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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

older | 1 | .... | 6116 | 6117 | (Page 6118) | 6119 | 6120 | .... | 6176 | newer

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    Tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog vereiste de bouw en het onderhoud van het westelijk front in Noordwest-Europa enorme hoeveelheden hout. Hoewel bij archeologisch onderzoek geregeld houten structuren en voorwerpen worden blootgelegd, was tot nu toe nog maar weinig geweten over de herkomst van dit hout. Uit nieuw onderzoek van Kristof Haneca (agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed) blijkt dat het gebruikte hout vooral afkomstig was van snelgroeiende Europese boomsoorten, maar er is ook bewijs voor de invoer van Noord-Amerikaans hout. Haneca en zijn collega’s publiceerden de resultaten van hun onderzoek in het nieuwe nummer van het wetenschappelijk tijdschrift Antiquity. 

    Lees het volledige artikel: Timber for the trenches: a new perspective on archaeological wood from First World War trenches in Flanders Fields


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    The shattered skull of a hunter who lived about 8,000 years ago isn’t evidence of cannibalism, as...

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    Syrians for Heritage (SIMAT) 

    سوريون من أجل التراث (سمات)


    Syrians for Heritage (SIMAT) is a cultural association that strives to preserve the Syrian heritage for all Syrians and for the world. Through our tangible and intangible heritage, we can comprehend our past and anticipate our future. This understanding will help us rediscover our plurality, restore our sense of belonging to our land and country, and achieve our hoped-for, peaceful future.
    SIMAT is an inclusive association. It insists on broadening the discourse on Syrian heritage to encompass diverse perspectives, including those that have historically been excluded for a variety of reasons. SIMAT engages civil society in Syria and the Syrian diaspora and collaborates with concerned international organizations in the service of heritage education, exhibition, and conservation. SIMAT aims to challenge intended and unintended infringements on and appropriation of Syrian art, culture, and architecture, and promotes the study and appreciation of Syrian heritage locally and internationally for all.


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    This past semester, my extracurricular reading was focused around two topics. First, I read a good bit on time in archaeology, and, more recently, I’ve been reading about in the world of Historical archaeology.  In January, I will officially start writing a book on the archaeology of contemporary American culture and my introduction will think about both time (and what it means to be contemporary) and the tradition of historical archaeology in the U.S.

    The challenge for me is that while I do read in historical archaeology, I tend not to read very systematically and as a result, I don’t necessarily have a feeling for the scope or even big-picture direction of the field. Over the past few months, then I’ve turned my attention to various surveys and textbooks in the field. Starting with Barbara Little’s little book Historical Archaeology: Why the Past Matters, enjoying Mark Leone’s Critical Historical ArchaeologyCharles Orser’s Historical Archaeology, as well as various big edited volumes like the Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology, Hall and Silliman’s Historical Archaeology, and the Encyclopedia of Historical Archaeology and the massive series from Springer, Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology and University Press of Florida, The American Experience in an Archaeological Perspective. The volumes of the journals Historical Archaeology and the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, likewise produce useful guides to the field. 

    In part, my goal is to feel along the edges of world archaeology and American archaeology and determine the lines of influence and coincidence and departure. For the history of the archaeology of the contemporary world seems to proceed along two interrelated but separate lines: one in the U.S. and the other in Europe. While the historical reasons for these separate lines of development are a mix of historical experience – particularly the archaeological responses to post war reconstruction of European cities – and the different traditions of historical archaeology practiced in both contexts. 

    In general, this stuff is pretty exciting and it reminds me reading for my comprehensive exams as work to balance between the intriguing character and arguments of individual works and the need to read “for work” and to come away with a broader perspective on the field without losing nuance. More than that, I’m working on re-learning how to read efficiently and to re-hone some professional practices developed in graduate school and then left neglected in the face of professional realities that tend to require on depth rather than breadth. 


