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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

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    Archaeologists made a unique discovery in the village of Hozelec near Poprad, in northern Slovakia. They have discovered various items from different time eras in a ground bank located in...

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    He was somewhere between the age of 17 and 25 when he died, apparently of natural causes. But for reasons that are unclear, a warrior's body found in Yorkshire (England)...

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    In a 5,000 year old grave outside Falköping (Sweden), scientists have found the oldest traces of the plague bacterium's DNA in the world. According to the researchers, this discovery may...

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    A pattern of small holes cut into the floor of an ancient rock shelter in Azerbaijan shows that one of the world's most ancient board games was played there by...

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    Archaeologists have found two oddly shaped rocks that are the work of Stone Age artisans who sculpted them into beady-eyed snake heads. "These sculptures could have ritual purpose," said study...

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    According to archaeologists, cave-dwellers used hematite crayon for art work in Altai Mountains - a mountain range where Russia, China, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan come together. The pre-historic artists were not...

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    [First posted in AWOL 4 August 2010, updated 19 December 2018]

    L’Annuaire du Collège de France
    ISSN électronique: 2109-9227

    http://annuaire-cdf.revues.org/images/sitedeco.png
    L’Annuaire du Collège de France(Cours et travaux du Collège de France) se fait chaque année le reflet de l’activité scientifique du Collège. Il contient notamment les résumés détaillés des cours et séminaires des professeurs, rédigés par leurs soins. Les professeurs honoraires y présentent leurs activités. On y trouve également les comptes rendus des travaux des laboratoires, instituts et équipes de recherche accueillies au Collège ; les résumés des conférences données par des chercheurs étrangers invités ; une brève histoire du Collège de France comprenant la succession des chaires depuis le début du XIXe siècle.

    La collection est publiée depuis 1901. En juillet 2010, l’édition imprimée se double de l'édition électronique. Huit numéros de l'Annuaire sont actuellement disponibles. Tous les volumes de la collection ont été numérisés et seront progressivement mis en ligne.
    And see the other periodicals from the Collège de France

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    [First posted in AWOL 20 April 2012. Updated 19 December 2018]

    Journal of Open Archaeology Data (JOAD)
    ISSN: 2049-1565

    https://openarchaeologydata.metajnl.com/static/images/header.png
    The Journal of Open Archaeology Data (JOAD) features peer reviewed data papers describing archaeology datasets with high reuse potential. We are working with a number of specialist and institutional data repositories to ensure that the associated data are professionally archived, preserved, and openly available. Equally importantly, the data and the papers are citable, and reuse will be tracked. While still in beta phase, the journal is now accepting papers. We will also be adding new functionality over the next few weeks, and refining the look and feel.

    Issue Archive



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     [First posted in AWOL 19 January 2012, updated, 19 December 2018]

    Database of Neo-Sumerian Texts (BDTNS)

