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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia
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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/PgBZM5hLDgc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/1EMGgxGW5Yc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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  • 08/13/18--02:15: Magdala photo essay
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/4FenzHuje4w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    Sous la direction de Dominique GOGUEY et Jacky BENARD, 2018, 289 p. coul. (ISBN : 978-2-35518-082-8) avec le soutien scientifique (relevés LiDaR) et financier du G.I.P du futur Parc National des forêts de Champagne et Bourgogne. Une nouvelle publication des éditions Mergoil.

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/mG-tYTEMmxY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    I think that one of the most effective tools to combat the false notion that there are any genuine “biblical literalists” may be to ask people to imagine themselves into the world as the ancient authors of the Bible assumed it to be. Here is what I wrote on this topic recently while sharing a […]

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    Over the last year, I’ve been whispering about this project a bit. Kyle Conway is editing an updated version of The Williston Report: The Impact of Oil on the Williston Area of North Dakota (1958), and The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota will republish both original report and an updated slate of essays. The updated version will be titled Sixty Years of Boom and Bust The Impact of Oil in North Dakota, 1958–2018, and it will become a contributing volume to the Bakken Bookshelf and sit nice alongside The Bakken Goes Boom: Oil and the Changing Geographies of Western North Dakota (2016). 

    Campbell et al 1958 dragged

    If you’re interested in the original report, which anyone interested in North Dakota history should read. There’s a digital copy of the book available from The Digital Press’s page on the Internet Archive here (and if you’re interested in a paper copy one is available from Re-Ink Books in Delhi, India). 

    Kyle Conway has sent me a little peek at the table of contents for the new version of the book. It looks fantastic:

    I. INTRODUCTION

    1. Introduction: Sixty Years of Boom and Bust (2018), by Kyle Conway
    2. Introduction and Summary (1958), by Bernt L. Wills, Ross B. Talbot, Samuel C. Kelley, Jr., and Robert B. Campbell

    II. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
    3. Physical Attributes of the Area (1958), by Bernt L. Wills
    4. The Geographic Setting of the Bakken Oil Shale Play (2018), by Bradley C. Rundquist and Gregory S. Vandeberg 

    III. POLITICS
    5. Political Impact (1958), by Ross B. Talbot
    6. Political Impacts (2018), by Andrea Olive

    IV. ECONOMY
    7. The Economic Impact of Oil Development (1958), by Samuel C. Kelley, Jr.
    8. The Economic Consequences of Oil Development (2018), by David Flynn

    V. SOCIAL CHANGE
    9. Social Change in the Basin (1958), by Robert B. Campbell
    10. Social Impacts of Oil Development (2018), by Rick Ruddell and Heather Ray
    11. Making Home in the Bakken Oil Patch (2018), by William Caraher and Bret Weber
    12. Drinking, Drugs, and Long Waits: Community Members’ Perceptions of Living in a North Dakotan Boomtown (2018), by Karin L. Becker
    13. Boomtown Bias: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of North Dakota’s Commercial Sex Laws (2018), by Nikki Berg Burin

    VI. APPENDICES
    Appendix A: Methodology Note (1958)
    Appendix B: Supplementary Tables (1958)

    Kyle has also been playing around with the cover and grabbed a great photograph of Williston on his last visit to the area.

    SixtyYearsCoverDraft

    Ideally the book will drop toward the end of this year, but we’re probably dealing with the “long 2018” for this volume with an early 2019 publication date, but judging by the table of contents, I’m pretty sure that this book will be worth the wait.


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    [First posted in AWOL 14 October 2016, updated 13 August 2018]

    A Digital Corpus for Graeco-Arabic Studies

    Image result for A Digital Corpus for Graeco-Arabic Studies 

    Greek-Arabic translations

    Between the 8th and 10th centuries CE, hundreds of Greek philosophical, medical and scientific works were translated into Arabic. These translations helped shape the development of philosophy and science in the Islamic world. Through later Latin translations, they also exerted some influence in the Latin West. 

    Most importantly, Arabic translations were crucial for preserving, transmitting and extending ancient Greek thought: many Greek texts were lost in the intervening centuries and are now only extant in Arabic translation. The Arabic translators also had access to manuscripts that were often several centuries older and potentially closer to the Greek originals than those available to editors of ancient Greek texts today. 

    The Arabic translators’ understanding of their Greek sources was informed by their historical, cultural, religious and linguistic background. Their reading of these texts offers a new perspective on the ancient world that has the potential to enhance our own understanding.

    The Digital Corpus 

    The Digital Corpus assembles a wide range of Greek texts and their Arabic counterparts. It also includes a number of Arabic commentaries and important secondary sources. The texts in the corpus can be consulted individually or side by side with their translation. The majority of texts can also be downloaded for further analysis.
    • al-Fārābī
      • Fī qawānīn al-šiʿr The Canons of Poetry
    • al-Nayrīzī
      • Šarḥ kitāb al-Uṣūl li-Ūqlīdis (pt. 1) Commentary on Euclid's Elements
      • Šarḥ kitāb al-Uṣūl li-Ūqlīdis (pt. 2) Commentary on Euclid's Elements
      • Šarḥ kitāb al-Uṣūl li-Ūqlīdis (pt. 3) Commentary on Euclid's Elements
    • al-Ruhāwī
      • K. Adab al-ṭabīb Practical Ethics of the Physician
    • Alexander of Aphrodisias
      • De Intellectu et Intellecto On the Intellect
      • De Libero Arbitrio On Free Will
      • De Providentia On Providence
      • De Visu On Seeing
      • Quaestio I 11a: De Universalibus Problems and Solutions I 11a: On Universals
      • Quaestio I 2: De Colore Problems and Solutions I 2: On Colour
      • Quaestio I 5: De Auctu Problems and Solutions I 5: On Growth
      • Quaestio III 3: De Sensu Problems and Solutions III 3: On Sense Perception
    • Apollonius of Perga
      • Conica Conics
    • Aristotle
      • Analytica Posteriora Posterior Analytics
      • Analytica Priora Prior Analytics
      • Ars Poetica Poetics
      • Categoriae The Categories
      • De Anima On the Soul
      • De Divinatione per Somnum On Divination in Sleep
      • De Insomniis On Dreams
      • De Interpretatione On Interpretation
      • De Iuventute et Senectute, de Vita et Morte On Youth, Old Age, Life and Death
      • De Longitudine et Brevitate Vitae On Length and Shortness of Life
      • De Memoria et Reminiscentia On Memory
      • De Respiratione On Respiration
      • De Sensu et Sensibilibus Sense and Sensibilia
      • De Somno et Vigilia On Sleep
      • De Sophisticis Elenchis On Sophistical Refutations
      • Historia Animalium History of Animals
      • Meteorologica Meteorology
      • Topica Topics
    • Euclid
      • Elementa Elements
    • Galen
      • Ad Glauconem de Methodo Medendi Therapeutics to Glaucon
      • Adhortatio ad Artes Addiscendas Exhortation to the Arts
      • Adversus Eos qui de Typis Scripserunt Against Those who Write about Types
      • Adversus Julianum Against Julian
      • Adversus Lycum Against Lycus
      • An in Arteriis Natura Sanguis Contineatur On whether Blood is Naturally Contained in the Arteries
      • Ars Medica The Art of Medicine
      • Compendium Timaei Platonis Commentary on Plato's Timaeus
      • De Anatomicis Administrationibus I-IX,5 On Anatomical Procedures
      • De Anatomicis Administrationibus IX,6-XV On Anatomical Procedures
      • De Animi Cuiuslibet Peccatorum Dignotione et Curatione On the Diagnosis and Cure of the Errors of the Soul
      • De Antidotis On Antidotes
      • De Atra Bile On Black Bile
      • De Bonis Malisque Sucis On Good and Bad Juices
      • De Bono Habitu Good Condition
      • De Causis Contentivis On Containing Causes
      • De Causis Morborum Causes of Diseases
      • De Causis Pulsuum Causes of Pulses
      • De Causis Respirationis On the Causes of Breathing
      • De Comate Secundum Hippocratem On Coma According to Hippocrates
      • De Compositione Medicamentorum per Genera On the Composition of Drugs according to Kind
      • De Compositione Medicamentorum secundum Locos I-VI On the Composition of Drugs according to Places I-VI
      • De Compositione Medicamentorum secundum Locos VII-X On the Composition of Drugs according to Places VII-X
      • De Constitutione Artis Medicae ad Patrophilum On the Composition of the Art of Medicine
      • De Consuetudinibus On Habits
      • De Crisibus On Crises
      • De Curandi Ratione per Venae Sectionem On Treatment by Bloodletting
      • De Diebus Decretoriis On Critical Days
      • De Differentiis Pulsuum Differences of Pulses
      • De Difficultate Respirationis Difficulties in Breathing
      • De Dignoscendis Pulsibus Diagnosis by Pulses
      • De Dignotione ex Insomniis On Diagnosis from Dreams
      • De Elementis ex Hippocrate On the Elements According to Hippocrates
      • De Experientia Medica On Medical Experience
      • De Facultatibus Naturalibus On the Natural Faculties
      • De Febrium Differentiis On the Differences of Fevers
      • De Foetuum Formatione On the Formation of the Foetus
      • De Hirundinibus, Revulsione, Cucurbitula, Incisione et Scarificatione On Leeches, Revulsion, the Cupping Glass, Incision and Scarification
      • De Inaequali Intemperie On Uneven Distemper
      • De Instrumento Odoratus On the Organ of Smell
      • De Locis Affectis On Affected Parts
      • De Marcore On Marasmus
      • De Methodo Medendi On the Therapeutic Method
      • De Morborum Differentiis Differences of Diseases
      • De Morborum Temporibus Opportune Moments in Diseases
      • De Motu Musculorum On the Movement of Muscles
      • De Musculorum Dissectione ad Tirones On the Dissection of Muscles
      • De Nervorum Dissectione On the Anatomy of the Nerves
      • De Nominibus Medicinalibus On Medical Names
      • De Optima Corporis Nostri Constitutione The Best Constitution of our Bodies
      • De Optima Doctrina On the Best Method of Teaching
      • De Optimo Medico Cognoscendo On Recognizing the Best Physician
      • De Ossibus ad Tirones On Bones for Beginners
      • De Partibus Artis Medicativae On the Parts of the Art of Medicine
      • De Partium Homoeomerium Differentia On the Differences of Uniform Parts
      • De Parvae Pilae Exercitio Exercise with the Small Ball
      • De Placitis Hippocratis et Platonis On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato
      • De Plenitudine On Plethora
      • De Praenotione ad Epigenem On Prognosis
      • De Praesagitione ex Pulsibus Prognosis by Pulses
      • De Propriorum Animi Cuiuslibet Affectuum Dignotione et Curatione The Passions of the Soul
      • De Ptisana On Barley Soup
      • De Pulsibus ad Tirones On the Pulse for Beginners
      • De Purgantium Medicamentorum Facultate On the Power of Cleansing Drugs
      • De Sanitate Tuenda On the Preservation of Health
      • De Sectis ad eos qui introducuntur On Sects for Beginners
      • De Semine On Semen
      • De Septimestri Partu On the Seven-Month Child
      • De Simplicium Medicamentorum Facultatibus I-VI On the Powers of Simple Drugs I-VI
      • De Simplicium Medicamentorum Facultatibus VII-XI On the Powers of Simple Drugs VII-XI
      • De Sophismatibus penes Dictionem On Linguistic Sophisms
      • De Substantia Facultatum Naturalium On the Substance of the Natural Powers
      • De Symptomatum Causis Causes of Symptoms
      • De Symptomatum Differentiis Differences of Symptoms
      • De Temperamentis On Mixtures
      • De Theriaca ad Pisonem On Theriac to Piso
      • De Totius Morbi Temporibus Opportune Moments in Diseases as a Whole
      • De Tremore, Palpitatione, Convulsione et Rigore On Tremor, Palpitation, Spasm and Rigor
      • De Tumoribus Praeter Naturam On Abnormal Swellings
      • De Typis On Types
      • De Usu Partium I-XI On the Utility of the Parts I-XI
      • De Usu Partium XII-XVII On the Utility of the Parts XII-XVII
      • De Usu Pulsuum On the Function of the Pulse
      • De Uteri Dissectione On the Anatomy of the Uterus
      • De Utilitate Respirationis On the Use of Breathing
      • De Venae Sectione adversus Erasistrateos Romae Degentes On Bloodletting against the Erasistrateans at Rome
      • De Venae Sectione adversus Erasistratum On Bloodletting against Erasistratus
      • De Venarum Arteriarumque Dissectione On the Anatomy of Veins and Arteries
      • De Victu Attenuante The Thinning Diet
      • Ex Galeni Commentariis De Fasciis From Galen's Commentaries on On Bandages
      • In Hippocratis Aphorismi I-V On Hippocrates' Aphorisms I-V
      • In Hippocratis Aphorismi VI-VII On Hippocrates' Aphorisms VI-VII
      • In Hippocratis De Acutorum Morborum Victu On Hippocrates' Regimen in Acute Diseases
      • In Hippocratis De Alimento On Hippocrates' Nutriment
      • In Hippocratis De Articulis On Hippocrates' Joints
      • In Hippocratis De Fracturis On Hippocrates' Fractures
      • In Hippocratis De Natura Hominis On Hippocrates' Nature of Man
      • In Hippocratis De Officina Medici On Hippocrates' Surgery
      • In Hippocratis De Praedictionibus On Hippocrates' Prorrhetics
      • In Hippocratis De Salubri Victus Ratione On Hippocrates' Regimen in Health
      • In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum I On Hippocrates' Epidemics I
      • In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum III On Hippocrates' Epidemics III
      • In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum VI 1-2 On Hippocrates' Epidemics VI 1-2
      • In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum VI 3-6 On Hippocrates' Epidemics VI 3-6
      • In Hippocratis Prognosticum On Hippocrates' Prognostic
      • Institutio Logica Introduction to Logic
      • Puero Epileptico Consilium Advice to an Epileptic Boy
      • Quod Animi Mores Corporis Temperamenta Sequantur The Faculties of the Soul follow the Mixtures of the Body
      • Quod Optimus Medicus Sit Quoque Philosophus The Best Doctor is also a Philosopher
      • Synopsis de Pulsibus Synopsis on Pulses
    • Gregory of Nazianzus
      • Carmen Morale XXX Moral Poems XXX
    • Hippocrates
      • Aphorismi Aphorisms
      • Coa Praesagia Coan Prenotions
      • De Aere, Aquis, Locis Airs, Waters, Places
      • De Affectionibus Affections
      • De Affectionibus Interioribus Internal Affections
      • De Alimento Nutriment
      • De Anatomia Anatomy
      • De Arte The Art
      • De Articulis Joints
      • De Capitis Vulneribus Wounds in the Head
      • De Carnibus Fleshes
      • De Corde Heart
      • De Crisibus Crises
      • De Dentitione Dentition
      • De Diaeta Regimen
      • De Diaeta Acutorum (spurium) Regimen in Acute Diseases (Appendix)
      • De Diaeta in Morbis Acutis Regimen in Acute Diseases
      • De Diebus Criticis Critical Days
      • De Exsectione Foetus Excision of the Fetus
      • De Fistulis Fistulas
      • De Flatibus Breaths
      • De Fracturis Fractures
      • De Genitura Generation
      • De Glandulis Glands
      • De Habitu Decenti Decorum
      • De Haemorrhoidibus Haemorrhoids
      • De Humoribus Humours
      • De Liquidorum Usu Use of Liquids
      • De Locis in Homine Places in Man
      • De Medico The Physician
      • De Morbis I Diseases I
      • De Morbis II Diseases II
      • De Morbis III Diseases III
      • De Morbis IV Diseases IV
      • De Morbo Sacro The Sacred Disease
      • De Muliebribus Diseases of Women
      • De Natura Hominis Nature of Man
      • De Natura Muliebri Nature of Women
      • De Natura Ossium Nature of Bones
      • De Natura Pueri Nature of the Child
      • De Octimestri Partu Eight Months' Child
      • De Officina Medici In the Surgery
      • De Prisca Medicina Ancient Medicine
      • De Salubri Diaeta Regimen in Health
      • De Superfoetatione Superfetation
      • De Ulceribus Ulcers
      • De Virginum Morbis Diseases of Young Girls
      • De Visu Sight
      • Epidemiarum I Epidemics I
      • Epidemiarum II Epidemics II
      • Epidemiarum III Epidemics III
      • Epidemiarum IV Epidemics IV
      • Epidemiarum V Epidemics V
      • Epidemiarum VI Epidemics VI
      • Epidemiarum VII Epidemics VII
      • Epistulae, Decretum, Orationes Letters, Decree, Speeches
      • Iusiurandum Oath
      • Lex Law
      • Praeceptiones Precepts
      • Prognosticon Prognostic
      • Prorrheticon I Prorrhetic I
      • Prorrheticon II Prorrhetic II
      • Vectiarius Mochlicon
    • Ḥunayn ibn Isḥāq
      • al-Risāla Epistle
    • Hypsicles
      • Anaphoricus On Ascensions
    • Ibn al-Nadīm
      • K. al-Fihrist The Catalogue
    • Ibn Riḍwān
      • Taʿālīq li-fawāʾid min Kitāb Qāṭīṭriyūn tafsīr Ǧālīnūs Notes on Useful Points Derived from Galen's Commentary on Hippocrates' In the Surgery
    • Ibn Rušd
      • Talḫīṣ kitāb al-ḥāss wa-l-maḥsūs Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Sense and Sensibilia
      • Talḫīṣ kitāb al-šiʿr Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Poetics
    • Ibn Sīnā
      • Kitāb al-šifāʾ: Fann al-šiʿr The Cure: Chapter on Aristotle's Poetics
    • Ibn Suwār
      • Taʿlīqāt kitāb Īsāġūǧī li-Furfuriyūs Notes on Porphyry's Isagoge
    • Nicolaus of Damascus
      • De Plantis On Plants
    • Nicomachus of Gerasa
      • Introductio Arithmeticae Introduction to Arithmetic
    • Pappus
      • In Euclidis Elementa Commentary on Euclid's Elements
    • Porphyry
      • De Vita Pythagorica Life of Pythagoras
      • Isagoge Introduction
    • Proclus Diadochus
      • De Aeternitate Mundi On the Eternity of the World
      • Institutio Theologica Elements of Theology
      • Quaestiones Naturales Natural Questions
    • ps-Aristotle
      • De Mundo On the Universe
      • De Somniis On Dreams
      • De Spiritu On Breath
      • Liber De Causis Discourse on the Pure Good
      • Testamentum Aristotelis Testament
    • ps-Galen
      • Ad Gaurum Quomodo Animetur Fetus To Gaurus on How Embryos are Ensouled
      • De Diaeta in Morbis Acutis secundum Hippocratem On Regimen in Acute Diseases in Accordance with the Theories of Hippocrates
      • De Fasciis On Bandages
      • De Optima Secta ad Thrasybulum On the Best Sect
      • De Remediis Parabilibus On Handy Medications
      • De Theriaca ad Pamphilianum On Theriac to Pamphilianus
      • De Venereis On Venereal Diseases
      • Introductio Seu Medicus Introduction
      • Quos, Quibus Catharticis Medicamentis et Quando Purgare Oporteat Whom to Purge, With Which Cleansing Drugs, and When
    • ps-Hermes Trismegistus
      • De Castigatione Animae Admonition of the Soul
    • ps-Hippocrates
      • De Septimestri Partu Seven Months' Child
    • ps-Menander
      • Sententiae Menandri (versio A) Menander's One-Verse Maxims
      • Sententiae Menandri (versio B) Menander's One-Verse Maxims
    • ps-Plato
      • Liber Quartorum Book of Fours
    • ps-Plutarch
      • Placita Philosophorum On the Opinions of the Philosophers
     And see also Studia graeco-arabica