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  • 12/12/18--08:27: --none--
  • GLOSSING FROM A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
    Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany, 6–7 June 2019
    Call for Papers
    Glossing, the practice of annotating manuscripts between the lines and/or in the margins, was a widespread cultural practice wherever texts were being written, read, studied, and taught.
    This event follows on from another held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, on 21–22 June 2018. Like the previous event, this two-day conference aims to bring together specialists from a large variety of fields to discuss aspects of glossing—in all its forms—from a comparative perspective. The organizing Network for the Study of Glossing (http://www.glossing.org/) connects scholars of glossing phenomena in a wide range of languages currently including Arabic, Breton, Chinese, German, Greek, Egyptian, English, French, Hebrew, Hittite, Irish, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Norse, Sanskrit, Syriac, Turkish, and Welsh.
    We welcome participation from any researcher with an interest in glossing and related practices— regardless of language, region, or period. This includes possible themes such as glosses as discourse, glossing as evidence for reading strategies, glossing and translation, glossing scripture, glossing the law, commentary & transmission, glossing systems, editing glosses, and the comparison of crosscultural glossing practices.
    A particular focus this time will be the way in which glosses are defined within the different traditions, what terminology is used to describe them and their functions, and, finally, the question whether a common terminology and typology could be developed to describe glossing traditions in general. It is envisaged that several sessions on the second day of the conference will be dedicated to this particular theme.
    Papers should last 20 minutes, allowing 10 minutes for discussion. Papers and abstracts can be delivered in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish, as long as a handout or PowerPoint presentation is provided in English.
    Please send a title and abstract (250 words max) to Alderik Blom (blom@staff.uni-marburg.de)
    by 15 January 2019.

    Some limited financial assistance for travel and accommodation will be available.

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    [First posted in AWOL 20 April 2017, updated 12 December 2018]

    Heritage for Peace: Damage Newsletter

    http://www.heritageforpeace.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/1H4P-980x130.jpg
    Heritage for Peace is a non-profit organization whose mission is to support all Syrians in their efforts to protect and safeguard Syria’s cultural heritage during the armed conflict.
    As an international group of heritage workers we believe that cultural heritage, and the protection thereof, can be used as a common ground for dialogue and therefore as a tool to enhance peace. We call on all Syrians of any religion or ethnicity to enter into a dialogue and work together to safeguard their mutual heritage.

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      What might be passed over as two oddly shaped rocks are the work of Stone Age artisans who sculpted...

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      Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts

      Cover for Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts

      Authors

      Arnulf Hausleiter (ed)
      Ricardo Eichmann (ed)
      Muhammad al-Najem (ed)
      Arnulf Hausleiter; Ricardo Eichmann; Muhammad al-Najem; Ariel M. Bagg; Helmut Brückner; Michèle Dinies; Max Engel; Peter Frenzel; Andreas Ginau; Matthias Grottker; Benjamin Heemeier; Patrick Keilholz; Nicole Klasen; Harald Kürschner; Reinder Neef; Arno Patzelt; Martin Patzke; Anna Pint; Gunnar Sperveslage; Peter Voß; Kai Wellbrock

      Synopsis

      The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy-analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

      Chapters

      • Foreword - Introduction - Preface
      • The Archaeological Exploration of the Oasis of Taymāʾ
        Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann
      • Palaeoenvironmental Changes at Taymāʾ as Inferred from Sabkha Infill
        Max Engel, Nicole Klasen, Andreas Ginau, Martin Patzke, Anna Pint, Peter Frenzel, Helmut Brückner
      • Taymāʾ Oasis (Saudi Arabia) and its Surroundings – a First Synthesis of the Flora, Vegetation, Natural Resources, and Floral History
        Harald Kürschner, Reinder Neef
      • Early to Middle Holocene Vegetational Development, Climatic Conditions and Oasis Cultivation in Taymāʾ: First Results from Pollen Spectra out of a Sabkha
        Michèle Dinies, Reinder Neef, Harald Kürschner
      • The Water Management of Taymāʾ and Other Ancient Oasis Settlements in the North-Western Arabian Peninsula – a Synthesis
        Kai Wellbrock, Peter Voß, Benjamin Heemeier, Patrick Keilholz, Arno Patzelt, Matthias Grottker
      • Ägypten und Arabien
        Gunnar Sperveslage
      • Untersuchungen zu den ‘arabischen’ Toponymen und zur Rezeption der ‘Araber’ in den historischen Quellen der Assyrer
        Ariel M. Bagg