    http://bdtns.filol.csic.es/extras/img/logo_BDTNS.gif

    The Database of Neo-Sumerian Texts (or BDTNS, its acronym in Spanish) is a searchable electronic corpus of Neo-Sumerian administrative cuneiform tablets dated to the 21st century B.C. During this period, the kings of the Third Dynasty of Ur built an empire in Mesopotamia managed by a complex bureaucracy that produced an unprecedented volume of written documentation. It is estimated that museums and private collections all over the world hold at least 120,000 cuneiform tablets from this period, to which should be added an indeterminate number of documents kept in the Iraq Museum.
           Consequently, BDTNS was conceived by Manuel Molina (CSIC) in order to manage this enormous amount of documentation. The project initially rested on two fundamental pillars. First, the boost given by Marcel Sigrist, who in 1996 put at M. Molina’s disposal his Ur III catalogue of more than 30,000 texts. Second, the bulk of Ur III transliterations prepared in 1993 by Remco de Maaijer and Bram Jagersma (Rijksuniversiteit, Leiden), made freely available on their website; over the years this material grew considerably and was made accessible to M. Molina in 2001 via the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative. All the transliterations in BDTNS based on that work are properly credited on their respective catalogue records.
           The work on BDTNS began, therefore, in 1996 at the Instituto de Filología (now Instituto de Lenguas y Culturas del Mediterráneo y Oriente Próximo) of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). Six years later, in 2002, it appeared online. In the same year, it began to be officially supported, thanks to two three-year research projects funded by the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología:
    • BFF2001-2319. “Digitization of the Neo-Sumerian corpus of administrative cuneiform tablets (c. 2100-2000 BC)”. PI: M. Molina. Host institution: CSIC. Funding: €84,909. Duration: From 2002/01/01 to 2004/12/31.
    • HUM2004-1516. “Digitization of the Neo-Sumerian corpus of administrative cuneiform tablets (c. 2100-2000 BC). Second part”. PI: M. Molina. Host institution: CSIC. Funding: €71,600. Duration: From 2005/01/01 to 2008/03/31.
    During all those years, and up to the present, BDTNS has collaborated closely with the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), led by Robert K. Englund (UCLA). It has also benefited from the material generously provided by several other scholars, particularly Marcel Sigrist (École Biblique et Archéologique Française, Jerusalem) and David I. Owen (Cornell University, Ithaca NY). Likewise, authors of new publications of Neo-Sumerian texts have regularly supplied digitized versions of their works that have greatly facilitated the update of BDTNS.


    BDTNS in Figures

    BDTNS currently provides searchable cataloguing data, transliterations, images, bibliography, collections, seal inscriptions and geotagged locations for more than 97,000 Neo-Sumerian administrative cuneiform documents. Part of this material remains unpublished, and access to it is strictly at its editor’s discretion.
           More specifically, the texts in BDTNS can be classified as follows (November, 2018):
    Published in handcopy and/or transliteration 63,815
    Published only in catalogue or in photographic form 22,642
    Auctioned 825
    Unpublished 7,960
    Total of texts in BDTNS 95,242

    Transliterations for most of the published texts, images, a catalogue of seal inscriptions, collections, a complete bibliography, and geotagged data about their provenience are also provided by BDTNS:
    Texts in transliteration 64,012 (99% of published and auctioned texts) + 769 (unpubl. texts)
    Lines in transliteration 1,156,400
    Texts with handcopy 31,431 (62.2% via CDLI)
    Texts with photograph 32,699 (85.4% by CDLI)
    Seal inscriptions 23,470
    Bibliographical references 159,088
    Bibliography 1,897 titles
    Collections 738 collections in
    39 different countries
    Provenience of the texts
    Umma 29,456 35.1%
    Girsu 27,212 32.5%
    Puzriš-Dagan 15,527 18.6%
    Ur 4,269 5.1%
    Nippur 3,417 4.1%
    GARšana 1,551 1.8%
    Irisagrig 1,150 1.4%
    Other 1,098 1.3%







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  • 12/19/18--14:03: From my diary
  • My apologies for the annoying pop-up that now appears on the right of the blog, touting ReCaptcha.  This is a little bit of market-position abuse from Google, who have forced their branding into the Contact Form that I have been using, and popped it up throughout my site (!).  I will find a way to make this disappear, given time.  How nice of google to steal part of my Christmas holidays and force their way onto my blog.  Google urgently needs to be broken up.

    I’ve received a whole bunch of translations of portions of Eusebius’ Commentary on the Psalms from Fr. Alban Justinus.  There is one more batch to go, then I will release the lot.

    The translation from the Latin of a life of St George is still in progress.  I have had no time to attend to it, and the translator has been in hospital.

    I’ve now finished for Christmas, thankfully – my current contract is hard work – and I hope to have time to attend to things.