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  • 08/13/18--07:48: Il discorso di Eraclito
  • Il discorso di Eraclito

    Authors: Gianvittorio, Laura
    ISBN: 9783487143866Year: 2010Pages: 308 SeitenDOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_507997 Language: Italian
    Publisher: Georg Olms VerlagGrant: Austrian Science Fund (FWF) - D 4144
    Subject: Philosophy --- Linguistics
    Added to DOAB on : 2015-01-28 11:01:18
    License:  
     

    Abstract Since the “scuola urbinate” (e. g. B. Gentili) applied the oral theory to the Greek lyricists, orality is seen to have influenced thought and language not only of rhapsodists, but of archaic authors in general. Against this background, I investigate how the interaction between orality and literacy, which I suggest to call “aurality”, influences the semantics and the linguistic reasoning chiefly of Heraclitus among the early presocratic thinkers. On the one hand Heraclitus is an oral “image-thinker” (Havelock) and his prose is poetically constructed; on the other hand only by writing he can figure out the discourse (λόγος) as a ὀνόματα-composed unity, as I mean he does, rather than holistic or as a continuum, what is common in oral societies. Such a λόγος is able to serve as a cosmological model, for the physical world consisting of a multiplicity of phenomena closely jointed to each other into an invisible unity.

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    Chapter four is also derived from the Arabic bible.

    1.  Then the priest ‘Ālī governed the people for twenty years.  The temple was located in Shīlūm (1).  The priest ‘Ālī had two sons.  The first was called Hufni and the second Finhās.  In his time there lived a prophet of ar-Rāmayyayn (2) named Hilqānā, son of Yārūhām, of the tribe of Levi (3).  The prophet Hilqānā had two wives: one was called Hanna, and was sterile, and the other Hanānā (4), who had children.  Hanna used to go to the temple in Shīlūn to invoke God and ask him to give her a child.  She had made a vow to God that she would put him at the service of the temple.  She conceived and bore Samū’il, the prophet.  When Samū’il was three years old, his father Hilqānā and his mother Hanna took him to the temple in Shīlūn, where they offered sacrifices to God and entrusted their son Samū’il to the priest ‘Ālī.  So Samū’īl began to serve in the temple.  The foreign tribes gathered to fight against the children of Israel and killed four thousand men in war.  Then the leaders of the sons of Israel said:  “Let us take the Ark of the Covenant from Shīlūn and keep it among us when we fight for God, to deliver us through it from the hands of our enemies” (5).  So they took the ark from Shīlūn and placed the two sons of ‘Ālī, Hufni and Finhās near them. The foreign tribes came out against them and beat them and killed thirty thousand Israelites.  Whoever managed to escape fled.  The two sons of ‘Ālī, Hufni and Finhās were also killed.  The foreign tribes seized the ark and took it from Yazdūd to Ghazza (6), placing it in the temple of the idol Dā‘ūn.  The priest ‘Ālī was sitting at the temple door in Shīlūn, when a man entered who had taken part in the defeat, with a dirty face and tattered clothes. The priest Ālī said to him: “What happened to you?”  He replied: “The sons of Israel have been defeated. They made a great slaughter, even your children were killed and the ark was taken” (7).  On hearing that the ark had been taken, the priest ‘Ālī fell face down and died instantly, at the age of ninety (8).  The next day the inhabitants of Ghazza poured into the temple of Dā‘ūn to see the ark, but they found the idol Dā‘ūn with his face to the ground, at the foot of the ark.  Death fell on the city of Ghazza, the inhabitants were hit by dysentery and their territory filled with flies and geckos (9). The ark stayed with them for four months.  In another text it is said: for seven months.  Eventually the inhabitants of Ghazza said: “Clearly if we were struck by the dysentery and the plague of these flies and geckos it was because of this ark.  Let’s carry it away if we do not want to die”.  But some said: “Let’s see if it is precisely for this reason.  Let us take two bulls that have never ploughed, attach them to a new cart and place the ark on top of it, placing a chest near it with images of the flies and geckos (10) of gold and silver, gift of every village, of Ghazza, of ‘Asqalān, of Rafakh, of Yazdūd and of ‘Aqrūn (11). If the bulls go to the land of the sons of Israel, we will get rid of the ark and we will know that this dysentery, flies and geckos are here because of the ark.  But if they do not go in the direction of the land of the sons of Israel, we will know that all this is a phenomenon of the alteration of the air and of the pestilence” (12).  They did as they said.  But the two bulls made their way to the land of the sons of Israel, and that was how they found peace from the dysentery that had struck them, and the geckos and flies left them.  When the two bulls arrived at Bayt Shams (13), the inhabitants were busy at the harvest in the camp of Usiyā  (14).  They took the ark, tore the chariot to pieces and sacrificed the two bullocks, hastening them to God as a sacrifice.  Then they took the casket with pictures of flies and geckos of gold and silver. The ark was taken to the village known to the inhabitants under the name of Qaryat al-Inab (15), and to the home of Abinādāb, father of Ghazā (16) and hidden in a place called “al-Ğab’ā “, i.e. the stronghold.  There were chosen as custodians of the Ark Ghazā and Ahnū (17).

    3. After the death of the priest ‘Ālī, the prophet Samuel ruled the people for twenty years. The children of Israel abandoned the worship of idols and began to worship God.  The foreign tribes were afraid of them.  The sons of Israel took back from the foreign tribes all the cities they had occupied, from ‘Aqrūn to Rafakh.  The prophet Samuel had two sons: the elder was called Yū’il and the younger Abiyyā.  They ruled the people in peace and quiet at Bi’r Sab‘a (18).  When the prophet Samuel became old, some of the Israelites went to him, to ar-Rāma, and told him: “Give us a king to reign over us like all the other peoples have.” The prophet Samuel answered them: “If you make a king, he will take your possessions for himself, and he will take tithes of all that you possess” (19).  They answered him: “That is acceptable”. Then the prophet Samuel told them: “I know a man from the tribe of Beniamin, named Qīsh, son of Anī’īl (20), who has a son named Shāwl (21), handsome, tall and brave. I will make him your king “.  Qish, Saul’s father, [found that] some donkeys were lost. Qīsh said to his son Saul: “Take your servant with you and go and look for the donkeys”. Saul went out from village to village looking for the donkeys.  The servant told him: “Let us go to the village of the prophet Samuel and he will show us the place where the donkeys are” (22).  Then they went to the prophet Samuel, who gave them food and drink.  Then he took a horn full of oil, poured it on Saul’s head and anointed him saying: “Today God makes you king of the children of Israel.  You will have a sign in the fact that you will go to your father and find the donkeys are with him” (23).  And it happened as the prophet Samuel had said.

    4. Saul was the first to reign over the sons of Israel.  The men of the city of Yābīn (24) and of the city of Gala’ad went over to Māhash (25) the Ammonite because they were not satisfied with King Saul.  Māhash went out with many men to fight Saul.  But Saul won, and he made a great slaughter of the Ammonites.  Then the prophet Samuel took with him Saul and a group of elders of the sons of Israel and went with them to Galğāl (26).  He took a horn full of oil and anointed Saul a second time in Galğal before those gathered there.  The people were pleased with the choice of Saul and offered many sacrifices to God. Saul chose three thousand Israelites to stay with him.  Saul had a son named Yūnāthān (27).  Gionata, son of Saul, took a thousand of his father’s men and fought against Nāsīm (28) who was in Yūnawā (29) and killed him along with a great multitude of the foreign tribes.  When the foreign tribes learned what Jonathan had done, they gathered thirty thousand foot soldiers and six thousand horsemen (30) and went out to fight against the sons of Israel in Galğal.  The children of Israel were overwhelmed by fear and escaped into the mountains, through the valleys and into the desert.  Saul was in Galğāl.  Gionata then took with him a group of Israelites, went out against the soldiers of the foreign tribes and defeated them, making a great slaughter.  When he heard about it, Saul attacked the soldiers of the foreign tribes by surprise and killed them, and none were saved.  Then the prophet Samuel said to King Saul: “Go to the city of the Amalekites, destroy it and fire it, killing all those who are there, men, women, children and animals” (31). Saul took with him four thousand infantrymen of Galğal and thirty thousand Israelites of the tribe of Judah (32) and set off against the Amalekites.  He killed all the Amalekites from the city of Hayūlā to the city of Sur (33) and captured Aghāğ, king of the Amalekites alive. But he did not destroy their farms and their vineyards, nor did he kill any of their animals; on the contrary, his men looted their flocks, their cattle and their pack animals. When [Saul] returned from the war to Galğāl, the prophet Samuel told him: “Did I not order you to kill their flocks, their cattle, their pack animals and destroy their land?  Since you have not done so, I will anoint another man as king of the sons of Israel “(34). Then the prophet Samuel took Aghağ, king of the Amalekites, and had him killed. Then he returned to ar-Rāma and Saul returned to his home, al-Gab‘a (35).

    5. A few days later Samuel went to Bethlehem, took Dāwud (36), son of Yassà, and anointed him with the oil as king of the sons of Israel.  David was still young.  Later the foreign tribes reunited to fight against Saul.  Saul went out to face them with his men. David’s brothers were fighting alongside Saul.  Yassà took his son David, provided him with food and sent him to his brothers at the war.  David reached his brothers in the middle of the war and saw a man of the foreign tribes, named Gulyāt (37), who shouted: “Sons of Israel, is there no one to come forward?”(38).  David told his brothers: “I will kill that man” (39).  The brothers scolded him.  But King Saul heard about it, called David, gave him a shield and a sword and ordered him to face Goliath.  When he was on the front line, David got rid of the shield and the weapons, throwing the sword away and took a sling that he always carried with him, put a stone on it and threw it, striking Goliath’s forehead.  Goliath collapsed on the ground.  David took the sword and finished him off.  The soldiers of the foreign tribes therefore fled and were massacred.  Saul named David the head of a thousand leaders (40).

    6. Saul sent David to fight against the foreign tribes a second time.  David went out and killed a hundred men and cut off their foreskins and sent them to Saul.  Saul gave his daughter Milhūl to him as wife (41).  And those foreskins were her dowry.  Every time Saul sent David to fight he won and conquered [the city].  Seeing this, Saul feared he could take the throne away from him.  He was therefore very afraid of David and thought to kill him.  But David fled and four hundred men joined him (42).  The prophet Samuel died and was buried in his house, in ar-Rāmah.  Saul went out once again to fight against the foreign tribes, but he was defeated and was left wounded on the field.  He then said to his armour-bearer: “Kill me, so that the enemy do not take me alive” (43).  But the servant refused to do so.  Then Saul took the sword and killed himself.  Seeing this, the servant also gave himself death.  In that battle a great slaughter of the sons of Israel was made and among them were killed Gionata, Abīnādām and Malhīsh, the sons of Saul (44).  The next morning the tribes sought out the dead, took the head of Saul and those of his sons, and sent them to their country, hanging their bodies on the fortified tower of Baniyas (45).  Learning of this in his country (46), they took the bodies and buried them in Baniyas (47).  David was in Siqlā` (48).  A man with a smeared face and tattered clothes showed up.  David told him: “What news do you bring?” He replied: “Saul and his sons Gionata, Abinādam and Malhish were killed in the war.  And it was I who killed them” (49).  David and his men tore their clothes and for three days (50) remained without eating bread, because of the sadness felt for the fate of Saul and the sons of Israel who had died with him.  Then David called the man who had brought him the news and had him killed, to punish him for having himself confessed to having killed them.  Saul had reigned for twenty years.