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      Faience Material from the Samos Heraion Excavations

      Cover for Faience Material from the Samos Heraion Excavations

      Authors

      Virginia Webb

      Synopsis

      The Heraion on Samos has been known since excavations began in the early nineteen hundreds as the findplace of exotic and unusual objects for the goddess Hera, brought from regions outside Greek lands, both East and West, dedicated in the sanctuary and finally buried in deposits of ex-votos. This long awaited study of the objects made of faience complements previous major studies in the Samos series on Cypriot limestones and terracottas (Schmidt) and Egyptian and Near Eastern bronzes (Jantzen) to which we should add Near Eastern and Egyptian ivories (Freyer-Schauenburg) published by the University of Hamburg.

      Faience is a colourful and attractive material used for both perfume vessels, figurines, and amulets, but its manufacture is alien to Archaic Greece. Thus it forms part of the interchange of imported technologies and styles which characterises the Orientalising movement in Greece, and it illuminates new routes of contact between Greece and the old world of Egypt and the Near East. Faience objects of unmistakable Egyptian origin come from the Heraion (though they are in the minority). But the greatest number are those which belong to the first two phases of the faience industry, established in East Greece in the second half of the seventh century: in particular they include a large body of figurines which clearly reference foreign cult. The strongest influence on these faience objects comes from the Egyptian sphere, although the exact path this took is still unclear, and other probably Near Eastern influences are also detectable. Samos has already yielded a large number of high quality Egyptian bronzes of XXV/XXVIth Dynasty date, which are the subject of much discussion as to their purpose and dedication. Virginia Webb has an unrivalled knowledge of the


      faience objects and their context in the East Greek and Egyptian worlds and this book promises to expand our knowledge of this important but up to now little known aspect of the foreign dedications in the Heraion.

      Chapters

      • 1 General Introduction
        Faience in Egypt – Faience and Other Materials Found in the Heraion on Samos
      • 2 Egyptianizing Workshops in East Greece
        The »Low Relief« Style with Incised Figure Decoration – »Leopard Spot Group«: Vases in Form of a Kneeling Figure – Disparate Groups: Vases in Form of Kneeling Woman With Baby at Back and Ibex on Lap – Varia
      • 3 Genuine Egyptian Fabrics
        Decorated or Plastic Vases for Oil, Nile Water or Kohl – Amulets and Talismans – Ornaments and Jewellery – Varia
      • 4 Egyptian Blue
        History of the Material – The Material and Technique – History of Its Use – Finds at the Heraion – Vessels – Scarabs – Amulet – Conclusion
      • 5 Human Figurines: Greco-Egyptian Workshops
        Statuettes in Human Form – Identity of Figurines – Faience as a Material for Small Scale Statues in Egypt – Male Figures without Attributes – Male Figures with Offerings or Playing Instruments – Female Figures – Male and Female Seated, Side by Side – ...
      • 6 Animal Figurines: Greco-Egyptian Workshops
        Large Figurines on Stands, without Suspension Loops – Small Figurines on Stands, with Suspension Loops
      • 7 Falcon Figurines: Greco-Egyptian Workshops
        Large Figurines on Stands, without Suspension Loop – Small Figurines on Stands, with Suspension Loop
      • 8 Stone Figurines and Glazed Clay Vases
        Stone Figurines – Glazed Ware Vases
      • 9 Conclusions
        The Faience Corpus from the Samos Heraion
      • 10 Appendix
        List of Findplaces of Faience Objects in the Heraion – Indices – Abbreviations – Bibliography –Sources of Illustrations – Plates 1–43

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      Pequeña es la que se ha armado con la declaración de Quim Torra en las que manifiesta su preferencia por la vía eslovena a la independencia para lo que se merece. Pequeña porque nadie elige el modelo de guerra en un catálogo por correspondencia o en un menú:

      —Oiga, camarero, yo le he pedido una guerra de independencia eslovena, de diez días y con sesenta muertos. ¡Sesenta! Y esta guerra es croata, con veinte mil muertos y de cuatro años. ¿Pero, bueno, esto que es?

