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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Office of the State Archaeologist, the Iowa Society AIA, Linn County, Iowa, County Conservation and Wickiup Hills Learning Center
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 1:00pm

    Come out to Wickiup Hills Learning Center, one of Linn counties parks for an opportunity to try your hand at throwing 5’ and 6’ darts using an atlatl, or spear thrower.  All ages are welcome and all equipment will be provided for a fun afternoon throwing darts at pumpkins!  There will also be an assortment of other targets including 3D deer and turkeys, an official accuracy target, and even a life-sized Wizard of Oz Flying Monkey!  If possible there will also be flint knappers at work during this event.

    AIA Society: 

    Location

    Name: 
    Mark L Anderson
    Telephone: 
    3193840998
    Call for Papers: 
    no

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    [First posted in AWOL 25 October 2009. Updated 17 September 2018]

    British Institute for the Study of Iraq Newsletter

    BISI currently produces an annual newsletter, presenting the highlights of the year and reports on funded research and outreach projects. Below you can read PDFs of BISI Newsletters from 2003 to the present.


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        Na een succesvolle eerste editie komen de Archeologiedagen volgend jaar terug. De Archeologiedagen 2019 zullen plaatsvinden op 14, 15 en 16 juni. Tijdens de archeologiedagen maakt het publiek kennis met alle facetten van de archeologie: van opgraving tot museum, van neanderthaler tot WOI-soldaat, van speerpunten tot Romeinse munten, … Wil je zelf een activiteit organiseren? Schrijf alvast 27 november 2018 in je agenda, want dan vindt het inspiratiemoment plaats.


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        A few basic resources for Agamemnon.

        For the text in Greek with two English translations, one by Robert Browning, see the Agamemnon on the Perseus site, where the Greek text is hyperlinked to four dictionaries. The other translation there, by Herbert Weir Smyth, is the one used in the Loeb edition of the play. That dual language Loeb edition can be found online in a pdf format here.

        Clytemnestra killed by Orestes

        Below is a comparison of lines 8-20 - these are difficult, highly figurative lines, a challenge for any reader:

        Here's Browning's version:

        And now on ward I wait the torch's token,
        The glow of fire, shall bring from Troia message
        And word of capture: so prevails audacious
        The man's-way-planning hoping heart of woman.
        But when I, driven from night-rest, dew-drenched hold to
        This couch of mine -- not looked upon by visions,
        Since fear instead of sleep still stands beside me,
        So as that fast I fix in sleep no eyelids --
        And when to sing or chirp a tune I fancy,
        For slumber such song-remedy infusing,
        I wail then, for this House's fortune groaning,
        Not, as of old, after the best ways governed.
        Now, lucky be deliverance from these labours,
        At good news -- the appearing dusky fire!

        Here's Smyth's prose:

        So now I am still watching for the signal-flame, the gleaming fire that is to bring news from Troy and [10] tidings of its capture. For thus commands my queen, woman in passionate heart and man in strength of purpose. And whenever I make here my bed, restless and dank with dew and unvisited by dreams—for instead of sleep fear stands ever by my side, [15] so that I cannot close my eyelids fast in sleep—and whenever I care to sing or hum (and thus apply an antidote of song to ward off drowsiness), then my tears start forth, as I bewail the fortunes of this house of ours, not ordered for the best as in days gone by. [20] But tonight may there come a happy release from my weary task! May the fire with its glad tidings flash through the gloom!

        For some basic orientation and sensible reading, perhaps a good place to begin would be H.D.F. Kitto's two books: Greek Tragedy, and Form and Meaning in Drama: A Study of Six Greek Plays and of Hamlet.



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        The Eastern Desert of Egypt during the Greco-Roman Period: Archaeological Reports

        The Eastern Desert of Egypt during the Greco-Roman Period: Archaeological Reports
        Extrait
        The Eastern Desert of Egypt extends over a vast area of mountains and sandy plains between the Nile and the Red Sea. Its natural riches –gold, gems and high quality stones (such as granite from Mons Claudianus, Tiberianè or Ophiatès, porphyry from Porphyritès, basanites [greywacke] from the Wâdi al-Hammâmât, etc.)– have, despite the difficulties due to harsh climatic conditions, been exploited since the Predynastic period. The Pharaohs, the Ptolemies and the Roman emperors often sent exped...