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    You probably know Easter Island as "the place with the giant stone heads." This remote island 2,300 miles off the coast of Chile has long been seen as mysterious--a place where Polynesian seafarers set up camp, built giant statues, and then destroyed their own society through in-fighting and over-exploitation of natural resources. However, a new article in the Journal of Pacific Archaeology hints at a more complex story--by analyzing...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]


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    The Beierwaltes are taking legal action after Swiss authorities seized objects during a raid on a warehouse in Switzerland (Amanda Pampuro, "Colorado Couple Seek to Reclaim Artifacts From Swiss", Court House News 8 August 2018).  The Beierwaltes had consigned their pieces for sale by Phoenix Ancient Art in Geneva. 

    The Beierwaltes are seeking $24 million in damages for the seizure of the 18 objects valued at $8 million.

    It appears that the Beierwaltes were purchasing objects from Robin Symes. Do any of the 18 objects consigned to Geneva appear in the Schinousa archive? Will the Beierwaltes release the full histories of the objects?

    The story mentions that the Beierwaltes
    assert they vetted all of their items and “purchased each object in reliance on express or implied representations from reputable dealers and auction houses in the absence of any thefts reported to publicly available databases of stolen art, such as the Art Loss Register.”
    This statement fails to note that objects removed from archaeological contexts would not necessarily be reported to the ALR or other similar registers.

    See also the material from Eshmun.

    Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know

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     [First posted in AWOL 12 October 2011, updated (full text of vol. 4) 13 August 2018]

    The Journal of Egyptological Studies (JES)
    http://egyptology-bg.org/wp-content/themes/egypt/images/logo.png


    The Journal of Egyptological Studies (JES) is published by the Bulgarian Institute of Egyptology. It is issued on an annual basis since September 2004. The JES is a result of the development and expansion of Egyptology in Bulgaria. It gives Egyptologists an opportunity to publish new original ideas, new approaches and data in connection with the language, literature, religion, archeology and history of the “place where our hearts live”.

    The Journal of Egyptological Studies is open to the international Egyptolgical society, but also aims to establish a bridge between Western schools of Egyptology and their colleagues from Eastern Europe. As a result of World War II and the political changes, which took place afterwards, part of the connections between scholars from different countries in Europe has been interrupted. Nowadays, for example, few Egyptologists abroad know about fundamental achievements of Russian scholars in the field of socio-economic, political and cultural history of Ancient Egypt. We want to cooperate in filling this gap, encouraging young scholars to contribute to the process of exchange of ideas and experience in our field.
    See the full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

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    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
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    Friday, October 5, 2018 - 7:30pm

    Lecturer: Maryanne Maddoux

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    Estudios Orientales: Cuadernos mográficos de Historia del Próximo Oriente Antiguo
    ISSN: 1577-3523



    La revista Estudios Orientales es un revista científica especializada en el Próximo Oriente Antiguo y publicada anualmente por la Universidad de Murcia. Fundada en 1997 por el catedrático Antonino González Blanco, a lo largo de sus años de existencia ha evitado los trabajos de síntesis o meramente descriptivos y ha acogido una amplia diversidad de monografías y artículos siempre originales.
    Esta revista está abierta a todos los planteamientos y orientaciones metodológicas que superen el estricto examen del consejo de redacción, pero a la vez se puede plantear un tema central de discusión o incluso monografías que sirva de marco conceptual y temático a los originales. El rasgo distintivo de la línea editorial de esta revista es su búsqueda de aportaciones originales, claras, de carácter inédito, que vayan a hacer una aportación nueva, profesional y metodológicamente solvente, que sea significativa en el ámbito de los estudios del Próximo Oriente.
     Nº 8 – Homenaje al Dr. Antonino González blanco
    Artículo Páginas
    Índice 3
    ¿Orientalismo en Murcia? La labor del profesor Antonino González BlancoAlejandro Egea Vivancos, José Javier Martínez García, Helena Jiménez Vialás 9
    Aspect of Elamite Art and Religious ideology: The rock-cut sanctuary of Kūrangūn and Aesthetics of the Natural EnvironmentJavier Álvarez-Món 15
    Las palomas de Atargatis y los retiros acoimetas. Hipótesis de interpretación para los columbaria del Valle del Saŷur (Eufratense, Siria)Alejandro Egea Vivancos 35
    La exposición de cadáveres y el surgimiento de los dakhmas: un rito funerario en el oikoumene persa (ss. VI a.C.-VII d.C.)Marina Girona Berenguer y David Soria Molina 51
    Las disposiciones hereditarias a favor de la esposa en Emar (Siria, s. XIII a. C.)Josué J. Justel Vicente 61
    Notas sobre la iconografía de las acuñaciones hispano-púnicasM.ª Cruz Marín Ceballos 73
    Asirios en el Éufrates. Nuevos datos arqueológicos y epigráficos sobre la expansión del Imperio Asirio MedioJuan-Luis Montero Fenollós 83
    Testimonios del reinado del hijo de Alejandro Magno en EgiptoJosep Padró i Parcerisa 95
    Elamita vs. sumerio: dos formas análogas de expresiónEnrique Quintana Cifuentes 99
    La magia en EgiptoFelipe Sen Montero 107
    El camino real frente a los ríos: los puentes durante el periodo aqueménidaJoaquín Velázquez Muñoz 117

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    Lecturer: John Jamison

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    Remnants of what was one of the most important streets in Philippopolis, the ancient name of...

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    Recently Published Open Access Books and Articles at Archaeopress


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    The development of complexity at third-millennium BC al-Khashbah, Sultanate of Oman: results of the first two seasons, 2015 and 2016Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 47 2017 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, and Janet Starkey. Pages 215–226.Download
    By Conrad Schmidt & Stephanie Döpper

    The transition from the Hafit to the Umm an-Nar period on the Oman peninsula in the third millennium BC is regarded as a period of substantial social and economic change. Although many thousands of tombs from the Hafit period remain, other archaeological evidence, such as settlements, is scarce. In 2015 therefore, a new archaeological research project conducted by the University of Tübingen and funded by the German Research Foundation was launched at al-Khashbah to investigate its Hafit and Umm an-Nar period remains. During the first two seasons research consisted of an intensive field survey, aerial survey, two geophysical surveys, as well as archaeological excavations in selected areas within the site. Among other archaeological remains, al-Khashbah features three Hafit-period stone towers and six towers from the Umm an-Nar period, including the famous rectangular building. The most important discoveries are a Hafit-period settlement with monumental mud-brick architecture and a stone-built tower dating to the end of the fourth millennium BC, associated with the oldest evidence of copper processing in Oman. Both findings testify to the importance of al-Khashbah for the investigation of the development of complexity at the end of the fourth and the beginning of the third millennium BC.
    The reuse of tombs in the necropolis of Bat, Sultanate of OmanTaken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 45 2015 edited by Orhan Elmaz. Pages 83–92.Download
    By Stephanie Döpper

    The reuse of Umm an-Nar tombs in later periods on the Oman peninsula is an often neglected phenomenon. Within the scope of this paper, the results from the excavation conducted by the University of Tübingen of two Umm an-Nar tombs in the necropolis of Bat, Sultanate of Oman — Tomb 155 and Tomb 156 — will be presented. In these two tombs, we find clear evidence for their reuse in the Iron Age. In addition, indications for the reuse of other tombs within the necropolis, excavated by the German Mining Museum Bochum and by the Danish expedition in the 1970s — Tombs 154, 401, 402, 403, 1142, and 1143 — will also be discussed. Together they give a broad picture of the different kinds of Iron Age reuse in the necropolis of Bat, consisting of individual inhumations within the Umm an-Nar tombs, the creation of new Iron Age tombs in the direct vicinity of the Umm an-Nar tombs and the reuse of their building materials, and scattered stray finds dating to later periods in the debris of the Umm an-Nar tombs. Finally, I will attempt to link the reuse of Umm an-Nar tombs to practices connected to collective memory.
    Umm an-Nar pottery assemblages from Bāt and al-Zībā and their functional contextsTaken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 46 2016 edited by Janet Starkey and Orhan Elmaz. Pages 247–262.Download
    By Conrad Schmidt & Stephanie Döpper

    The sites of Bāt and al-Zībā (Zebah) in the Sultanate of Oman offer a range of different archaeological features dating to the Umm an-Nar period. In this paper we present the pottery assemblages from two burial pits detected just outside a group of Umm an-Nar tombs in the necropolis of Bāt, from the monumental Building II in Area B at Bāt, and from two house complexes in al-Zībā, which were all excavated by the University of Tübingen between 2010 and 2015. By comparing the assemblages with each other, it will be demonstrated that there is a clear distinction in shapes, wares, and decorations between the burial pits, on the one hand, and Building II and al-Zībā, on the other. We argue, therefore, for a functional difference between grave and non-grave pottery in the Umm an-Nar period. Furthermore, we show that the Umm an-Nar pottery is astonishingly homogeneous in the whole of the northern Oman peninsula and discuss its implications for the understanding of the social structure at that time.
    NEW: Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range, Pilbara Region, Western Australia edited by Dawn Cropper and W. Boone Law, foreword by Maitland Parker and Slim Parker, Martidja Banyjima Elders. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+454 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £90.00). 458 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919764. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919771. Book contents pageDownload
    Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range offers a detailed study of six exceptional rockshelter sites from the inland Pilbara Region of Western Australia. It provides highly descriptive, chapter-length accounts of archaeological investigations at Jundaru, Djadjiling, HS-A1, HD073APAD13, PAD 3, and HD073A03 rockshelters, which were excavated as part of a mitigative salvage program conducted at the Hope Downs 1 mine between 2007 and 2010. The research findings show that early Aboriginal peoples initially occupied the area ca. 45,000 years ago, demonstrating that the east Hamersley Range contains some of the oldest known Aboriginal archaeological sites in the Australian arid zone. The story of the Pleistocene and Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Hope Downs 1 is long and complex. Using an extensive radiocarbon and OSL chronology that spans from >47,000 years ago to the recent past, the story of the Aboriginal archaeological record is explored via prominent changes in lithic technology, artefact use-wear/residues, combustion features, faunal remains, rockshelter geomorphology, archaeomagnetism, and pollen/phytolith analysis. The work investigates the early occupation of the region and examines the archaeological evidence for occupation during the last glacial maximum. It chronicles significant changes in Aboriginal stone artefact technology over time with its analysis of more than 35,000 chipped stone artefacts.

    Consisting of 18 chapters, the volume is rich with colour photographs, illustrations, and figures, including high-resolution images of the rockshelter sites, excavations, stratigraphic sections, cultural features, and artefacts. It includes a foreword by the Martidja Banyjima elders, who contextualise the cultural importance of this work to Banyjima Peoples and Traditional Owners of the region. The monograph also includes comprehensive synthesis of the regional archaeological record by the editors and a chapter on Banyjima culture and traditions by consulting anthropologists Dr Nadia Butler, Dr Neale Draper, and Fiona Sutherland. Many specialist studies were commissioned for the Hope Downs work, including an archaeomagnetism report by Dr Andy Herries (LaTrobe University), a faunal analysis study by Dr. Matthew McDowell (University of Tasmania), a phytolith analysis by Dr Lynley Wallis (University of Notre Dame Australia), a palynological study by Dr Simon Haberle, Feli Hopf, and Dr Phil Roberts (Australian National University), artefact usewear/residue analysis by Dr Richard Fullagar (University of Wollongong), optically stimulated luminescence dating by Frances Williams (University of Adelaide), and a rockshelter geomorphological study by Prof Martin Williams (University of Adelaide).
    About the Editors
    DAWN CROPPER is the Director of Archaeology at leading consulting company, New Zealand Heritage Properties, which has branches in Dunedin, Christchurch, and Invercargill. As Director, Dawn’s responsibilities include the management of all archaeology teams across the branches, development of process and training, as well as the development of proprietary methodology for archaeological risk management across large areas. She also specialises in heritage impact assessments and is a leading expert in the management of large-scale archaeological projects throughout New Zealand. Dawn holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), with a focus on technological analysis of flaked stone tools. From 2007 to 2013 she worked as a senior archaeologist and lithic specialist for Australian Cultural Heritage Management Pty Ltd, co-managing and supervising the Hope Downs 1 rockshelter excavations with W. Boone Law.

    W. BOONE LAW is a scientist and heritage professional that specialises in the Aboriginal archaeology of the Australian Arid Zone. His qualifications include a BA in Anthr
    NEW: Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload
    Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

    The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

    The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.
    About the Editors
    JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

    SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

    HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

    AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
    NEW: Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South LanarkshireA Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload
    This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.
    About the Author
    After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

    The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.
    NEW: La ocupación cazadora-recolectora durante la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno en el oeste de Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil: geoarqueología de los sitios en la formación sedimentaria Touro Passo by Viviane Pouey Vidal. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text (Print RRP £55.00). 57 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919139. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919146. Book contents pageDownload
    This book presents the results obtained during geoarchaeological studies carried out in the locality of Touro Passo, municipality of Uruguaiana, Brazil. There, the Paleoindian sites studied by the team of the PRONAPA-National Archaeological Research Program in the 1960s and 1970s were relocated and others with excellent study potential have been recognized. The archaeological sites are located in the alluvial plains of the Uruguay River and the Touro Passo Stream and correspond to the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition.

    The geoarchaeological approach allowed the understanding of the stratigraphic sequence and the processes of formation and post-depositional disturbance of the archaeological sites in a fluvial environment. Archaeological excavations, soundings, stratigraphic profile surveys, sequence correlations and numerical dates were carried out. The dispersion of artifacts on the surface and cave erosion was recorded, and a lithic taphonomy study was carried out. Four Paleoindian sites located in the Touro Passo Formation were analyzed: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66: Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito and Casualidade. The new chronologies obtained for the initial period of human occupation in the region represent a scientific advance for the study of hunter-gatherer occupations during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene in the triple border of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.
    About the Author
    Viviane Pouey Vidal has a PhD in Archaeology (Faculty of Social Sciences, UNICEN-National University of the Center of the Province of Buenos Aires-Olavarría). She is a researcher at the GEGAL - Group of Geoarchaeological Studies of Latin America. She was a PhD Fellow abroad by the CAPES - Coordination of Improvement of Higher Level Personnel. She acted as University teacher in the Interdisciplinary Degree Course in Human Sciences at UNIPAMPA - Federal University of Pampa, São Borja Campus / Rio Grande do Sul (2015/2017). She is a member of the Frontier Relations Research Group: History, Politics and Culture in the Triple Frontier Brazil and Uruguay (CNPq-Federal University of Pampa). She is the author of the PPC- Pedagogical Project of the Bachelor's Degree Course in Archaeology that aims to be implemented in the UNIPAMPA. She acts as a consultant in archaeological and patrimonial research in environmental licensing, with experience in Precolonial research and Patrimonial Education.

    Spanish Description: Este libro presenta los resultados obtenidos durante los estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en la localidad Touro Passo, municipio de Uruguaiana, Brasil. Alli se reubicaron los sitios paleoindios estudiados por el equipo del PRONAPA-Programa Nacional de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en las décadas de 1960 y 1970 y han sido reconocidos otros con excelente potencial de estudio. Los sitios arqueológicos están situados en las planicies aluviales del Río Uruguay y del Arroyo Touro Passo y corresponden a la transición Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano.

    El enfoque geoarqueológico permitió la comprensión de la secuencia estratigráfica y los procesos de formación y perturbación postdepositacional de los sitios arqueológicos en ambiente fluvial. Fueron realizadas excavaciones arqueológicas, sondeos, relevamiento de perfiles-estratigráficos, correlaciones de secuencias y fechados numéricos. Se registró la dispersión de los artefactos en superficie y en las cárvavas de erosión, y se realizó, un estudio de tafonomía lítica. Se analizaron 4 sitios paleoindios situados en la Formación Touro Passo: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66:Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito y Casualidade. Las nuevas cronologías obtenidas para el período inicial de ocupación humana en la región, representan un avance científico para el estudio de las ocupaciones cazadoras-recolectoras durante el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano en la triple frontera Brasil, Argentina y Uruguay.