      Es tan simple que lo explica la introducción de la Guerra de los Diez Días en Wikipedia. La guerra de independencia de Eslovenia duró solo diez días por una carambola feliz que se da una vez entre un millón. Serbia firmó la paz con Eslovenia para concentrarse en la guerra simultánea de la independencia de Croacia. ¿Resultado de esta última? La independencia de Croacia, sí, pero al precio de unos 15.000 muertos croatas, 6.000 serbios, 700.000 desplazados y una cantidad difícil de calcular de odio y trauma que se prolongará por espacio de una o dos generaciones. Una guerra civil de verdad, para entendernos.

      Como Quim Torra sabe perfectamente, hay que estar muy loco para confiar en que a Cataluña la secundará en la insurrección cualquier otra comunidad autónoma… Muy loco para soñar que Madrid firmará en diez días la paz con Barcelona para conservar Castellón y Palma, por poner un ejemplo. Como lo sabe, Quim Torra en realidad no ha proclamado a los cuatro vientos que es partidario de la vía eslovena a la independencia. Ha dicho que para él la independencia de Cataluña vale el precio de una guerra civil aquí y ya. Una guerra civil —pides una eslovena y te ponen una croata, que hi farem?— de 20.000 muertos y cuatro años, por ejemplo. En aplicación del imperativo categórico doy por hecho que contempla entre las pérdidas asumibles la vida de su hijo, y la vida de una de sus hijas o de ambas, ya que le parece asumible la muerte de los hijos de otros.

      Y en medio de tanta miseria moral los medios manipulando como quien no juega con fuego. Titula eldiario.es que «La oposición carga contra Quim Torra por reivindicar la vía eslovena sin tener en cuenta que hubo muertos». ¿De dónde saca el diario que no lo tuvo en cuenta? Es inverosímil que un nacionalista no conozca los datos más notorios de la independencia con la que sueña, ni la causa de su estrafalaria levedad. Así que, ¿cómo un medio que se presume serio lleva una presunción exculpatoria tan burda a un titular? Y por el otro lado, y al mismo tiempo, titula El Mundo que «Cristina Pardo se disculpa por el “repugnante” reportaje de La Sexta sobre los votantes de Vox de Marinaleda». Se disculpa la periodista por identificar en un reportaje a los votantes que odian sus oyentes, como quien dibuja una diana en sus cabezas, sí, pero el adjetivo «repugnante» entrecomillado no pertenece a la disculpa, como afirma más que sugiere el titular, sino a la acusación que dirigieron los representantes de Vox a la periodista. Pero todo es bueno para el convento.

      No doy estopa a un medio de la izquierda y a otro de la derecha al mismo tiempo porque sea un equidistante profesional. Muchas veces la verdad está en un extremo, sin paliativos. Sino porque las guerras civiles se evitan cuando los que habitan el centro mantienen la cordura y se unen contra las pulsiones asesinas —y lo que es lo mismo, suicidas— de quienes habitan los extremos. Cuando cada uno disculpa a sus manipuladores solo porque son suyos («Es un hijo de puta, pero es nuestro hijo de puta») el camino al desastre está servido. «Guerra civil» son palabras mayores que se evitan hablando de la Cataluña de hoy, porque dan pánico. Yo las digo en alto para que nos den mucho miedo y actuemos en consecuencia. Quim Torra, un incendiario, un loco peligroso.


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      Op de voorbije Archeologiedag van de provincie Antwerpen werd ook een nieuwe brochure voorgesteld, die een recente opgraving in Boechout belicht. Het onderzoek aan de Mussenhoevelaan biedt niet alleen een inkijk in een boerenerf uit de vroege ijzertijd. Vanaf de midden-ijzertijd werden op deze plek nabij de Rollebeek complexe grachtenstructuren aangelegd die eeuwenlang een rol zouden spelen in de dodenvieringen van de plaatselijke gemeenschap. In de Merovingsche periode tenslotte begroef een familie hier haar doden. De brochure geeft een overzicht van alle opgravingsresultaten en gaat dieper in op enkele vondsten.

      Deze gratis brochure is verkrijgbaar bij de dienst Erfgoed van de provincie Antwerpen via 03/240.64.14 of erfgoed@provincieantwerpen.be. Meer info over de brochurereeks vind je op www.provincieantwerpen.be.  