        Lire la suite

        Note de l’éditeur

        This book comes from a colloquium held at the Collège de France in Paris on March 30th and 31st, 2016.
        Its objective was to take stock of the archaeological work of the last forty years by bringing together all the invited field actors to present a synthesis of their research on the occupation and exploitation of the Ptolemaic desert at the end of theByzantine period.
        Caption cover image: The Roman fort of Dios, 2nd-3rd century AD
        © J.-P. Brun

        • Éditeur : Collège de France
        • Collection : Institut des civilisations
        • Lieu d’édition : Paris
        • Année d’édition : 2018
        • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 14 septembre 2018
        • ISBN électronique : 9782722604889
        • DOI : 10.4000/books.cdf.5230
        Jean-Pierre Brun, Thomas Faucher, Bérangère Redon et al.
        Introduction
        Adam Bülow-Jacobsen
        Quarries with Subtitles
        Marijke Van der Veen, Charlène Bouchaud, René Cappers et al.
        Roman Life in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Food, Imperial Power and Geopolitics
        Charlène Bouchaud, Claire Newton, Marijke Van der Veen et al.
        Fuelwood and Wood Supplies in the Eastern Desert of Egypt during Roman Times
        Felicity Wild et John Peter Wild
        Textile Contrasts at Berenike

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        Egypt Aswan sphinxASWAN, EGYPT—BBC News reports that a sandstone sphinx measuring about 15 inches tall was discovered during work to reduce groundwater levels at the pharaonic temple of Kom Ombo, which was constructed by Ptolemy VI in honor of the twin gods Sobek and Haroeris. According to Egypt's antiquities ministry, the statue was found in the same area of the temple where two sandstone reliefs of King Ptolemy V were previously unearthed. The sphinx is thought to date to the Ptolemaic era, between 305 and 30 B.C. For more on the Ptolemaic era in Egypt, go to “In the Time of the Rosetta Stone.”


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        Denmark gold treasureHJARNØ, DENMARK—The Copenhagen Post reports that a metal detectorist discovered a collection of gold and pearl artifacts on a small island off the east coast of Jutland. Dated to about A.D. 500, the jewelry may have been hidden from the Romans, according to Mads Ravn of the Vejle Museum. “They’ve probably been down there on a mission to plunder, so our little find is a reminder of a turbulent period in world history when gold spoke its own, very clear language,” he said. A volcanic eruption in El Salvador and the resulting ash cloud and climate change could have also prompted the burial of the treasure as an offering to the gods, Ravn added. For more on arcaheology in Denmark, go to “Bluetooth's Fortress.”


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        Pembroke Castle mansionPEMBROKE, WALES—According to a report in The Guardian, archaeologists digging test trenches on the grounds of Pembroke Castle have uncovered stone structures that could be the remains of a mansion where Henry VII was born in 1457. Other finds indicate the building had a slate roof adorned with green-glazed ridge tiles, and a spiral staircase. It had been thought the king was born in castle’s thirteenth-century tower, but this building’s outline was spotted in the parched grass of the castle grounds from the air. “We know [from documentary evidence] that he was born in the castle, which was at that time owned by his uncle, Jasper Tudor,” said archaeologist James Meek. “It’s more likely that he was born in a modern residence, for the time, than in a guard tower on the walls.” A newly discovered cesspit could also offer information about royal medieval life. Henry VII ascended to the throne of England after he defeated Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, ending the Wars of the Roses. To read about the discovery of the burial place of Richard III, go to “Richard III’s Last Act.”


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        Archaeologists believe they have identified the exact site of Henry VII’s birth in 1457 after...

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        Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a statue of a sphinx while draining water from the pharaonic...

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        [First posted in AWOL 7 April 2012. Updated 17 September 2018]

        The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
        ISSN 1872-5082
        Online ISSN: 1872-5473

        image of Issue 1
        From 2012 this is a full Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content, in exchange for an article processing fee. For more information, see our Open Access Policy page. 
        This journal is published under the auspices of the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies. The international editorial board is headed by Professor John Finamore of the University of Iowa. This exciting journal covers all facets of the Platonic tradition (from Thales through Thomas Taylor, and beyond) from all perspectives (including philosophical, historical, religious, etc.) and all corners of the world (Pagan, Christian, Jewish, Islamic, etc.).
        The journal is published in 2 issues per year.
        Open Access icon

        Volumes & issues:


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        The 3rd SEAMEO SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology will be held next year from 17-19 June 2019 (with optional site visits and workshops on 20-21). Right now we are accepting proposals for sessions and also starting up a mailing list for conference announcements.

        The post SPAFACON2019 Call for Sessions appeared first on SEAArch - Southeast Asian Archaeology.


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        ornamenta triumphalia (n. pl.)