    Biografía da autora: Viviane P
    NEW: La industria lítica bifacial del sitio en cantera Chipana-1Conocimiento y técnica de los grupos humanos del Desierto de Atacama, norte de Chile al final del Pleistoceno by Katherine A. Herrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+106 pages; 60 illustrations; 8 tables (55 colour plates). Spanish text with English Abstract (Print RRP £34.00). 55 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 51. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919115. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919122. Book contents pageDownload
    The site of Chipana-1 is located in the middle of the Atacama Desert, in the Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT), 1200 m asl. The site is a good example of past societies adaptation to hyper-arid environments, and provides new insights into the early human occupations of South America. The well-preserved stratigraphic record, together with 13 radiocarbon dates, show that the site was occupied around 11,480 cal BP. Chipana-1 is a lithic raw-material extraction and workshop site, of a silicified rock of good quality, mainly related to the production of bifacial tools (façonnage), and to a lesser extent, of flakes (débitage) on surface. This is the first site in northern Chile that provides information on the first stages of lithic production, such as raw-material selection and reduction (dégrossissage). In addition, flakes resulting from façonnage (shaping method) suggest the local elaboration of large bifacial pieces that have not been recovered on site, indicating that part of the production was probably exported elsewhere, within and outside the borders of the PdT. Some smaller flakes also suggest a local production of “Tuina” type projectile points, a morphotype well-known in the regions south of the Atacama Desert. One can highlight the presence of flakes of allochthonous raw-materials, imported from other areas, which have been flaked at Chipana-1 in order to produce bifacial tools. Chipana-1 was an important location for Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups, poorly known until now, for the gathering of raw-materials and lithic production in the Atacama Desert. The site was integrated within a broader network of mobility that we are just starting to discover.

    Spanish description: El sitio Chipana-1, situado en pleno corazón del Desierto de Atacama en la Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) a 1200 msnm, refleja la adaptación de antiguas sociedades humanas a un ambiente hiper-árido, y aporta nuevos datos al debate sobre las primeras ocupaciones humanas en América del Sur. La buena conservación estratigráfica y 13 dataciones 14C muestran que el sitio fué frecuentado alrededor de los 11.480 cal BP. Chipana-1 es un sitio de producción lítica esencialmente de façonnage (modelado) bifacial, con un mínimo de débitage (desbaste) de lascas, observables en la superficie de esta gran cantera-taller de roca sílicificada de buena calidad. Este tipo de sitio es inédito dentro del norte de Chile, debido a que permite observar las etapas iniciales de elaboración como la selección cualitativa de la materia prima y su preparación (dégrossissage). Además, lascas del façonnage indican la elaboración de grandes piezas bifaciales no encontradas en el sitio, probablemente fueron exportadas a otras áreas dentro y fuera de la PdT. Algunas lascas más pequeñas señalan la producción de una punta de proyectil tipo “Tuina”, conocida en tierras altas hacia el sur del Atacama. Destacamos también la presencia de lascas de façonnage bifacial de materias primas alóctonas, que fueron importadas a la cantera como productos ya trabajados en otros sitios. Así Chipana-1 fue, para grupos de cazadores recolectores aún desconocidos al final del Pleistoceno, un punto importante de adquisición de roca tallable y de producción lítica en el Desierto de Atacama, insertado en un circuito de movilidad que recién comenzamos a develar.
    NEW: Navigation et installations lacustres dans les hautes terres du Mexiqueles cas mexica et tarasque by Alexandra Biar. Paperback; 203x276mm; xvi+292 pages; 217 illustrations; 33 tables (119 colour plates). French text with English summary and foreword (Print RRP £60.00). 54 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 50. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919092. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919108. Book contents pageDownload
    In a cultural area where geography conspires against ease of exchange, Mesoamerican societies discovered technical answers adapted to their needs. At a time when the exchange of merchandise and goods relied mainly on human transport, some civilizations turned to a mystical aquatic environment: lakes. This research focuses on the practice of lake navigation and specific facilities that are associated with it. Due to the need for a wholistic approach, this research is situated in a multidisciplinary framework that combines archaeology, ethnology and ethnohistory. Its primary objective is to elaborate the framework of a new research field from the analytical and systematic study of a corpus of eclectic data, about the exploitation of water as a means of transport.

    In Mesoamerica, the greatest concentration of lake systems lies in the Mexican highlands. However, only the Mexico and Pátzcuaro Basin were converted into real political economic and cultural centres, with the emergence of the Mexica Empire and Tarascan State in the Late Postclassic period (1350-1521). Why then do archaeologists, ethnologists and historians persist in ignoring the true importance of navigation in their study of the formation and organization of these two civilizations? To what extent can we extract, from the study of boats and lake installations, data that can open new research perspectives?

    French description: Dans une aire culturelle où la géographie conspire contre la fluidité des échanges, les sociétés mésoaméricaines ont su trouver des réponses techniques adaptées à leurs besoins. À une époque où l’acheminement de marchandises et de biens s’effectue principalement à dos d’homme, certaines civilisations vont se tourner vers un milieu aquatique mythique : les lacs. Ce travail de recherche s’intéresse donc à la pratique de la navigation lacustre et aux installations spécifiques qui lui sont associées. De par la nécessité d’une approche transversale, ce sujet se positionne dans un cadre pluridisciplinaire, entremêlant archéologie, ethnohistoire et ethnologie. Son objectif premier est de délimiter le cadre d’un nouveau champ de recherche à partir d’une étude analytique et systématique d’un corpus de données éclectiques, autour de l’exploitation d’un mode de transport aquatique.

    En Mésoamérique, c’est dans les hautes terres mexicaines que seuls les lacs des Bassins de Mexico et de Pátzcuaro ont été convertis en de véritables centres politiques, économiques et culturels à l’origine de l’émergence de l’Empire mexica et du Royaume tarasque à la période Postclassique (1350-1521). Pourquoi archéologues, historiens et ethnologues continuent donc d’ignorer la véritable importance de la navigation dans l’étude de la formation et de l’organisation de ces deux civilisations ? Dans quelle mesure les données que nous pourrons extraire de l’étude des embarcations et des installations lacustres peuvent-elles ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives de recherches ?
    NEW: The Population of Tikal: Implications for Maya Demography by David Webster. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+152 pages; 22 illustrations, 13 tables (Print edition RRP £34.00). 48 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 49. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918453. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918460. Book contents pageDownload
    The Classic Maya (AD 250-900) of central and southern Yucatan were long seen as exceptional in many ways. We now know that they did not invent Mesoamerican writing or calendars, that they were just as warlike as other ancient peoples, that many innovations in art and architecture attributed to them had diverse origins, and that their celebrated “collapse” is not what it seems. One exceptionalist claim stubbornly persists: the Maya were canny tropical ecologists who managed their fragile tropical environments in ways that supported extremely large and dense populations and still guaranteed resilience and sustainability. Archaeologists commonly assert that Maya populations far exceeded those of other ancient civilizations in the Old and New Worlds. The great center of Tikal, Guatemala, has been central to our conceptions of Maya demography since the 1960s. Re-evaluation of Tikal’s original settlement data and its implications, supplemented by much new research there and elsewhere, allows a more modest and realistic demographic evaluation. The peak Classic population probably was on the order of 1,000,000 people. This population scale helps resolve debates about how the Maya made a living, the nature of their sociopolitical systems, how they created an impressive built environment, and places them in plausible comparative context with what we know about other ancient complex societies.
    About the Author
    DAVID WEBSTER received his doctoral degree in anthropology from the University of Minnesota in 1972. He originally intended to become a Near Eastern archaeologist, but he was deflected into Mesoamerican archaeology by the opportunity to work at the fortified site of Becan, Campeche, Mexico. This experience stimulated a long interest in warfare among the Classic Maya and other complex societies. His field work and research included projects in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala, and heavily focused on settlement survey, household archaeology, demographic reconstruction, and human ecology. Webster joined the faculty of the Anthropology Department at Penn State University in 1972 and spent his career there until his retirement in 2014. He is now emeritus professor at Penn State, where he continues an active program of writing and research.
    Table of Contents
    Introduction; A Short History of Maya Demographic Estimates and their Implications; Comparative Demographic Estimates for Other Civilizations; University of Pennsylvania Tikal Project Population Estimates; The “Managed Forest” Model for the Lowland Maya: Implications for Tikal; Biases and Limitations of the Tikal Research and some Comparisons with Copan; How Many Maya Lived in the Central and Southern Lowlands during Late and Terminal Classic Times? ; Discussion and Conclusions; Appendix A: Population Density Calculations; Appendix B: The Big Stuff; Appendix C: Agricultural Intensification; Appendix D: Maya Food Shortfalls and Their Consequences; Appendix E: Agrarian Capital, Land Tenure, Inheritance, Entitlements, and Agency; Appendix F: Classic Maya Political Organization and Institutions; Appendix G: Malthus, Boserup, and the Maya References cited
    Current Research in Egyptology 2017Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Symposium: University of Naples, “L’Orientale” 3–6 May 2017 edited by Ilaria Incordino, Stefania Mainieri, Elena D’Itria, Maria Diletta Pubblico, Francesco Michele Rega, Anna Salsano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (75 colour plates). 56 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919054. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919061. Book contents pageDownload
    Current Research in Egyptology 2017 presents papers delivered during the eighteenth meeting of this international conference, held at the University of Naples “L’Orientale”, 3–6 May, 2017. Some 122 scholars from all over the world gathered in Naples to attend three simultaneous sessions of papers and posters, focussed on a large variety of subjects: Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt, Nubian Studies, Language and Texts, Art and Architecture, Religion and Cult, Field Projects, Museums and Archives, Material Culture, Mummies and Coffins, Society, Technologies applied to Egyptology, Environment. The participants attended seven keynote presentations given by Rosanna Pirelli (Egyptologist), Irene Bragantini (Roman Archaeologist) and Andrea Manzo (Nubian Archaeologist) from the University of Naples “L’Orientale”; Marilina Betrò (Egyptologist) from Pisa University; Patrizia Piacentini (Egyptologist) from Milan University; Christian Greco (Director of Turin Egyptian Museum) and Daniela Picchi (Archaeological Museum of Bologna). Delegates were able to take advantage of a guided tour of the Oriental Museum Umberto Scerrato (University of Naples “L’Orientale”), access to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) and guided tours of the archaeological site of Pompeii and the Gaiola Underwater Park. The editors dedicate this volume to the late Prof. Claudio Barocas who inaugurated the teaching of Egyptology and Coptic Language and Literature in Naples.
    From tentscape to landscape: a multi-scale analysis of long-term patterns of occupation in north-west QatarTaken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, Tim Power, and Janet Starkey. Pages 31-45.Download
    By Jose C. Carvajal López et al

    This paper presents the main results of The Crowded Desert Project (TCD) survey during the 2017 season concerning the distribution, orientation, and strategic location of campsites in the area under study. After explaining the evidence recorded in the field, the article proposes an archaeological interpretation based on ethnographic models provided by Ferdinand (1993) and Montigny (1979; 1983; 1985), and on archaeological models advanced by Macumber (2016) and McPhillips, Rosendahl and Morgan (2015). Although ethnoarchaeology is criticized nowadays, it is suggested in this paper that a careful methodology built on the correlation of material evidence and relevant ethnographical data (e.g. Guérin 1994) can provide significant results to interpret the archaeological record of the area of study. The results provide interesting insights regarding the long-term continuity of the structural principles that guide the strategies of the design and location of nomadic campsites at least between AD 400–300 and the twentieth century.

    Keywords: Qatar, desert archaeology, archaeology of the nomads, landscape archaeology, ethnoarchaeology
    Gardens of Istanbul in Persian hajj traveloguesTaken from Travellers in Ottoman Lands edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Pages 57-68.Download
    By Güllü Yıldız

    Writing travelogues, safarnāmahs, about general expeditions and for hajj journeys, became popular among Persian intellectuals and statesmen in the Qajar era (1795–1925). This chapter, dealing with various hajj travelogues from that period, will focus on conveying the impressions of Persian pilgrims who chose the Istanbul route, on the city’s gardens, including palace, house, and public gardens and promenades. In general, pilgrims narrated their visits to these gardens with detailed descriptions of their architecture, flora, and social and cultural uses.

    This chapter also aims to reach some conclusions about how they saw and perceived Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire through the medium of their narratives about gardens, by taking into consideration the relationship between place and culture as one of the elements in which individual and collective identities were constructed. It will aim to demonstrate that Ottoman gardens were seen by Persian pilgrims as a sign of ‘progress’ during the second half of the nineteenth and at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Keywords: Istanbul, Ottoman gardens, hajj travelogues, Qajar era, pilgrims
    Entangled Relations over Geographical and Gendered Space: Multi-Component Personal Ornaments at HasanluTaken from Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East edited by Silvana Di Paolo. Pages 51-61.Download
    By Megan Cifarelli

    Hasanlu, in Northwestern Iran, is best known for its catastrophic destruction ca. 800 BC, likely at the hands of the Urartian army. Excavations of the site revealed more than 100 burials from the period leading up to the destruction, Hasanlu Period IVb (1050–800 BC). Among these burials are five adult women decorated with multicomponent personal ornaments consisting of repurposed copper alloy or iron armour scales with attached garment pins, stone, shell and composite beads, and copper alloy tubes of various lengths. If worn on the body during life, these objects would have been both visually and aurally conspicuous. Bead and tube elements are typical of the material culture of Hasanlu, used in mortuary jewellery from the Middle Bronze Age forward. The armour scales, however, are found only in these few female burials at Hasanlu. In the broader ancient Near East, scale armour is associated with representations of male bodies in military contexts, and is found archaeologically in military, palatial, cultic and mortuary contexts. These particular scales are characteristic of regions to Hasanlu’s north (the South Caucasus) and east (the Caspian littoral). This paper proposes that the creation of composite objects from these parts— fragments of masculine armour, components of personal adornment, and sound making tubes—entangled people and things across gendered and geographical boundaries.
    Visualizing cityscapes of Classical antiquity: from early modern reconstruction drawings to digital 3D modelsWith a case study from the ancient town of Koroneia in Boeotia, Greece by Chiara Piccoli. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 53 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918897. £59.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918903. Book contents pageDownload
    The amount of 3D modelling applications in archaeology has increased enormously over the last decade. 3D recording techniques allow researchers to quickly and accurately document archaeological evidence, and 3D reconstructions have created new possibilities to communicate the results to a larger public. In this latter case, however, numerous scholars have expressed their concern regarding the ethics of such digital representations, since they give prominence to a crystallized image of the past and do not account for the complexity of the archaeological record. The study presented here aims to make a practical contribution to a new understanding and use of 3D reconstructions, namely as ‘laboratories’ to test hypotheses and visualize, evaluate and discuss alternative interpretations.