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      LONDON, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Telegraph, Neolithic cattle bones unearthed at 11 archaeological sites in the Balkans show wear and tear consistent with pulling heavy loads. The study, led by Jane Gaastra of University College London, suggests cattle were put to work as early as 6000 B.C., about 2,000 years earlier than previously thought and before the introduction of the plow and the wheel. Researchers think that, in the Balkans, cattle would have helped early farmers clear forests and build settlements. Gaastra says cattle in Britain may even have even helped build Stonehenge some 5,000 years ago, by dragging bluestones around 160 miles from Wales to Wiltshire. To read about the search for the genetic signature of aurochs, the wild ancestor of domesticated cattle, in medieval drinking horns, go to “Raise a Toast to the Aurochs.”


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      Russia Denisova CaveNOVOSIBIRSK, RUSSIA—The Siberian Times reports that a piece of hematite that may have been used for making reddish-brown marks between 50,000 and 45,000 years ago was discovered in Denisova Cave’s southern gallery. Mikhail Shunkov of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, in the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said the “pencil” may have been used by either the Denisovans or Neanderthals who inhabited the cave. “We cannot say how exactly it was used, but we believe it was for some artistic purpose,” Shunkov said. Similar implements have been unearthed at another Paleolithic site in the Altai Mountains, he added. Beads made of ivory and soapstone were also recovered at the site, along with a marble pebble bearing traces of ocher. To read about a girl with mixed Denisovan and Neanderthal heritage whose remains were found in Denisova Cave, go to “Hominin Hybrid.”


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      MANTAI, SRI LANKA—According to a Science Magazine report, researchers who analyzed soil samples collected at the site of the ancient port of Mantai on the island of Sri Lanka detected plant remains from around the world. Researchers found grains of locally grown rice, charred black pepper dating to between A.D. 600 and 700, and a single clove dating to between A.D. 900 and 1100. Archaeobotanist Eleanor Kingwell-Banham of University College London said spices are rarely found in the archaeological record because they were so valuable and were handled very carefully. The clove found by the researchers, for example, is thought to have traveled more than 4,000 miles from Indonesia. The team members also found wheat dated to between A.D. 100 and 200, and seeds from grapes harvested between A.D. 650 and 800. These crops would not have grown in Sri Lanka’s tropical climate, and are thought to have been imported from the Mediterranean world. Kingwell-Banham's team is currently studying chemical isotopes from the plants to help pinpoint the origins of the imported crops. For more on evidence of spices in the archaeological record, go to “The Neolithic Palate.”


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      KIEV, UKRAINE—Nadiia Kotova of the Institute of Archaeology at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and her team unearthed two carved rocks resembling snake heads at Kamyana Mohyla I, an archaeological site near the Sea of Azov in southern Ukraine, according to a Live Science report. Both of the carvings date to the Mesolithic period, although one is older than the other. Carved sometime between 8300 and 7500 B.C. from yellow sandstone, the first of the two snake heads weighs almost three pounds, and is triangular in shape with a flat bottom. Two eyes were carved on the stone’s upper surface near two knobs, and a long line for a mouth was carved near the flat edge. It was found near a fireplace, along with shells and flint tools. The smaller stone snake head, also found near a fireplace, weighs about one pound and was dated to around 7400 B.C. Kotova said this carving features a flattened, round shape and has a neck, eyes, and nose. “They were probably used during ceremonies,” Kotova explained. To read about the study of intricately carved stone balls that have been discovered throughout the British Isles, go to “Spheres of Influence.”