        The dress and trappings worn at a triumph, often awarded in lieu of a triumph itself under the Principate. Tac., Ag. 40.1; Suet., Tib. 9.2; CIL III, 2830; VI, 1444. [Maxfield 1981]


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      • 09/17/18--23:13: The winners of our grant
      • We are delighted to announce the winners of our grant for Epigraphic Educational and Training Courses and Workshops.


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        paenula (f. pl. paenulae)

        A woollen cape with a central opening which fastened down the front with buttons or toggles, resembling a poncho. The sides were often rolled or folded onto the shoulders to leave the arms free. It was most popular amongst soldiers in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. Suet., Galb. 6.2; Sen., De Ben. 5.24.2; Tab. Vind. 196. [Sumner 2009]


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        paludamentum (n. pl. paludamenta)

        A type of cloak worn by officers, fastened on the right shoulder, then draped around the neck and over the left arm. According to Pliny, it was dyed red (using the Kermes scale insect). Livy 25.16.21; Pliny, NH 22.3. [Sumner 2009]


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        October 05, 2018 - 9:21 AM - LECTURE dr. Jan Zacharias (Janric) van Rookhuijzen (Leiden University)

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        Review of John V. Garner, The Emerging Good in Plato's Philebus. Rereading Ancient Philosophy. Evanston, IL: 2017. Pp. xii, 180. $34.95 (pb). ISBN 9780810135604.

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        Review of S. Douglas Olson, Eupolis, Einleitung, Testimonia und Aiges–Demoi (Frr. 1–146). Fragmenta Comica 8.1. Heidelberg: 2017. Pp. 525. $113.00. ISBN 9783946317111.

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        <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/7lV7AE8skz0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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        <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/2Wjq6dUZzeo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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        I have asked before whether Jesus had the kinds of cross-cultural experiences that typically enable people to see beyond the culture and values they were brought up in, becoming aware of what to others is like the air we breathe – invisible and unnoticed most of the time. As the headline of one recent article […]

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      • 09/18/18--02:19: On the Mesha Stele
      • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/GTtnLzwFJzk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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      • 09/18/18--02:34: Yom Kippur 2018
      • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/5mN3xlJhtjs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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        [First posted in AWOL 17 July 21917, updated 18 September 2018]

        Iliria

        thumbnail
        Iliria est une revue scientifique, publication de l’Institut Archéologique d’Albanie, dont le premier numéro est paru en 1971. Elle est publiée à un rythme annuel au cours de sa première décennie, puis devient périodique à partir de 1981.

        Elle publie des études et matériaux archéologiques des auteurs albanais et étrangers, qui travaillent sur le territoire de l’Albanie actuelle dans les domaines de la préhistoire, de l’antiquité et du bas moyen âge, ainsi que des études historiques se rapportant à ces domaines. L’objet principal de ces études a été les problèmes fondamentaux de l’archéologie albanaise, tels que l’ethnogenèse des Illyriens, la naissance et le développement de l’État illyrien et la formation du peuple albanais et de sa civilisation. Les articles sont accompagnés d’un résumé en français ou en anglais et, dans des cas particuliers, sont traduits intégralement.

        La collection complète de la revue Iliria compte jusqu’à présent 46 volumes, qui embrassent plus de 15000 pages de la recherche scientifique archéologique albanaise.

        Les changements démocratiques qui ont eu lieu en Albanie au début des années 90 ont conduit à la liberté académique dans les écrits et à l’ouverture avec le monde étranger.

        1971-1979

        1980-1989

        1990-1999

        2000-2009

        2010-...


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        Titre: Entre Pline, Tacite et Pétrone : l'inspiration romaine pour un roman aujourd'hui
        Lieu: Lycée Henri-IV / Paris
        Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
        Date: 10.10.2018
        Heure: 18.30 h
        Description:

        Information signalée par Cécilia Suzzoni

        Conférence du romancier Hédi Kaddour

        Entre Pline, Tacite et Pétrone : l'inspiration romaine pour un roman aujourd'hui

         

        Conférence de Hédi Kaddour, ancien professeur de littérature française et de dramaturgie à l'ENS de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud, puis Lyon :
        "Entre Pline, Tacite et Pétrone : l'inspiration romaine pour un roman aujourd'hui"
        Mercredi 10 octobre 2018, 18h30
        Lycée Henri IV, salle de conférences
        Entrée libre , sur inscription pour les personnes extérieures au lycée à
        contacter.alle[at]gmail.com

        Lieu de la manifestation : Lycée Henri IV, Paris 75005
        Organisation : Association ALLE
        Contact : congacter.alle[at]gmail.com