    In order to do so, an analysis of visual reconstructions of the early and late modern period is presented first, followed by a discussion of current applications of 3D digital reconstructions, with a special focus on cityscapes. Lastly, a practical implementation of a research-driven, intellectually transparent and GIS-based 3D reconstruction is proposed for the urban site of Koroneia, in Boeotia, Central Greece. Specifically, the methodology developed in this work uses tools that are employed in geo-design and modern urban planning in an innovative way, integrating GIS with a rule-based modelling approach. With a strong focus on the automation and iteration of the reconstruction process, our 3D visualization provides an intuitive insight into hidden relationships and associations among data, and allows the creation and evaluation of alternative reconstruction hypotheses.
    About the Author
    CHIARA PICCOLI is an Italian archaeologist currently employed as a staff member of the Digital Archaeology Research group at the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden, The Netherlands. Her expertise lies in the applications of 3D modelling techniques and 2D-3D GIS to visualize and analyse archaeological evidence. Her research interests include urban studies, visual studies, and the exploitation of digital tools and new technologies for documentation, visualization, analysis and dissemination. She has participated in several excavations and surveys in Italy, Greece and Morocco. Chiara holds a BA in Cultural Heritage (University of Trento), an MA in Greek and Roman Archaeology (University of Siena) and an MA in Book and Digital Media Studies (Leiden University). She received the Tiele-Stichting Thesis Prize 2011 for the best MA dissertation in the field of Book History in the Netherlands.
    New Proposal for the Location of Ancient Turanu (URU tu-ra-nu)Taken from Ash-sharq: Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 2 No 1 edited by Laura Battini. Pages 83-84.Download
    By Adonice-Ackad Baaklini

    The city Turanu (URU tu-ra-nu) is one of the cities conquered by Tiglath-pileser III during his repression of the rebellion leaded by Azriau (king of Hamath?) in the northern part of Hamath and some northern Phoenician states in 738 BCE (RINAP 1: Tiglath-pileser III, 43, ii 16-24; the city is quoted l. 23). Based on the geographical context and the phonological rapprochement, Turmanin (scientific transcription from arabic: turmānīn) was proposed as a candidate for locating the ancient city (Lipinski 2000: 296; quoted also in Bagg 2007: 262).
    Creativity versus Taboo in Late Bronze Age Central and Southeast EuropeTaken from Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. Pages 39-54.Download
    By Carola Metzner-Nebelsick

    Creativity is clearly a strong force affecting material culture in general. Nonetheless, when one considers Bronze Age artefacts, it is surprising that over a long course of time certain artefact types in fact change very little. They are thus easily identified as belonging to the Bronze Age - a period lasting nearly for 1500 years. In this contribution I focus on two aspects of creativity: the aesthetic and the technical. I also try to address the phenomenon of traditionalism, which in my view is a prominent feature of the Bronze Age. Tradition is marked by a group of artefact types which, in contrast to creativity and innovation, retain their form and function over centuries within the otherwise changing aesthetic concepts of Bronze Age cultures in Europe. These traditional aspects can, in part, be seen as deliberate and therefore as a taboo concerning creative approaches towards materials and artefacts. I try to explore why these patterns and this obvious dichotomy exist. In order to better understand what is special about creativity in Late Bronze Age Central and Southeast Europe I want to begin by reviewing developments in the Early and Middle Bronze Age.
    Creativity and KnowledgeTaken from Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. Pages 5-17.Download
    By Bengt Molander

    The most dominant modern epistemologies focus on human beliefs and theories about the world and take texts as the ultimate expressions of knowledge. I will sketch an alternative epistemological framework, suited for understanding skill and insight (‘knowledge’) in human creative practices. In this framework human actions and made objects are seen as a basic expression of knowledge, not reducible to, or inferior to, linguistic expressions. Skill and insight in human practices, I will argue, are to be understood as forms of attentiveness in practice, and ‘good knowledge’ is what leads to the best for human beings. Attentiveness lives by differences, seeing differences and producing differences, for example in the form of art or craft objects. I will explore this as an epistemological framework for understanding both creative practices in a (pre)historic setting and contemporary creative answers to, or continuations of, old practices.
    Guilty or Innocent? The Buckingham vs. Bankes Libel Trial of 1826Taken from Lost and Now Found: Explorers, Diplomats and Artists in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke and Vanessa Daubney. Pages 183-203.Download
    By Don Boyer

    The early 19th-century English traveller and adventurer William John Bankes spent almost five years visiting and recording ancient sites in the Levant. He was in Egypt and Nubia for much of this time, but he also visited Palestine and Syria. While in Palestine, in early 1816, he made a short side trip to Jerash (Jarash) and Umm Qais (Gadara) east of the Jordan, in the company of James Silk Buckingham. The trip proved to be historically interesting but was otherwise unremarkable in the context of his other travels; however, there were unexpected ramifications.
    London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload
    London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

    Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

    The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.
    About the Authors
    JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

    LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

    JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

    TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.
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    Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918491. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918507. Book contents pageDownload

    While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

    During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

    About the Author
    STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
    Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918354. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918361. Book contents pageDownload

    The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

    About the Editors
    DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

    ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

    DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
    Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist edited by Beverley Ballin Smith. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917708. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917715. Book contents pageDownload

    The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

    Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

    About the Editor
    BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.
    KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload

    The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

    Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

    The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

    Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

    About the Author
    Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

    Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

    Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

    His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.
    Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload

    The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

    La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.

    EDITORES
    SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

    Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

    Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
    Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload
    The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

    La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.
    EDITORES
    SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

    Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

    Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
    SOMA 2015: Time, Space and PeopleProceedings of the 19th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology edited by Murat Arslan. iv+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (69 colour plates). 49 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918514. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918521. Book contents pageDownload
    The 19th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Kemer/Antalya (Turkey) from the 12th to the 14th of November, 2015. As has been the case in the past, this symposium continues to provide an important opportunity for scholars and researchers to come together and discuss their academic studies in a friendly and supportive atmosphere. The proceedings of SOMA 2015 contain eighteen interdisciplinary articles on themes from underwater archaeology to history, archaeometry and art history, and chronologically, the subjects of these articles range from the Bronze Age to the 20th century.
    About the Editor
    Murat Arslan is the editor of SOMA 2015. He is professor of Ancient History at Akdeniz University in Antalya (Turkey). He is interested in Ancient Greek and Ancient History, especially the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and historiography. In addition to his monographs (Galatians, Mithradates VI Eupator, Classical and Hellenistic History of Byzantion), his translations and commentaries on periplus (Arrianus, Ps. Scylax), and Memnon of Heracleia Pontica, he is the current editor in chief of several international journals (Cedrus, MJH, Phaselis, Libri).
    Who Owns the Past?Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction edited by Maja Gori (editor-in-chief). 123 pages; full colour throughout. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917630. £25.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2531-8810-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload
    The second issue of Ex Novo hosts papers exploring the various ways in which the past is remembered, recovered, created and used. In particular, contributions discuss the role of archaeology in present-day conflict areas and its function as peacekeeping tool or as trigger point for military action.
    Le classi ceramiche della “tradizione mista” a Kos nel Tardo Bronzo IA by Salvatore Vitale. 208 pages; illustrations in colour and black & white. Italian text.. 51 2018. ISBN 9781784918859. Download
    This volume focuses on the pottery classes of the “Entangled Tradition” recovered at the settlement of the “Serraglio” on Kos during the late Bronze Age and into the Iron Age. The results reveal new information on the chronology, typology, and decoration of Koan Painted Fine (PF) and Koan Painted Medium-Coarse to Coarse (PMC-C), ceramics. Moreover, the fresh analysis of the chaîne opératoire used to manufacture these classes and the assessment of consumption patterns contribute to a wider understanding of the socio-cultural and political implications of the Koan pottery assemblage during the early part of the late Bronze Age.

    The data presented in this volume indicate that PF and PMC-C ceramics represent a unique case of fully entangled classes in the Aegean, which merged features of the Koan “Local Tradition” with characteristics of the Minoan and Minoanizing potting traditions of Crete and the Cyclades into a new technological and stylistic language. Contacts between these different cultures are explained based on the theoretical model provided by “human mobility”. The specific Koan cultural synthesis, however, was endorsed and promoted by the local elites at the settlement of the “Serraglio”, which aimed to participate in the “new environment” determined by the economic and cultural expansion of Neopalatial Crete.

    In this respect, the manufacture of Koan Entangled classes served a dual scope. On the one hand, using transport containers made in the PMC-C class, Koan products were exported and exchanged throughout the Aegean. In addition, the finer vessels of the Koan “Entangled Tradition” were utilized for promoting Minoan-type social practices at the “Serraglio”. Through these practices, Koan elites aimed to redefine their identity and portray an image of higher status within the local social arena.
    About the Author
    Dr. Salvatore Vitale completed his MA in Classical Literatures and PhD in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa in 2001 and 2007 respectively, under the supervision of Professors M. Benzi and Giampaolo Graziadio. After completion of his PhD, Dr. Vitale held post-doctoral and research fellowships at the Universities of Calabria, Cincinnati, and Pisa and at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens.

    Since 2009, he has been the director of the “Serraglio, Eleona, and Langada Archaeological Project” (SELAP), a research endeavor carried out under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological School at Athens. The main goal of SELAP is to provide new information on the island of Kos from the Final Neolithic until the Late Protogeometric period.
    Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran ArtProceedings of the First International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 23rd-24th March, 2017 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 419 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918552. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918569. Book contents pageDownload
    Since the beginning of Gandhāran studies in the nineteenth century, chronology has been one of the most significant challenges to the understanding of Gandhāran art. Many other ancient societies, including those of Greece and Rome, have left a wealth of textual sources which have put their fundamental chronological frameworks beyond doubt. In the absence of such sources on a similar scale, even the historical eras cited on inscribed Gandhāran works of art have been hard to place. Few sculptures have such inscriptions and the majority lack any record of find-spot or even general provenance. Those known to have been found at particular sites were sometimes moved and reused in antiquity. Consequently, the provisional dates assigned to extant Gandhāran sculptures have sometimes differed by centuries, while the narrative of artistic development remains doubtful and inconsistent.

    Building upon the most recent, cross-disciplinary research, debate and excavation, this volume reinforces a new consensus about the chronology of Gandhāra, bringing the history of Gandhāran art into sharper focus than ever. By considering this tradition in its wider context, alongside contemporary Indian art and subsequent developments in Central Asia, the authors also open up fresh questions and problems which a new phase of research will need to address.
    Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art is the first publication of the Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre, which has been supported by the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation. It presents the proceedings of the first of three international workshops on fundamental questions in the study of Gandhāran art, held at Oxford in March 2017.
    About the Editors
    WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

    PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
    Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload
    The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

    The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.
    About the Author
    Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.
    Spanish description:
    El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

    Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
    A Roman aqueduct through the Cretan highlands – securing the water supply for elevated LyttosTaken from Great Waterworks in Roman Greece edited by Georgia A. Aristodemou and Theodosios P. Tassios. Pages 147-169.Download
    By Amanda Kelly

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    Easter Island toolsBRISBANE, AUSTRALIA—CNNreports that Dale Simpson, Jr., of the University of Queensland and colleagues think the idea that Easter Island’s Rapa Nui culture collapsed due to overuse of resources and competition to build the stone carvings known as moai may be overstated. Jo Anne Van Tilburg of the Easter Island Statue Project led a team that recently excavated four of Easter Island’s moai and uncovered more than 1,500 volcanic stone basalt carving tools. Chemical analysis of 17 of the recovered tools, which are known as toki, found that most of them came from one of three quarry complexes on the island. Simpson says this focused effort in one quarry points to craft specialization, information exchange, and cooperation among the Rapa Nui to produce the nearly one thousand statues, thought to represent important Rapa Nui ancestors. Van Tilburg cautions, however, that such focused labor may have been coerced, and more study is needed. To read about archaeological evidence of collaboration in Mesoamerica, go to “Kings of Cooperation.”


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    Bulgaria Philippopolis OdeonPLOVDIV, BULGARIA—The Sofia Globe reports that archaeologists working in the eastern part of the agora in the ancient city of Philippopolis have uncovered a 30-foot stretch of the Cardo Maximus, or main street. They also unearthed large fragments of the main façade, columns, and architectural elements of the Odeon, which had three or four entrances and a portico. Fragments of a marble statue of a prominent citizen named Sozipatar were also recovered. Text on the fragments indicate Sozipatar was given the right to sit in the theater’s front row. The building, which had been originally used by Philippopolis’s city council, was destroyed by an earthquake in the medieval period. To read about another recent Roman-era discovery in Bulgaria, go to “Mirror, Mirror.”


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    Iraq repatriated artifactLONDON, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Guardian, a collection of eight ancient artifacts seized by the London Metropolitan police from an antiquities dealer have been repatriated to Iraq, based upon an identification made by scholars at the British Museum. Cuneiform inscriptions on the 5,000-year-old ceramics named a Sumerian king, a temple, and a dedication, which indicated they had been taken from Iraq’s ancient city of Girsu. British Museum archaeologist Sebastian Rey and his Iraqi colleagues were able to find the holes in the Eninnu temple’s mudbrick walls that had held the objects, and broken pieces at the site that had been discarded by the looters. “This is a very happy outcome,” commented St. John Simpson, assistant keeper at the museum’s Middle East department, “nothing like this has happened for a very, very long time if ever.” To read in-depth about cuneiform tablets, go to “The World's Oldest Writing.”


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    via Facebook: The Vietnam Maritime Archaeology Project needs your help! In 2016 and 2017 the VMAP team identified a neolithic site (estimated 3000BP) at a modern burial ground at Minh Chau on Quan Lan Island. In 2018 the team carried out limited excavations to gain an understanding of the deposit and it boundaries. VMAP needs […]

    The post Appeal from the Vietnam Maritime Archaeology Project appeared first on SEAArch - Southeast Asian Archaeology.


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    Groupe "Ars grammatica", Priscien. Grammaire Livre XVIII Syntaxe 2, Paris, 2018.

    Éditeur : Vrin
    Collection : Histoire des doctrines de l'antiquité classique
    552 pages
    ISBN : 978-2-7116-2773-8
    52 €

    Avec le livre 18 de la Grammaire de Priscien se poursuit la traduction de cette somme de la grammaire antique dont l'auteur enseignait la langue latine à Constantinople au début du VIe siècle.
    Ce livre, le dernier et le plus long, achève l'analyse inaugurée avec le livre 17 et consacrée à la syntaxe, qui constitue l'aboutissement de l'œuvre. Priscien s'y inspire encore, quoique de façon plus lâche, du programme élaboré par le grammairien alexandrin Apollonius Dyscole dans sa Syntaxe, et l'analyse se concentre ici sur la constitution du noyau de l'énoncé complet, envisagée du double point de vue du nom et du verbe.
    Au milieu de ce livre, Priscien s'affranchit cependant de la progression thématique et des analyses de son modèle grec, pour entamer un développement d'un genre entièrement nouveau par rapport au reste de l'œuvre : un catalogue de constructions grecques et latines comparées, en 340 notices indépendantes, inspiré des multiples index bilingues suscités par la présence romaine en territoire hellénophone.
    Le présent volume rend compte de l'originalité et de l'hétérogénéité de ce livre singulier, dans son organisation comme dans le traitement de ses diverses sources. Certains aspects de ses analyses forment de véritables nœuds dans l'histoire des théories linguistiques, comme l'interprétation du concept stoïcien de prédicat ou le traitement des modes subjonctif et optatif. D'autres innovations relèvent des objectifs pédagogiques d'une œuvre que Priscien destinait à un public universitaire bilingue. Surtout, la constante mise en scène de la continuité entre le grec et le latin donne lieu à une impressionnante quantité de citations littéraires, parfois issues de textes perdus par ailleurs, qui font de l'Ars Prisciani un hommage de l'Antiquité tardive à la littérature gréco-latine classique.
    L'ouvrage comporte une introduction générale, le texte latin accompagné des loci similes, une traduction annotée, une bibliographie sélective et des index (auteurs et citations, terminologie grammaticale latine et grecque, notions grammaticales).

     

    Source : Librairie Vrin


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    As part of a special issue on advances in art crime research, open-access journal Arts has published my study of metal detecting for cultural objects until ‘there is nothing left’: the potential and limits of digital data, netnographic data and market data for analysis. I would particularly like to thank the peer-reviewers for enduring and […]

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  • 08/14/18--02:48: Deceitful Design
  • I shared an interview with Dennis Venema on Facebook, highlighting this quote from the piece: [T]he evidence is everywhere. It’s not just that a piece here and there fits evolution: it’s the fact that virtually none of the evidence we have suggests anything else. What you see presented as “problems for evolution” by Christian anti-evolutionary […]

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Bratislava City Museum Ancient Gerulata
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    exhibition
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018

    Lecture: Ancient Gerulata 

    Lecture and worksheets: Exhibition of Jewells of burials of  Cemetery III.

    Location

    Name: 
    Jaroslava Schmidtova
    Call for Papers: 
    no

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    Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet...