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      Why go on an archaeological excavation if you’re not an Archaeology major?
      Over the course of ten season we have had a variety of undergraduate majors join our archaeological excavation. Many come after taking an archaeology course with one of our staff members or friends of the project, having experienced archaeology in the classroom or having seen Indiana Jones perhaps a few too many times. Some of these students have already declared a major or minor in Archaeology, Classics, Art History, or some variation of these fields that clearly relate to the excavation of the Ancient World. Excavation is an obvious choice for these students, but we have also had pre-med students, business majors, engineers, and studio artists. Other than the experience, which we think is well worth it, what skills can non-majors gain from working at Gabii?
      Area G/H works together to fill out one of their first context sheets.
      An archaeological excavation is no small undertaking. Students are assigned to one of our excavation areas and work in groups of five to fifteen other students, supervised by professors and graduate students. For some this is not their first time excavating, some not even their first time at Gabii, they know some of what to expect and can handle the demanding environment. For others the changes of living in a new place and performing physical work in hot conditions takes some adjustment. As these new experiences are occurring you develop a strong sense of community and comradery with your trench mates. While we could assign each person their own small area to excavate, the process moves much faster when working together. In large deposits students team up: one pickaxes, one shovels, and another sorts through the finds in a wheelbarrow. Although people quickly develop preferences for what they enjoy most and what they excel in, a huge part of teamwork is equitable division of labor and we want to make sure that everyone can truly experience each of these elements of fieldwork.
      Similarly, the physical excavation is only a part of what occurs on an archaeological site. Throughout the season students are rotated through our finds, topography, botany, and zoology teams. In these specialized units they can see the post processing work that provides crucial information like dates, information on the ancient diet, and how we record everything that we have done. We strive to build understanding and foster respect for all the different tasks that occur in the field. As a part of this rotation, students learn how to effectively and succinctly communicate. All of the recording that is done in the field, primarily by students with their supervisor’s assistance, is available through our open source database. Students learn how to describe archaeological features, different soil textures, and the fine distinction between salmon and terracotta to name a few examples. 
      Part of the environmental rotation includes finding and
      identifying different types of ancient seeds.
      Throughout the course of the summer students are taught to pay attention to detail and to think critically about large scale processes that happened over the past three thousand year at the site of Gabii. From the very start volunteers take an active role in completing paperwork, beginning with learning how to describe what they see in archaeological terms, and ending in producing interpretations of the archaeology that become a part of Gabii record in our database and, eventually, our publications. In order to understand how ancient Gabines lived, we have to understand how different layers were deposited and what those different actions indicate. 
      Every new corner of Rome holds
      unexpected, beautiful surprises.
      Gabii is fortunately positioned to appeal to student’s sense of adventure. While excavating at Gabii, our students live in the eternal city itself, Rome. They call Trastevere, a vibrant neighborhood of Rome that is full of restaurants and shops, home for the five weeks of excavation. Trastevere is not the well-kept secret of Rome that it once was, but that does not detract from the area’s charm and has only improved public transit, making it easier for our students to get out and explore Rome and Italy on the weekends. For those who want to travel further afield, there is easy access to Rome’s train stations. Every year we have students who go to classics like Naples/Pompeii and Florence. Other great weekend getaways include Bologna, Ravenna, any Italian beach, and the hill towns of Tuscany (like Cortona, San Gimigiano, and Siena). Students interested in food, art, culture, history all find something to enjoy in Italy.
      Our alumni have gone on to work in a number of different fields (not just academia): for example, law, marketing, journalism, museum work, engineering, medicine, and social media. The critical thinking, communication, and teamwork skills developed while on excavation translate into any field or career path and the friendships built at Gabii carry on even after the summer ends. If you are considering what to do for this upcoming summer, consider joining the field team at Gabii, we look forward to meeting you. 
      In case you were wondering what the view in San Marino is like.
       I have a feeling this may be a stop on more lists for the 2019 summer.


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      via vicinaria (f. pl. viae vicinariae)

      A street between buildings, especially barracks. Literally ‘local street’. DMC 13. [Johnson 1983]


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      vicanus (m. pl. vicani)

      Inhabitant of a vicus. RIB 1700; 3503. [Goldsworthy 2003]


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      victimarius (m. pl. victimarii)

      An individual who dealt with sacrifical animals at sacrifices. CIL VI, 2385; XIII, 8292. [Goldsworthy 2003]


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      The Parthenon is one of the most famous and recognisable buildings in the world. Designed as a testimony to Athenian greatness, visible miles from the Acropolis (the citadel) on which it stands, the Parthenon still stands proudly among the remains of a massive complex of buildings that celebrated Athens’s deities. It is a witness to the lasting legacy of the ancient Greeks and their architectural ingenuity. But it is also a very good...

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