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      • 09/18/18--04:20: Sonus in Metaphora
      • Titre: Sonus in Metaphora
        Lieu: Université de Franche-Comté / Besançon
        Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
        Date: 25.10.2018 - 26.10.2018
        Heure: 14.00 h - 16.00 h
        Description:

        Information signalée par Francesco Buè

        Sonus in Metaphora

        Colloque international autour de la rhétorique sonore et musicale dans l'Antiquité

        jeudi 25 et vendredi 26 octobre 2018


        Projet scientifique et organisation : Francesco Buè (Université Catholique de Louvain), Angelo Vannini (ISTA)
        Comité scientifique : Francesco Buè (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgique), Roberto M. Danese (Université d'Urbino Carlo Bo, Italie), João Diogo Loureiro (Université de Coimbra, Portugal), Arnaud Macé (Université de Franche-Comté).

        Description du projet :
        Dans le cadre des études historico-littéraires et philosophiques de l'Antiquité, le sujet de la rhétorique liée au monde sonore offre de nos jours la possibilité de tracer de nouveaux et fructueux axes de recherche. En effet, l'étude de la rhétorique sonore permet non seulement de mieux comprendre les textes des auteurs antiques, mais encore d'explorer l'horizon sonore de leurs civilisations - dont on ne connaît que partiellement les réelles expressions sonores.
        On entendra par rhétorique sonore et musicale l'ensemble des figures de style qui, depuis l'intérieur du tissu rhétorique antique, ont permis de conserver l'aperçu des sons entendus et imaginés autrefois. Cet ensemble de figures de style peut contribuer à enrichir remarquablement la connaissance des critères esthétiques qui servaient à apprécier les sons et, implicitement, à aborder une partie importante du quotidien de l'Homme antique. L'enjeu et le défi sont de retrouver les éléments essentiels de l'imaginaire sonore partagé par l'auteur et son public. A cet effet, la littérature et la philosophie constituent des témoins précieux pour reconstruire la phonosphère propre au texte et à son époque.
        Le colloque international « Sonus in metaphora » se veut un moment de réflexion et d'échange autour d'un sujet aussi intéressant que fertile, celui de l'imaginaire sonore cristallisé dans le langage figuratif. Ce dernier offre au spécialiste de l'Antiquité l'occasion de prêter son “oreille mentale” aux sons qui se cachent au niveau lexical, rhétorique, historique et philosophique, derrière le filtre de l'élaboration textuelle. Ce colloque permettra à une quinzaine d'intervenants de décliner l'étude de la rhétorique sonore et musicale antique à plusieurs niveaux et selon différents points de vue. Ainsi sera traité le thème « Sonus in metaphora » dans la poésie grecque (de la lyrique archaïque à l'épigramme hellénistique), dans la poésie et la narrative latines, dans la philosophie de Platon et d'Aristote, dans la prose philosophique de Cicéron à Apulée.
        L'événement est soutenu et accueilli par l'Institut des Sciences et Techniques de l'Antiquité (ISTA) de l'Université de Franche-Comté, et a pour but d'accroître la connaissance de la phonosphère antique à travers la réflexion de chercheurs provenant d'universités françaises et étrangères, spécialistes de différents domaines de l'Antiquité. L'étude des sons présents dans le tissu rhétorique antique s'annonce fructueuse et diversifiée, dans une perspective de connaissance du passé axée à la fois sur les méthodes de recherche classiques et sur la multidisciplinarité. L'objectif étant que ces tentatives de compréhension philologique, historiographique et philosophique puissent faire émerger les « sons inouïs » de l'Antiquité, dans le contexte historique et culturel contemporain, où l'on continue de redécouvrir le son comme moyen de connaissance, d'art et de réflexion.


        Colloque international « Sonus in Metaphora »



        Jeudi 25 octobre

        14h 00 Accueil des participants

        14h 20 Présentations de la journée et ouverture des travaux
        - Antonio Gonzales, directeur de l'ISTA

        Littérature grecque
        Séance présidée par Michel Fartzoff

        14h 40 Anne Caroline Rendu-Loisel (Université de Strasbourg)
        L'imaginaire sonore dans les textes de la littérature suméro-akkadienne

        15h 20 Francesco Buè (Université Catholique de Louvain)
        Archery, birds and sounds in a metaphorical passage. Study on Pind. O. II, 83-90

        16h 00 Maria Paola Pezzotti (Université Catholique de Milan)
        ζῆν μετὰ μουσίας – some case-studies from Hellenistic epigrams


        Pause (de 16h 40 à 17h 00)