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    It is with great sadness that I inform you that Christian Habicht, one of the greatest servants of Greek Epigraphy, passed away on August 6, 2018. A link to the obituary published on the website of the Institute for Advanced Study, where Prof. Habicht served for almost a quarter of a century, can be found here.

    Nikolaos Papazarkadas (President of ASGLE)


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    Alongside my study of the potential and limits of digital data, netnographic data and market data (which is summarised in another blog post), there are two other articles that explore the potential and limits of open-source research, in a special issue of Arts on advances in art crime research. One addresses analysis of factors that […]

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    Those 'discovery-focussed' academics intent on poo-pooing the conservation-based concerns of the critics of PAS-supporter-fluff might do well to have a look at the next piece of work by Sam Hardy (Hardy, S A. 2018: “Metal detecting for cultural objects until ‘there is nothing left’: The potential and limits of digital data, netnographic data and market data for analysis”. Arts, Volume 7, Number 3. Available at: https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7030040). It is a substantial piece of work and adds detail to his earlier study (the one the Ixelles Six/Helsinki Gang incautiously and to their shame tried to trash).*  Here is the abstract:
    abstract This methodological study assesses the potential for automatically generated data, netnographic data and market data on metal-detecting to advance cultural property criminology. The method comprises the analysis of open sources that have been identified through multilingual searches of Google Scholar, Google Web and Facebook. Results show significant differences between digital data and market data. These demonstrate the limits of restricted quantitative analysis of online forums and the limits of extrapolation of market data with “culture-bound” measures. Regarding the validity of potential quantitative methods, social networks as well as online forums are used differently in different territories. Restricted quantitative analysis, and its foundational assumption of a constant relationship between the size of the largest online forum and the size of the metal-detecting population, are unsound. It is necessary to conduct extensive quantitative analysis, then to make tentative “least worst” estimates. As demonstrated in the sample territories, extensive analyses may provide empirical data, which revise established estimates. In this sample, they corroborate the detecting community’s own perception that they are ‘beat[ing these sites] to death’.
    Sam also summarises it on his blog, where, in addition to all the other useful information, one may glean the snippet:
    'in an affluent Western country, the average metal-detectorist may consume 0.32 metal-detectors per year '
    So rather like computers and the like I guess. This takes me back to the days when I tried to determine how many detectorists the PAS propaganda of success was not talking of and two metal detector dealers gave me their take on the market size and revealed that they were not as interested in the total numbers sold as much as the number of detectorists who'd be coming back to buy another machine in the near future. 

    Anyway, the Ixelles Six are a bit tardy in responding to Hardy's answer to their obfuscatory hatchet-job (some of them at this moment are tramping around Lapland looking at what they say is Nazi pottery, an important task, no doubt, that will delay them addressing this issue). Now it seems they have another headache to deal with. 

    Hardy, S A. 2017: “Quantitative analysis of open-source data on metal detecting for cultural property: Estimation of the scale and intensity of metal detecting and the quantity of metal-detected cultural goods”. Cogent Social Sciences, Volume 3, Number 1. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2017.1298397


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    The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus...

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    [First posted 1 July 2010. Most recently updated 14 August 2018]

    Oracc: The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus Projects List

     Oracc banner
    Oracc is a collaborative effort to develop a complete corpus of cuneiform whose rich annotation and open licensing support the next generation of scholarly research. Created by Steve Tinney, Oracc is steered by Jamie Novotny, Eleanor Robson, Tinney, and Niek Veldhuis.

    Idrimi: Statue of Idrimi

    The statue of Idrimi in the British Museum (detail)
    An up-to-date, searchable edition of the Idrimi inscription together with numerous annotations and bibliography. By Jacob Lauinger at Johns Hopkins University.

    akklove: Akkadian Love Literature

    AkkLove presents all early Akkadian literary texts related to love and sex known to date. The project is based on Wasserman, Akkadian Love Literature of the Third and Second Millennium BCE ( LAOS 4), Harrassowitz, 2016, where commentary to the texts and an introduction to the corpus are found.

    AMGG: Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses

    Detail of Old Babylonian clay plaque, known as the Burney Relief or the "Queen of the Night" showing a naked goddess, perhaps Inana or Ereškigal. © The British Museum.
    Offers information about the fifty most important Mesopotamian gods and goddesses and provides starting points for further research.
    Directed by Nicole Brisch and funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2011.

    ARMEP: Ancient Records of Middle Eastern Polities

    ARMEP, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which ancient records of Middle Eastern polities (especially those of the first millennium BC) are edited.
    The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. ARMEP is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

    ARRIM Digital Archive: Digital Archive of the Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia

    Through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ARRIM Digital Archive makes all nine issues of “The Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia" (1983-1991) freely available in searchable PDF files.
    This digital archive is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

    blms: Bilinguals in Late Mesopotamian Scholarship

    Long after Sumerian had died out as a spoken language, bilingual (Sumerian - Akkadian) texts still played a prominent role in the scholarly culture of Babylonia and Assyria. BLMS provides editions of bilingual narrative texts, hymns, proverbs, prayers, rituals, and incantations dating to the first millennium BCE.
    Project Director: Steve Tinney; Editor: Jeremiah Peterson. With the assistance of Niek Veldhuis, Jamie Novotny, Joshua Jeffers, and Ilona Zsolnay. BLMS is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    CAMS: Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship

    Three clay figurines of protective apkallu-sages dressed in fish-cloaks, from 7th-century Nineveh (BM ME 91837)
    Editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings, contributed by many different people and projects.

    CAMS/Anzu

    Front cover of State Archives of Assyria, vol. 3
    Composite transliterations of the Epic of Anzu, prepared by Amar Annus for the book The Standard Babylonian Epic of Anzu (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 3), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001. Lemmatisation by Philip Jones.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    CAMS/Barutu

    The obverse of the Old Babylonian liver model BM 92668.
    Texts on extispicy (divination by the entrails of sacrificed animals). Currently contains only the Old Babylonian liver model BM 92668. The ordering of the omens was determined by Ruth Horry, the transliteration and translation made by Eleanor Robson.

    CAMS/Etana: The Standard Babylonian Epic of Etana

    Provides fully searchable manuscript transliterations of the Old Babylonian, Middle Assyrian and Neo-Assyrian versions of the Etana epic, prepared by Jamie Novotny for the book The Standard Babylonian Etana Epic (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 2), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns

    CAMS/GKAB: CAMS Geography of Knowledge Corpus

    Drawing of a detail from a tablet describing how to make a ritual kettle drum from a bull's hide, Uruk c.200 BC (TCL 6, 47)
    Editions of scholarly tablets from Huzirina, Kalhu, and Uruk for the Geography of Knowledge project, comprising editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings.
    Project directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, 2007-12.

    CAMS/Ludlul

    Front cover of State Archives of Assyria, vol. 7
    Score and manuscript transliterations of Ludlul bēl nēmeqi, prepared by Amar Annus and Alan Lenzi for the book Ludlul Bēl Nēmeqi: The Standard Babylonian Poem of the Righteous Sufferer(State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 7), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2010.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    CAMS/SelBI: CAMS/Seleucid Building Inscriptions

    Close-up of lapis-coloured glazed bricks in the remains of the Irigal temple in Uruk, 2001. Photo by Eleanor Robson.
    Third-century BC building inscriptions, from Borsippa and Uruk. Edition of the Antiochus (Borsippa) Cylinder by Kathryn Stevens; edition of the Anu-uballiṭs' inscriptions from Uruk by Eleanor Robson.

    HIST3109: Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia

    Imaginary reconstruction of the Etemenanki ziggurat in Babylon
    Editions and translations of texts for the UCL Undergraduate Special Subject in History, Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia (HIST3109), academic year 2017-18. Compiled by Eleanor Robson at UCL.

    CASPo: Corpus of Akkadian Shuila-Prayers online

    CCPo: Cuneiform Commentaries Project on ORACC

    Provides fully searchable, annotated editions of text commentaries written by Assyrian and Babylonian scholars between the eighth and second centuries BCE. The texts commented on include literary, magical, divinatory, medical, legal, and lexical works.
    Project Director: Eckart Frahm; Co-Director: Enrique Jiménez; Senior Editor: Mary Frazer.

    CDLI: The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative

    CDLI image of Proto-Cuneiform tablet from Uruk, W20367
    The foundational online cataloging and archiving project for the cuneiform corpus, directed by Bob Englund at UCLA. The Oracc presentation is based directly on public CDLI data which is updated nightly.

    CKST: Corpus of Kassite Sumerian Texts

    Votive eye dedicated by the Kassite king Kurigalzu to the god Zababa. (Louvre, AO 23994)
    Editions of Sumerian Kassite texts: Royal Inscriptions, Literary, and Lexical texts.

    CMAwRo: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals

    Head of an Assyrian woman (© Trustees of the British Museum)
    CMAwRo presents online critical editions of Mesopotamian rituals and incantations against witchcraft.
    The DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse" is directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).

    CMAwRo: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals

    Head of an Assyrian woman (© Trustees of the British Museum)
    CMAwRo presents online critical editions of Mesopotamian rituals and incantations against witchcraft. The text editions and translations are derived from the Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals (CMAwR; vol. 1, Brill: 2011).
    The DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse" is directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).

    cmawro/cmawr2: cmawro/CMAwRo 2

    cmawro/maqlu: cmawro/UPIEL94

    Contrib: Contributions

    Data contributed to Oracc for reuse by others, normally under the CC BY-SA license.

    Amarna: The Amarna Texts

    Shrine-stela of Amenhotep III and queen Tiye (detail), Amarna c.1340 BC. (British Museum EA 57399)
    Contributed by Shlomo Izre'el, the Amarna corpus comprises transliterations of the 380 cuneiform tablets found at Tell el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten) in Egypt. It contains diplomatic correspondence and Akkadian scholarly works from the mid-14th century BC.

    contrib/lambert: The Notebooks of W.G. Lambert

    Image of part of Lambert Folio 9034, the first page of Notebook 2
    W. G. Lambert (1926-2011) was an Assyriologist who spent much of his research time transliterating and copying cuneiform tablets in museums, especially the British Museum. His Nachlass included eight notebooks filled with handwritten transliterations of Babylonian and Assyrian texts. The notebooks contain more than five thousand transliterations, spread over nearly fifteen hundred pages. They are an astonishing record of sustained first-hand engagement with cuneiform tablets.

    CTIJ: Cuneiform Texts Mentioning Israelites, Judeans, and Other Related Groups

    Judean captives leaving the city of Lachish to exile, ca. 701 BC.
    Cuneiform texts and onomastic data pertaining to Israelites, Judeans, and related population groups during the Neo-Assyrian, Neo- and Late Babylonian, and Achaemenid Periods (744-330 BCE).
    Project directed by Ran Zadok and Yoram Cohen, and funded by the "Ancient Israel" (New Horizons) Research Program of Tel Aviv University.

    DCCLT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts

    Drawing of a list of vessels from Archaic Uruk, circa 3500 BCE
    Editions and translations of lexical texts (word lists and sign lists) from all periods of cuneiform writing
    Project directed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley and supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    DCCLT/ebla: DCCLT/Ebla Lexical Texts

    Decorations from the palace at Ebla
    Editions and translation of the unilingual and bilingual lexical texts from Ebla (ca. 2300 BCE). The editions were prepared by Marco Bonechi (Rome) and transformed for publication in DCCLT by Niek Veldhuis.

    dcclt/Jena: dcclt/Lexical Texts in the Hilprecht Collection, Jena

    Editions and translation of lexical texts from Nippur now in the Frau Professor Hilprecht Collection of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. Editions by John Carnahan and Niek Veldhuis (Berkeley) with the assistance of Jay Chrisostomo (Ann Arbor), Kai Lämmerhirt, and Manfred Krebernik (Jena). Supported by a Mellon Project Grant of the Division of Arts and Humanities of the University of California at Berkeley.

    DCCLT/Nineveh: DCCLT/Lexical Texts in the Royal Libraries at Nineveh

    Horned bull and archaizing sign list.
    Nineveh provides editions of the lexical texts in the royal tablet collections discovered in the Assyrian capital. The project is supported by the NEH and was carried out in cooperation with the British Museum.

    DCCLT/signlists: DCCLT/Reading the Signs

    Editions and translations of all cuneiform sign lists from the middle of the third millennium B.C.E. until the end of cuneiform culture. The project is supported by the NEH.
    Project directed by Niek Veldhuis. Editions by Emmanuelle Salgues, C. Jay Crisostomo, and John Carnahan.

    DCCMT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts

    Photo of an Old Babylonian school exercise on calculating the area of a triangle (Ashmolean 1931.91)
    Catalogue of around a thousand published cuneiform mathematical tablets, with several hundred transliterations and translations.
    Project run by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

    ETCSRI: Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Royal Inscriptions

    Sculpted head of Gudea of Lagash with turban in the Louvre (AO 13). Photo by Gábor Zólyomi
    An annotated, grammatically and morphologically analyzed, transliterated, trilingual (Sumerian-English-Hungarian), parallel corpus of all Sumerian royal inscriptions.
    Directed by Gábor Zólyomi at Eötvos Loránd University, Budapest and funded by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA).

    Geonames: Geographical Names in Oracc

    Glass: Corpus of Glass Technological Texts

    This project provides editions and translations for cuneiform technological recipes. The texts include Assyrian and Babylonian tablets that provide instructions for producing glass that imitates precious stones and procedures for processing perfumed oils. Directed by Eduardo A. Escobar at UC Berkeley

    HBTIN: Hellenistic Babylonia: Texts, Iconography, Names

       A personal seal stamped into a cuneiform tablet from Hellenistic Uruk (BM 105203, detail).
    Cuneiform texts, iconography and onomastic data from Hellenistic Babylonia, primarily from Uruk. HBTIN texts form the demonstrator corpus of the Berkeley Prosopography Service (BPS).
    Directed by Laurie Pearce at UC Berkeley.

    ISSL: The Index to the Sumerian Secondary Literature

    Over 70,000 references to the Sumerian secondary literature which also indexes all of the transliterations of word writings in ePSD.

    LaOCOST: Law and Order: Cuneiform Online Sustainable Tool

    This project illuminates how issues of law and gender were practiced in the ancient Near East, utilizing a digital corpus of legal and non-legal texts as its database. LaOCOST is directed by Ilan Peled.

    LoveLyrics: A corpus of 1st mill. love rituals involving Marduk, Zarpanitum and Ištar

    Edition of the corpus of 1st-millennium-BCE texts from Assyria and Babylonia with rituals and verbal ceremonies involving Marduk, Zarpanitu and Ištar of Babylon. By Rocío Da Riva (Universitat de Barcelona) and Nathan Wasserman (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem).
    Photo: Clay plaque (87.160.79) depicting a goddess lying on a wedding bed, probably Ištar. © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

    Nimrud: Nimrud: Materialities of Assyrian Knowledge Production

    The Assyrian city of Nimrud, as re-imagined by its first excavator, Austen Henry Layard (detail).
    A portal to all things related to the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud (Kalhu/Calah), on Oracc and beyond. Explores how scientific and historical knowledge is made from archaeological objects.
    Directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

    OBMC: Old Babylonian Model Contracts

    OBMC Logo
    Edition of the Corpus of Old Babylonian Model Contracts by Gabriella Spada.

    OBTA: Old Babylonian Tabular Accounts

    Photo of southern Iraqi farm by ER
    A catalogue and corpus of Old Babylonian tabular accounts by Eleanor Robson at University College London. Additions and corrections welcome.

    OGSL: Oracc Global Sign List

    LAK 25, from A. Deimel, Liste der Archaische Keilschriftzeichen.
    Provides a global registry of sign names, variants and readings for use by Oracc.
    Managed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley.

