Roman official who Biblical accounts say sentenced Jesus to death. The ring bearing the name of Pontius Pilate was found at Herodium, an archaeological site near Jerusalem and Bethlehem in the Israeli-occupied West Bank [Credit: Menahem Kahana/AFP]It would be a rare example still in existence of an...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


older | 1 | .... | 6096 | 6097 | (Page 6098) | 6099 | 6100 | .... | 6176 | newer