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    Dobre, A. (2018) : Etnologia funerară tomitană (în sec. I-III  p. Chr.)], Tagu Mures [Ethnologie funéraire tomitaine (aux Ier-IIIe s. ap. J.-C.)]. L’ouvrage se présente comme une approche de la perception de la mort chez les Tomitains à l’époque romaine. … Lire la suite

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    San Diego mineWASHINGTON, D.C.—According to an Associated Press report, after a review of historic records and a remote underwater inspection of the wreckage of USS SanDiego, a team of scientists, archaeologists, and historians have concluded that the warship, which sank on July 19, 1918, struck an underwater mine planted off the coast of Long Island by a German submarine. Their analysis suggests the explosion did not occur inside the vessel, and the hole in the hull did not appear to have been caused by a torpedo strike. In addition, German records revealed that a submarine called U-156 was in the area at the time, planting explosives. The 500-foot-long San Diego was carrying nearly 3,000 tons of coal for a trip across the Atlantic Ocean when the explosion, which the commander described as feeling like a “dull heavy thud,” broke through an area of the hull that was only a half-inch thick. San Diego fired between 30 and 40 rounds in case a submarine was nearby, but it sank less than 30 minutes after it was struck. Most of the 1,100 sailors on board escaped to safety on life rafts and dinghies. To read about the discovery of the wreck of a long-lost ship that sank during World War II, go to “Finding Indianapolis.”


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    HALLE, GERMANY—According to a report in DW, evidence of fatal injuries has been verified on the 3,800-year-old bones of the so-called prince of Helmsdorf, whose remains were discovered in the Leubinger mound, where the Nebra Sky Disc was also found. Frank Ramsthaler of the University of Saarland Institute for Forensic Medicine said one of the wounds may have been inflicted through the prince’s stomach and into his spine with a dagger whose blade was at least six inches long. Ramsthaler thinks the victim may have been standing against a wall or lying on the floor when he was stabbed, since the injuries were inflicted with such intensity. Another wound was inflicted from above—it split the prince’s left shoulder blade and probably damaged his lungs. An arm injury suggests the prince may have tried to defend himself against a surprise attack. To read about evidence of murder discovered in bones unearthed in northern Spain and dating back 430,000 years ago, go to “A Place to Hide the Bodies.”


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    via Nikkei Asian Review, 08 December 2018:

    The post Restoration project reopens ‘best view in Yangon’ appeared first on SEAArch - Southeast Asian Archaeology.


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    During its work and field follow-up in the Si’a Hill archaeological site, the Sweida Antiquities Department unearthed an 80 cm-long and 40 cm-wide stone inscription in Greek. Credit: SANAHead of Sweida Antiquities Department Dr. Nashat Kiwan told SANA that the inscription was discovered in cooperation with the locals of the area and the preliminary analysis after reading the inscription suggests that it most likely belongs to the...

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    A newly-identified Recumbent Stone Circle has been recorded on a farm in Scotland's Aberdeenshire, in the parish of Leochel-Cushnie. The stone circle in Aberdeenshire has come to the attention of archaeologists for the first time - despite it being up to 4,500-years-old [Credit: Aberdeenshire Council]Despite being a complete stone circle that has obviously been known and respected by those who have farmed the area over the years, it...

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    Masked for centuries by the soot of candles and lately by scaffolding, the mosaics of Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity have been restored to their Crusader-era splendour in time for Christmas. Renovated mosaics and columns inside the Church of the Nativity in the occupied West Bank biblical city of Bethlehem [Credit: Thomas Coex, AFP]Over the past 15 months, experts have cleaned and repaired surviving fragments of the 12th century...

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    conference

    The organisers would like invite paper submissions for our session on "De-colonisation at EAA 25 years on: the social-economic contribution of cultural heritage conservation" at the 25th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Bern, Switzerland, 4-7 September 2019. 
    Session title:
    De-colonisation at EAA 25 years on: the social-economic contribution of cultural heritage conservation
    Session keywords:
    Conservation, De-colonisation, Repatriation, Archaeological science, Heritage management
    Session abstract:

    Location

    Name: 
    Dr. Evelyne Godfrey
    Call for Papers: 
    yes
    CFP Deadline: 
    February 14, 2019

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    December 20, 2018 09.45 -

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    via Bangkok Post, 15 December 2018: A friend from Unesco Bangkok pens this opinion piece about the inscription of the masked Khon dances from Cambodia and Thailand into the Intagible Cultural Heritage list.

    The post Intangible heritage stands up to scrutiny appeared first on SEAArch - Southeast Asian Archaeology.


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