    OIMEA: Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity

    OIMEA, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which official inscriptions are edited.
    The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. OIMEA is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

    PNAo: Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire online

    Cover of PNA 3/II
    Provides a collection of additions and corrections to the printed fascicles of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. A separate section is devoted to new information about Neo-Assyrian eponym officials. Compiled by Heather D. Baker at the University of Toronto.

    Qcat: The Q Catalogue

    The letter Q; icon of the Orac Qcat project.
    Provides a global registry of compositions rather than objects, supporting the creation of scores on Oracc.
    Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

    RIAo: Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online

    This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Assyrian royal inscriptions, texts that were published in RIMA 1-3 and RINAP 1 and 3-4. This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
    RIAo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Kirk Grayson, Nathan Morello, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

    RIBo: Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online

    This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Babylonian royal inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC). This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Rocío Da Riva and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
    RIBo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus, Rocío Da Riva, Grant Frame, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

    Scores: Scores of the Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

    This sub-project presently includes score transliterations of the official inscriptions of Nabopolassar and Neriglissar. The ‘Babylon 7 Scores’ project will also include the scores of the royal inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II and Nabonidus.
    Jamie Novotny adapted the scores contributed by Rocío Da Riva, which she had published in her The Inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amel-Marduk and Neriglissar (SANER 3).

    Babylon 10: The Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter

    This sub-project includes an edition of the Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter (281-261 BC).
    Kathryn Stevens contributed the lemmatized edition; Jamie Novotny made minor stylistic changes to the edition and lemmatization.

    Babylon 2: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin

    This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin (ca. 1157-1026 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69.
    Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

    Babylon 3: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand

    This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand (ca. 1025-1005 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 70-77.
    Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

    Babylon 4: The Inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty

    This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty (ca. 1004-985 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 78-86.
    Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

    Babylon 5: The Inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty

    This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty (ca. 984-979 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 87-89.
    Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

    Babylon 6: The Inscriptions of the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties

    This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties "Uncertain Dynasties" (978-626 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69 and Leichty, RINAP 4.
    Grant Frame and Erle Leichty contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny updated and lemmatized the editions.

    Babylon 7: The Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

    This sub-project presently includes editions of some of the official inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (625-539 BC), texts of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, and Neriglissar published by Da Riva. The ‘Babylon 7’ project will also include the inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II and Nabonidus.
    Rocío Da Riva contributed the transliterations; Jamie Novotny adapted the editions, wrote a few of the content pages, and lemmatized the inscriptions; and Alexa Bartelmus prepared most of the informational pages.

    Babylon 8: The Inscriptions of Cyrus II and His Successors

    This sub-project presently includes editions of three of Akkadian inscriptions of the Persian ruler Cyrus II (559-530 BC). The ‘Babylon 8’ project will eventually include other Akkadian, Elamite, and Old Persian inscriptions of Cyrus II and his successors.
    Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny adapted the editions from I. Finkel, The Cyrus Cylinder. The King of Persia's Proclamation from Ancient Babylon and H. Schaudig, Die Inschriften Nabonids von Babylon und Kyros' des Großen.

    Sources: Sources for Inscriptions of the Rulers of Babylonia

    This sub-project presently includes object transliterations of the inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, and Neriglissar. The ‘Sources’ project intends to include the transliterations of all of the objects inscribed with inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC).

    Rīm-Anum: The House of Prisoners

    Rīm-Anum, king of Uruk (ca. 1741–1739 BC) revolted against Samsuiluna of Babylon, son of Hammurapi, and enjoyed a short-lived independence. The archive edited in this project derives from the house of prisoners (bīt asiri) that kept the prisoners of war. The editions and translations were prepared by Andrea Seri and accompanies her book "The House of Prisoners" (2013).
    Buy the bookfrom Harrassowitz.

    RINAP: Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period

    Excavating the Ninurta temple at Kalhu (Nimrud). Watercolor by F.C. Cooper.
    Presents fully searchable, annotated editions of the royal inscriptions of Neo-Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC), Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Sargon II (721-705 BC), Sennacherib (704-681 BC), and Esarhaddon (680-669 BC).
    Directed by Grant Frame at the University of Pennsylvania and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    RINAP 1: Tiglath-pileser III and Shalmaneser V

    Cover image of RINAP 1
    The official inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), kings of Assyria, edited by Hayim Tadmor and Shigeo Yamada.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    RINAP 3: Sennacherib

    Cover image of RINAP 3
    The official inscriptions of Sennacherib (704-681 BC), king of Assyria, edited by A. Kirk Grayson and Jamie Novotny.
    Buy Part 1 from Eisenbrauns and/or Part 2 from Eisenbrauns.

    RINAP 4: Esarhaddon

    Cover of RINAP 4, published by Eisenbrauns
    The official inscriptions of Esarhaddon, king of Assyria (680-669 BC), edited by Erle Leichty.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    RINAP 5: Ashurbanipal and Successors

    The official inscriptions of the Assyrian kings Ashurbanipal (668–ca. 631 BC), Aššur-etel-ilāni (ca. 631–627/626 BC), and Sîn-šarra-iškun (627/626–612 BC), edited by Jamie Novotny, Grant Frame, and Joshua Jeffers.

    RINAP Scores

    This sub-project of RINAP Online includes all fifty-five of the score transliterations published by the RINAP Project (2011-14).

    RINAP Sources

    This sub-project of RINAP Online includes transliterations of the available sources of the editions published by the RINAP Project (2011-15).

    SAAo: State Archives of Assyria Online

    A pair of Assyrian scribes filing reports after the conquest of a Babylonian city, Nimrud, 8th century BC (BM ANE 118882)
    The online counterpart to the State Archives of Assyria series, released with the kind permission of The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project and its director Professor Simo Parpola.
    Associated portal sites include Knowledge and Power and Assyrian Empire Builders.

    Knowledge and Power

    An Assyrian king with his scribes and scholars, as imagined    in the mid-19th century. (A.H. Layard, A Second Series of the Monuments    of Nineveh, London 1853, pl. 2 detail, after a sketch by J.    Fergusson).
    Presents Neo-Assyrian scholars' letters, queries, and reports to their kings in seventh-century Nineveh and provides resources to support their use in undergraduate teaching.
    Directed by Karen Radner at University College London and Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge; funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2007-10.

    SAAo/SAA01: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West

    Cover of published volume S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West (1987)
    The text editions from the book S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West (State Archives of Assyria, 1), 1987 (2015 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA02: Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths

    Cover of published volume S. Parpola and K. Watanabe, Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths (1988)
    The text editions from the book S. Parpola and K. Watanabe, Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths (State Archives of Assyria, 2), 1988 (reprint 2014).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA03: Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea

    Cover of published volume A. Livingstone, Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea (1989)
    The text editions from the book A. Livingstone, Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea (State Archives of Assyria, 3), 1989 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA04: Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria

    Cover of published volume I. Starr, Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria (1990)
    The text editions from the book I. Starr, Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria (State Archives of Assyria, 4), 1990.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA05: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces

    Cover of published volume G. B. Lanfranchi and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces (1990)
    The text editions from the book G. B. Lanfranchi and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 5), 1990 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA06: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon

    Cover of published volume T. Kwasman and S. Parpola, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon (1991)
    The text editions from the book T. Kwasman and S. Parpola, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 6), 1991.
    Out of print.

    SAAo/SAA07: Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration

    Cover of published volume F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration (1992)
    The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 7), 1992 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA08: Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings

    Cover of published volume H. Hunger, Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings (1992)
    The text editions from the book H. Hunger, Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings (State Archives of Assyria, 8), 1992 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA09: Assyrian Prophecies

    Cover of published volume S. Parpola, Assyrian Prophecies (1997)
    The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Assyrian Prophecies (State Archives of Assyria, 9), 1997.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA10: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars

    Cover of published volume S. Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars (1993)
    The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars (State Archives of Assyria, 10), 1993 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA11: Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Militar Administration

    Cover of published volume F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Military Administration (1995)
    The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Military Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 11), 1995.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA12: Grants, Decres and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period

    Cover of published volume L. Kataja and R. Whiting, Grants, Decrees and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period (1995)
    The text editions from the book L. Kataja and R. Whiting, Grants, Decrees and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period (State Archives of Assyria, 12), 1995.
    Out of print.

    SAAo/SAA13: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal

    Cover of published volume S. W. Cole and P. Machinist, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (1998)
    The text editions from the book S. W. Cole and P. Machinist, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (State Archives of Assyria, 13), 1998 (reprint 2014).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA14: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun

    Cover of published volume R. Mattila, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun (2002)
    The text editions from the book R. Mattila, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun (State Archives of Assyria, 14), 2002.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA15: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces

    Cover of published volume A. Fuchs and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces (2001)
    The text editions from the book A. Fuchs and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 15), 2001.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA16: The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon

    Cover of published volume M. Luukko and G. Van Buylaere, The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon (2002)
    The text editions from the book M. Luukko and G. Van Buylaere, The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 16), 2002.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA17: The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib

    Cover of published volume M. Dietrich, The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib (2003)
    The text editions from the book M. Dietrich, The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib (State Archives of Assyria, 17), 2003.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA18: The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia

    Cover of published volume F. S. Reynolds, The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia (2003)
    The text editions from the book F. S. Reynolds, The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia (State Archives of Assyria, 18), 2003.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA19: The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud

    Cover of published volume SAA 19
    The text editions from the book Mikko Luukko, The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud (State Archives of Assyria, 19), 2013.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAA20: Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts

    Cover of published volume SAA 20
    The text editions from the book Simo Parpola, Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts (State Archives of Assyria, 20), 2017.
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    SAAo/SAAS2: SAAo/Assyrian Eponym List

    Cover of published volume A. Millard, The Eponyms of the Assyrian Empire, 910-612 BC (1994)
    The text editions and composite translation from the book A. Millard, The Eponyms of the Assyrian Empire, 910-612 BC (State Archives of Assyria Studies 2), 1994 (2014 reprint).
    Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

    seal/AkkLove: seal/Akkadian Love Literature

    AkkLove presents all early Akkadian literary texts related to love and sex known to date. The project is based on Wasserman, Akkadian Love Literature of the Third and Second Millennium BCE ( LAOS 4), Harrassowitz, 2016, where commentary to the texts and an introduction to the corpus are found.

    Suhu: The Inscriptions of Suhu online

    This project presents annotated editions of the officially commissioned texts of the extant, first-millennium-BC inscriptions of the rulers of Suhu, texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 275-331. The open-access transliterations and translations were made available through the kind permission of Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
    Suhu online is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus and Grant Frame are the primary content contributors.

    Xcat: The X Catalogue

    The X logo of XCat
    Provides a global registry of cuneiform manuscripts, supplementary to CDLI.
    Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

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    Anthony Alcock has deviated from his usual work in Syriac and Coptic to translate one of the ancient Lives of Aesop.  His full introduction explains which, and based on what manuscripts.  This work belongs to the genre of “sayings” or “wisdom” literature (gnomologia); but I presume might also relate to the genre of Saints’ lives.

    This is therefore very valuable to have.  Thank you!


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    Over the weekend, I was in an entertaining Twitter conversation about archaeological data and publishing. The chat, as they often do on Twitter, became quite wide ranging, straying into the such charged areas as sandwich making and piano playing, but one of the more salient and thought-provoking points was that the end result of archaeological work should be proper publication. The following post is an effort to connect that conversation and view of archaeology to a paper that I’m slowly preparing for EAAs on a similar topic

    On the surface, it’s hard to disagree with this. For most of my career in the field, projects that publish promptly receive the highest praise and archaeologists who do not earn (often quiet )derision. The pressure and expectation to publish is such that I’ve tended to see the entire archaeological enterprise – from planning field seasons to methods and procedures and the organization of labor and resources – as leading toward the final publication. If anything, I’ve probably tended to privilege excavation over all other outcomes of archaeological work to a fault. This reflects the standard belief that archaeological work – whether excavation or survey – is destructive and only restored through the proper publication of methods and results. While I’m never so naive as to believe that publication allows for the reconstruction of excavated level and layers, I will admit to imagining that greater transparency and rigor in documenting the excavation or survey process – both in terms of process and methods – will provide the foundations for more open-ended and nuanced interpretation.    

    Most archaeologists are familiar with the general rhetoric that since archaeology is “destructive,” our work should take great pains to extract as much data as possible from the field. This “data” then becomes the foundations for analysis and interpretation and ultimately publication.

    Of course, we also recognize that this rhetoric is, in a sense, facile. It’s a nice way to encourage students and volunteers to be careful in the trench or survey unit and perhaps even serves as a cautionary reminder that more, larger, deeper, trenches do indeed produce more, larger, deeper problems (i.e. mo’ trenches, mo’ problems). Archaeology is not a non-renewable resource, any more than excavation is an extractive industry. Archaeology is generative and productive and gives meaning to the flotsam of the past.

    The focus on field work projects and the discipline on publication (and the logic that dictates this) serves to reinforce the social organization of archaeological practice in key ways. Final publication typically remains the responsibility of the director or directors, for example. As a result, the organization of archaeological work tends to be hierarchical with the director or directors at the top of a pyramid and specialists, supervisors, and workers forming the foundations for the ultimate expression of synthetic knowledge. In this idealized, if still representative structure, the copious “data” collected in the field by workers, organized and refined by specialists and supervisors, and then presented in reports becomes the possession of the director and foundational to analysis and interpretation. The recent and generally salutary trend toward the publication of “raw data” allows for readers to “drill down” through published analysis toward more granular bit of archaeological knowledge, closer to the trowel’s edge, and less complicated by — or at least disaggregated from — subsequent interpretation and analysis. In this way, archaeological work parallels the logic of excavation and the assembly line. Raw data enters the archaeological workflow at the trowel’s edge and refined interpretation exits in the final publication. 

    The model that I have sketched out is both representative of certain currents in archaeological thought and mostly not true. We know that projects rarely work in such a streamlined way. Specialists harvest data and produce publications from archaeological artifacts. Volunteers and supervisors gain experience working on archaeological projects and this experience has direct value to their careers. Most projects have programs engaging local and global communities and recognize their responsibilities to conserve and present their work on site. In many cases, these the value generated from these outcomes trumps the value of a tidy and professional final publication. Moreover, in a few case, such as salvage projects, the final publication of archaeological analysis is not even a planned outcome; archaeological excavation is simply the performance of privilege or responsibility limited to particular groups within a community. In these cases it may be that careful excavation or survey is an expression of value in and of itself. 

    In this context, then, the value of archaeological work is not limited to final publication and subject to the pressures of Taylorist efficiency, but distributed through a complex system. Workflow in this case, is not about the linearity of the assembly line but the value producing networks of logistics (especially as studied and articulated by folks like Deborah Cowen). 

    Of course, articulating archaeological work through the lens of logistics is not without its own set of challenges. If the metaphor of industrial production and the assembly line promotes hierarchy, then the distributed authority and value present in a logistics network distributes agency between individuals, objects, communities, and methods. The methods of drilling down from the final product to the more “raw” initial observation dissipates across a network where the authority of identification, analysis, and interpretation relies less on a linear relationship between empirical observation and final publication, and more on the shifting relationships between individuals, objects, and technics. The ease with which these relationships can be reconfigured to produce unexpected outcomes – some of which might be undesirable on ethical grounds – marks out how an “uberfied” archaeology values expertise less and access more. The flow of data and knowledge in these logistic network involves the constant dividing and realigning of things and the sharing of responsibilities (but also the competition across the entire network for the right to expertise and the knowledge making).  

