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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

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    Podcast 3.8: Jewish Followers of Jesus, part 2 – Pseudo-Clement (Download).


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    Podcast 3.9: Marcionites and the Unknown God (Download).


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    Podcast 3.10 Introducing Gnostic Worldviews (Download).


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    Podcast 3.11: Secret Book of John, part 1 – The Spiritual Realm (Download)


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    Podcast 3.12: Secret Book of John, part 2 – Salvation from the Material Realm (Download).


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    Podcast 3.13: The Wisdom of Jesus Christ and Middle Platonism (Download).


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    Podcast 3.14: The Gospel of Philip, part 1 – Ideas of Salvation (Download).


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    Podcast 3.15: The Gospel of Philip, part 2 – Ritual Enactments of Salvation (Download).


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    Podcast 3.16: The Gospel of Mary – Secret Knowledge from the Ultimate Disciple (Download)


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    OSLO, NORWAY—Science Nordic reports that researchers led by Svein Vatsvåg Nielsen of the University of Oslo’s Museum of Cultural History analyzed hundreds of radiocarbon-dated artifacts from archaeological sites across Norway in order to track changes in the country’s Late Neolithic population. Nielsen said the study identified an increase in human activity in eastern Norway some 6,000 years ago, which could signal the arrival of early farmers from the east. DNA analysis of human remains could reveal whether migrant farmers replaced the hunter-gatherers who lived there, he explained. Archaeologists usually track the spread of farming in the area with a certain type of stone ax, he added, because the preservation of artifacts in the region’s acidic soil is poor and it has been heavily plowed for centuries. The new study also supports the idea that Norway’s Late Neolithic farmers reverted to hunting, gathering, and fishing. Farming was eventually reintroduced during the Bronze Age. “The settlement pattern changes very clearly when we approach 5,300 years ago,” Nielsen said. “Coastal sites fall out of use, and long houses and grains begin to show up.” For more, go to “Letter from Norway: The Big Melt.”


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    Neanderthal skull shapeLEIPZIG, GERMANY—According to a Live Science report, paleoanthropologist Philipp Gunz of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology suggests that modern humans who inherited certain fragments of Neanderthal DNA may have more oblong brains and skulls than other modern humans. Gunz and his colleagues took computed tomography scans of seven Neanderthal skulls and 19 modern human skulls, then constructed imprints of the skulls’ braincases. They compared the shapes of these braincases with MRI scans of some 4,500 people whose genetic data was also known. The data indicates Neanderthal DNA fragments in modern human chromosomes 1 and 18, which are linked to brain development, may produce less round heads. However, as neurogeneticist Simon Fisher of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics clarified, “The effects of the Neanderthal gene variants are small, you would not be able to see them in a person’s head shape when you meet them.” For more, go to “Decoding Neanderthal Genetics.”


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    maize domestication processWASHINGTON, D.C.—According to a Science News report, the domestication of the corn plant began in southern Mexico some 9,000 years ago, and continued in Mexico and the southwestern Amazon for several thousand years. It had been previously thought that corn domestication was accomplished in southern Mexico relatively quickly. Logan Kistler of the Smithsonian Institution and his colleagues reconstructed the genetic history of the maize plant by analyzing and comparing the genomes of 108 varieties of modern maize, 11 samples taken from ancient maize remains, and one sample obtained from ancient teosinte, the wild ancestor of the modern maize plant. The study suggests that when the ancestor of modern maize was carried to South America from Mexico more than 6,500 years ago, it still carried many teosinte genes. Kistler suspects farmers in southwestern Amazonia continued the process of domestication by planting the partly domesticated maize with rice and cassava in soil that had been enriched with charcoal, compost, and other ingredients. To read about the ancient nutritional role of corn fungus in what is now Utah, go to “Eat More Spore.”


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    AUKLAND, NEW ZEALAND—The New Zealand Herald reports that The Daring, a two-masted schooner that wrecked on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand in 1865, has been lifted out of the sands intact. Members of the Classic Yacht Charitable Trust raised money to recover the vessel, which was just two years old when it was blown ashore by a storm. Security was in place around the clock to protect the site from scavengers. Once the sand was removed from the ship’s interior, the team recovered several nineteenth-century artifacts, including a leather shoe, coins, a cup, clay pipes, and wine bottle caps. The Daring was eventually loaded onto a truck, and hosed down by the Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade. Plans for the conservation of the ship are being finalized. To read about the oldest known intact shipwreck, which was recently discovered in the Black Sea and is one of ARCHAEOLOGY's Top 10 Discoveries of 2018, go to “Ancient Shipwreck.”


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    Along with Brexit, now the country officially states it is not part of any community with anyone but itself, Britain should amend the archaic British Museum Act of 1963.

    The act as a whole sanctions the BM hanging on to stuff they took from other countries that, in the days of colonialism, it forcefully impelled to become part of the community they called the 'British Empire'. That, thankfully, has all gone now leaving a bad taste in the mouth for some and a smug feeling of nostalgia among another group (and its pretty likely that a lot of that group with their myth of britishness are among the Leavers). As it is written, the Act prevents the Museum from officially doing the right thing and removing inappropriately appropriated artefacts from its collection, except in very exceptional – and rare – cases. The law only reinforces the atavistic social acceptance of Britain’s right to plundered artefacts, regardless of how they were taken (Ruqaya Izzidien, 'Stolen goods: Britain's museums must hand back colonial plunder' Middle East Eye 14 December 2018).



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    9781138125308.jpg

    Osman Umurhan, Juvenal's global awareness: circulation, connectivity, and empire, Londres-New York, 2017.

    Éditeur : Routledge
    Collection : Routledge monographs in classical studies
    vi, 190 pages
    ISBN : 9781138125308
    140 $

    In Juvenal's Global Awareness Osman Umurhan applies theories of globalization to an investigation of Juvenal's articulation and understanding of empire, imperialism and identity. Umurhan explains how the increased interconnectivity between different localities, ethnic and political, shapes Juvenal's view of Rome as in constant flux and motion. Theoretical and sociological notions of deterritorialization, time-space compression and the rhizome inform the satirist's language of mobility and his construction of space and place within second century Rome and its empire. The circulation of people, goods and ideas generated by processes of globalization facilitates Juvenal's negotiation of threats and changes to Roman institutions that include a wide array of topics, from representatios of the army and food to discussions of cannibalism and language. Umurhan's analysis stresses that Juvenalian satire itself is a rhizome in both function and form. This study is designed for audiences interested in Juvenal, empire and globalization under Rome.

     

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    Review of Jessica Schrader, Gespräche mit Göttern: Die poetologische Funktion kommunikativer Kultbilder bei Horaz, Tibull und Properz. Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge, 58. Stuttgart: 2017. Pp. 314. €54.00 (pb). ISBN 9783515117005.

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  • 12/15/18--01:58: When was Jesus born?
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