     


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    [First posted in AWOL 24 February 2009. Updated 14 August 2018]

    Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions

    Pottery is a critical tool in our understanding of the society, art, and language of ancient Greece. Most vase painters who worked in Attica—the area of Greece surrounding Athens—were active during the sixth to fourth centuries BC. Their work was often inscribed either directly into the clay or by painting the surface. Henry Immerwahr's Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions is an attempt to catalog these inscribed vases. It contains 8,173 entries and is the result of more than sixty years of research. Each entry is given a local identifier and indicates which collection the vase belongs to (and the inventory number where possible). The entries then have four parts:
    • Section A documents the type of vase, place of discovery if known, painter or potter or both, date, and bibliography;
    • Section B contains a short description of the paintings;
    • Section C contains the inscriptions; and
    • Section D offers free commentary.
    A significant number of the entries contain additional footnotes. No illustrations are provided. To learn more about the history of the corpus, read Immerwahr’s description of it. The material gathered in the corpus is the basis for an on-going project by Rudolf Wachter.

    About the Author

    Heinrich Rudolf (later Henry Rudolph) Leopold Immerwahr was born on February 28, 1916, in Breslau, Germany (now Wrocław, Poland). He earned a Dottore in Lettere at the University of Florence in 1938 and in the next year began a fellowship at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, where he met his future wife, Sara Anderson. The onset of war made Greece unsafe for foreign students, especially those of Jewish heritage. Henry was able to continue his fellowship at Yale, although travel to the U.S. in wartime was dogged with delays and setbacks. Though not an American citizen, Henry registered for the draft two days after his arrival in New York City. He spent two years both as a student at Yale and as (technically) an enemy alien in the U.S. His draft notice arrived in 1943 as he was in the throes of completing his graduate work. The bureaucratic move of transferring his registration site to Hartford, CT, gave him the extra month he needed to finish his dissertation and obtain his Ph.D. in Classics from Yale. He became a U.S. citizen at the same time and served his new country for two years, finding time to get married in the midst of a world war. After the war and a year spent studying at Harvard, Henry returned as an instructor to Yale, where his only child, Mary Elizabeth, was born. In 1957, he joined the Department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He rose to full professor in 1963 and to Alumni Distinguished Professor of Greek in 1975. Sara Immerwahr also taught at UNC, first part-time in UNC's Department of Classics and later in the Art Department, becoming a full professor in 1971. In 1977, Henry retired from UNC and became director of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens for a five-year term. In retirement, he continued to work on the Corpus of Attic Vase Inscriptions and other pursuits.


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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by New Jersey State Museum/Archaeology & Ethnography Bureau
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018

    Celebrate International Archaeology Day on October 20, 2018

    At the New Jersey State Museum

    10:00 am–4:00 pm

    Location

    Name: 
    Karen Flinn, Assistant Curator, Archaeology/Ethnography Bureau
    Telephone: 
    609-341-5063
    Call for Papers: 
    no

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    Silchester Iron Age and Roman Town

    Exploring the Iron Age and Roman site and wider landscape of Calleva Atrebatum
    An archaeologist digging at the Silchester site 

    About Silchester

    Find out about the history of the Silchester site and the excavations of the Iron Age and Roman town of Calleva Atrebatum.
    silch-iOS-Simulator-Screen-thumb

    Silchester iPhone App

    Enjoy a trip to Silchester Roman Town. Find out about Silchester iPhone App
    Working at Silchester

    Silchester Archaeology Projects

    Find out about the excavations at the site from the Victorian era to the present day Nero and Environs projects
    An archaeologist at work on an artefact - University of Reading

    Study archaeology

    Find out about the courses on offered by the Department of Archaeology at Reading.
    A watercolour image of the Silchester Eagle

    Discoveries

    See some of the exciting artefacts that have been discovered at Silchester.
    BBC Bershire on site

    Silchester and the media

    Get details of media coverage about Silchester and find out how to contact the press team.



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    In this podcast I look at the oddity that was ostracism in Ancient Athens. Why was it needed? What did it aim to do? There’s also a brief chat about tyrants and which includes an instance which Herodotus calls the silliest trick in history.

    Feel free to find me on twitter (@ancientblogger)

    Music by Brakhage (Le Vrai Instrumental)


    Check out this episode!


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    Greece Artemis templeEVIA, GREECE—A team of researchers led by Karl Reber of the Swiss Archaeological School in Greece and Amalia Karappaschalidou of the Evia Ephorate of Antiquities has uncovered a variety of artifacts at the sanctuary of Artemis near Amarynthos, according to The Greek Reporter. The site, discovered last year, was the end point of an annual procession from the ancient city of Eretria. The items include embossed tiles bearing the name “Artemis”; statue bases inscribed with dedications to Artemis, her brother Apollo, and their mother, Leto; and a copper and quartz object that may have been part of a larger statue. Scholars suggest the temple, which is thought to have been destroyed by a natural disaster in the first century B.C., and rebuilt in the second century A.D., helped to strengthen Eretria’s border. The excavation team also found evidence of earlier buildings at the site, dating back to the tenth century B.C. To read in-depth about study of the temple of Hera at the site of Olympia, go to “A New View of the Birthplace of the Olympics.”


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    Turkey Çatalhöyük climateBRISTOL, ENGLAND—Science Magazine reports that biochemists Mélanie Roffet-Salque and Richard Evershed of the University of Bristol and their colleagues analyzed the residues on pottery from the site of Çatalhöyük, which is located in central Turkey, for clues to how a shift in the climate some 8,200 years ago might have affected early farmers. The scientists speculated that drought could have damaged crops and grazing lands, while cooler weather could have increased the food needs of the farmers’ sheep, goats, and cattle. A technique called gas chromatography—mass spectrometry revealed that the fat residues on the pottery dating to the time of the climate shift contained about nine percent more heavy hydrogen—an isotope that correlates with lower levels of precipitation—than sherds from other periods. The researchers also note the higher number of cut marks on animal bones beginning about 8,200 years ago, suggesting that the farmers ate every morsel of available food, and a drop in the number of cattle bones and a rise in the number of goat bones. Goats may have been better at surviving in drought conditions. To read about a figurine discovered at Çatalhöyük, go to “Figure of Distinction.”


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    Texts Added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) on August 10, 2018

    Updated on: 2018-08-10
    2710 LEO BARDALAS Epigr.
    2718 Manuel PHILES Scr. Eccl., Scr. Rerum Nat. et Poeta
    3089 Nicephorus CHRYSOBERGES Orat. et Rhet.
    3200 Manuel II PALAEOLOGUS Imperator Theol. et Rhet.
    3205 THEODORUS II DUCAS LASCARIS Theol. et Rhet.
    3236 Nicephorus Callistus XANTHOPULUS Hist. et Theol.
    3315 ANONYMA PALAEOLOGICA Encom.
    3384 PHOTIUS DIACONUS Theol.
    3385 LEONTIUS Monachus Hagiogr.
    3386 MICHAEL Monachus Theol.
    4031 EUSTRATIUS Phil.
    4090 CYRILLUS Alexandrinus Theol.
    4201 Joannes CHORTASMENUS Philol. et Rhet.
    4445 Georgius SCYLITZES Poeta
    4466 Georgius LAPITHES Theol.
    4470 LEO MEGISTUS Rhet.
    4471 THEODORUS II IRENICUS PATRIARCHA Phil.
    4472 Philippus MONOTROPUS Theol.
    5150 VITAE SANCTI SPYRIDONIS Hagiogr.
    5152 MIRACULA SANCTI MENAE Hagiogr.
    5153 VITAE SANCTORUM GALACTIONIS ET EPISTEMES Hagiogr.
    5323 ACTA MONASTERII SANCTI IOANNIS PRODROMI IN PETRA Eccl., Acta et Legal.
    5510 CARMINA ANONYMA E CODICE VATICANO GR. 743 Phil.
    9009 Michael APOSTOLIUS Paroemiogr.
    9056 ARSENIUS AUTORIANUS Acta et Eccl.
    9058 Meletius PEGAS Patriarcha Hagiogr.
    9059 Georgius CHRYSOGONUS Phil. et Theol.

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     [First posted in AWOL 4 January 2016, updated 14 August 2018]

    Arabian Epigraphic Notes: An Open Access Online Journal on Arabian Epigraphy
    ISSN: 2451-8875
    The Arabian Peninsula contains one of the richest epigraphic landscapes in the Old World, and new texts are being discovered with every expedition to its deserts and oases. Arabian Epigraphic Notes is a forum for the publication of these epigraphic finds, and for the discussion of relevant historical and linguistic issues. The Arabian Peninsula is broadly defined as including the landmass between the Red Sea and the Arabo-Persian gulf, and stretching northward into the Syrian Desert, Jordan, and adjacent cultural areas. In order to keep up with the rapid pace of discoveries, our online format will provide authors the ability to publish immediately following peer-review, and will make available for download high resolution, color photographs. The open-access format will ensure as wide a readership as possible.
    AEN invites original articles and short communications dealing with the Ancient South Arabian, Ancient North Arabian, Nabataean (and Aramaic in general), Arabic, and Greek epigraphy from the Arabian Peninsula, but also from other areas so long as the link to Arabia and its cultures is clear. The language of the Journal is English. Review articles will also be considered.
    Arabian Epigraphic Notes is essential reading for all interested in the languages and scripts of the ancient Near East, and of interest to students of Northwest Semitic epigraphy, Cuneiform studies, Egyptology, and classical antiquity. We hope that the journal will contribute to our understanding of the languages and cultures of Arabia, from their earliest attestations until the contemporary period. It is hoped that the journal’s accessibility will further help integrate the epigraphy and languages of ancient Arabia into the broader field of Semitic Philology.

    Volumes




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    Can't STOP the bulldozing of our PASt?
    ... and here is something  from the impotent 'might-as-well-shrug-our-shoulders' supporters of the present status quo over the conservation of the archaeological record in the face of the damage being done to it by its Collection-Driven Exploitation: Raimund Karl (Prifysgol Bangor University) 'Bulldozing and the lack of efficacy of any kind of regulationA response to a paper by Samuel A. Hardy'. Here is the abstract:
    In a recent study, Samuel A. Hardy (2017) has attempted a wide-ranging comparison of the efficacy of different kinds of regulating mechanical earthmoving operations in archaeological landscapes. Based on a comparison of 12 countries with partially different regulatory regimes, some more liberal, others more restrictive, he arrives at the tentative conclusion that liberal regulatory approaches are less effective than restrictive ones in reducing damage to archaeological evidence by bulldozing. According to the results of his study, the regulatory systems in England and Wales, and the USA, work particularly badly in preventing archaeological damage due to earthmoving operations. In this paper, I demonstrate that his study is seriously methodically flawed, and thus cannot be considered to be the empirical study it pretends to be. As I show, while Hardy uses a reasonably consistent methodology to estimate the scale of commercial earthmoving in 10 of the countries he examines, by slightly deflating the membership figures of the respectively largest online commercial earthmoving discussion board or Facebook group in each of them, he deviates massively from this for England and Wales, and the USA. Where these two countries are concerned, while having comparable data of the same quality as for all others, he estimates the size of the respective commercial earthmoving communities based on the vastly inflated numbers of the largest metal detecting association in one, and a miscalculation based on uncorroborated sales figures for metal detectors, second hand information gathered from an online journal article, in the other. I thus argue that Hardy’s (2017) study, its results, and the conclusions he draws from them, sadly must be discarded. Rather, I argue that his data, if not manipulated, shows (sic) that neither more liberal nor more restrictive regulation of bulldozing is more efficient than the other in reducing archaeological damage.
    Keywords: Keywords: bulldozing, regulation, archaeology, transnational comparison, empirical research
    I admit I have altered the title and content of the abstract a little (original here) to illustrate how specious the overall argument is. I think we should all be not a little disturbed by the number of archaeologists adopting this line of argument precisely now. What they are saying is that if restrictive laws do not stop people from destroying sites with metal detectors, spades and bulldozers, we might as well scrap the restrictive laws that exist so when these sites are disturbed by metal detectorists, and bulldozer drivers, we at least see some of the artefacts these people 'uncover' by their destructive activity. What nonsense. We should not rely on the law - since some metal detector users (and some mechanical earthmoving equipment drivers) but on increasing public awareness and public disapproval.

    It's social pressure and attitudes that will bring an end to the current shoulder-shrugging laissez fairism. Like it has dog poo on the streets. Not in England though, it seems to me when I go back there on a visit from Europe, many towns still stinks of dog shit on a hot summer day. It should be against the law... 

    Karl reckons that Hardy's figure of 27000 detectorists in England and Wales 'sadly must be discarded' in favour (he says on p. 19) of the
    [...] figure of 14,834 established further above as the minimum number of presumably active metal detectorists in England and Wales, and assuming all of them to actually, at least mostly, make ‘licit’ finds, this would immediately bring down Hardy’s estimate of the number of ‘licit’ ‘reportable’ finds made per annum in England and Wales to ‘only’ c. 1,315,274. 
    (note the scare quotes). Ah... but then only 80000 of those are recorded on the PAS database in an average year... oh dear, so still the PAS is not doing all that well (BTW these are figures well above that of the HA arteafct erosion counter). So Karl still has to play with the figures. Look at this (from someone who's just accused Hardy of manipulating his numbers):
    Also, Hardy forgot to consider in his ‘calculations’ that the PAS does not record all finds reported to it (Lewis 2016, 131). Rather, the number of finds actually recorded by the PAS may reflect, on average, as little as c. 1 in 10 of all finds reported to its FLOs (pers. comm. P. Reavill, PAS FLO). Thus, the number of recorded finds might actually represent c. 837,950 finds reported annually to the PAS. Comparing these ‘estimates’, as many as c. 63.71% of all ‘reportable’ finds found annually by metal detectorists during ‘licit’ searches in England and Wales might actually be reported by them to the PAS. This would at least be considerably better than the c. 4% Hardy argues for, even if it probably is an ‘overestimate’.
    What is missing here?
      FLO Catchment area map, Peter  Reavill
    You say it could be almost 64%, Dr Karl? So, I guess we are supposed to assume everything is OK, it's not the ("partner") metal detectorists that are the problem, but just the inability to cope with the FLOODS of artefacts coming in. The point is, even if Karl was right (and I am sure he is not) these objects are still being pocketed by artefact hunters without even the most rudimentary information getting into the public domain -s we are all the losers from the selfishly-exploitative hobby that raimund Karl seems insistent on defending. I'd also like to know what all Mr Reavil's 'partnering' metal detectorists think of all this, week after week they take the trouble to put their artefacts in little polybags, write out the labels and the so-and-so in Ludlow cherrypicks the best ten percent and gives the rest back unrecorded. So the 5,313 records he's spent the last few years making represent some 48000 artefacts lost without record on his patch alone? If that is true, that is abysmal, Mr Reavill.

    And in Bangor, 64% of the dog poo is not lying in the middle of the pavements, which makes Dr Karl really happy. 36% still is though, 4% has been bagged ip and taken right away, and the other 60% has been swept behind the bushes where nobody can see it. That'sapparently what the Bangor professsor sees as a great success and does not require any kind of social campaign to change things, and anyone who says it is not will get the same treatment as Dr Hardy.







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    New Mexico macawsSTATE COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANIA—According to a Smithsonian Magazine report, a new study of scarlet macaw bones unearthed in New Mexico suggests the birds were bred in captivity and raised with a great deal of specialized care and effort at a single, small aviary in what is now the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico by ancestral Pueblo peoples between A.D. 850 and 1150. Richard George of Penn State University and his team extracted mitochondrial DNA from the remains of 14 macaws recovered from five different sites in Chaco Canyon and the Mimbres region of New Mexico. They found that all 14 birds shared a similar heritage, and more than 70 percent of them likely shared a maternal lineage. “This is important… not only the population history of macaws and human interaction, but also what was happening between groups of people,” George explained. Images of macaw chicks on Mimbres pottery also support the idea that the fast-growing birds were raised locally. It had been previously suggested that macaws in North America had been imported from the Paquimé aviary in Mexico, which was most active between A.D. 1250 and 1450. Such a long journey from Mexico to Chaco Canyon would have taken more than a month. For more on evidence of macaws in the American Southwest, go to “Angry Birds.”