        Philosophie grecque
        Séance présidée par Arnaud Macé

        17h 00 Tosca Lynch (Université d'Oxford)
        Musical “metaphors” in Plato? Justice and the model of the lyre

        17h 40 Ana Kotarcic (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
        Between sound and mind: Aristotle on stylistic figures

        18h 20 Lora Mariat (Université de Franche-Comté)
        Ethique et théorie musicale chez Plutarque (à propos des traités De l'écoute et De la Musique)

        Dîner du colloque



        Vendredi 26 octobre

        9h 10 Accueil des participants

        Littérature latine
        Séance présidée par Benjamin Goldlust

        9h 30 Roberto M. Danese (Université d'Urbino Carlo Bo)
        Plautus sonum dedit

        10h 10 Manuel Galzerano (Université de Rome 3)
        « Succidere horrisono posse omnia victa fragore »: Lucretius and the sound of the end of the world

        Pause (de 10h 50 à 11h 10)

        11h 10 Benedetta Sciaramenti (Université de Pérouse)
        « non vox erat, et tamen »... Métaphore et métamorphose entre Écho et Narcisse

        11h 50 Luca Graverini (Université de Sienne)
        Music, Song, and the Poetics of Latin Narrative

        Déjeuner à 12h 30

        Philosophie et anthropologie latine
        Séance présidée par Roberto M. Danese

        14h 00 Thomas Guard (Université de Franche-Comté - ISTA)
        sur Cicéron, titre à préciser

        14h 40 Angelo Vannini (ISTA)
        Écouter – la conscience. Considérations acoustiques sur la philosophie d'Apulée

        15h 20 João Diogo Loureiro (Université de Coimbra)
        Listening to the voice of reason: sound-related metaphors for the philosophical experience in Aristotle and Augustine


        Conférence de clôture
        Introduite par Angelo Vannini

        16h 00 Sacha Carlson (Université Catholique de Louvain)
        avec une réflexion philosophique sur le rapport entre philosophie et imaginaire sonore


        Clôture des travaux
        - F. Buè et A. Vannini

        Lieu de la manifestation : UFR SLHS - Sciences du langage, de l'homme et de la société 30-32 rue Mégevand 25000 Besançon
        Organisation : Francesco Buè (Université catholique de Louvain) ; Angelo Vannini (ISTA - Institut des sciences et techniques de l'Antiquité)
        Contact : f.bue[at]uclouvain.be


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        BBC, 'How Corrupt is the Antiques Trade?' Business Daily Tue 18 Sep 2018
        What is the true price of the world's looted art and antiques? Is art dealing a corrupt business and does some of it fund terrorism? What about the role of museums?

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      • 09/18/18--05:04: Publishing Archaeology
      • Over the weekend, I read Amara Thorton’s Archaeologists in Print: Publishing for the People (UCL 2018). The book documents the efforts by late 19th and 20th century archaeologists to publish popular and accessible works on archaeology. She brings together these books with deep dives in the publishers’ and archaeologists’ archives and offers intriguing perspectives on how and why archaeologists worked with publishers to produce accessible, popular books that introduced the public to their sites, outlined the value of scientific practices, and allowed for more thoughtful tourism to the Eastern Mediterranean. 

        More than that, it provided important insights into the professionalization of the discipline. Many of the characters of Thorton’s book were full-time, Mediterranean archaeologists who looked to popular publishing to fund their work both directly through the proceeds and by attracting subscribers to support their excavations. At the same time publishers recognized the potential audience for popular works on archaeology. An interest in archaeology paralleled the growing interest in travel and tourism among an expanding and literate middle class. The turn of the 20th century was also the start of a golden age of publishing in the UK where it was possible to produce, distribute, and sell low cost books. In short there existed the infrastructure, the audience and the motivation for popular works in archaeology. 

        The book got me thinking about a few things as an archaeologist and a publisher. These are not meant to be critiques of the book, but rather reflections on whether the situation that Thorton documented in the early 20th century might have significance for 21st century academics. 

        1. Popularizing Archaeology. Over the last decade, there has been more and more of a call for academics to produce popular works for the general public. While I’m not opposed to this idea, I’ve often thought that the recent pressure on academics – particularly in the humanities – to share their research in popular ways was out of step with the realities of academic work. For example, most academics do not have the time to pursue vigorously both research and popular writing. Both require more than just a casual commitment to the task to be successful. Secondly, producing high quality popular history or archaeology requires the commitment of publishers and editors to work with faculty to produce accessible works that will sell to audiences. Third, there has to be an audience for this work at a scale that is sustainable for the investment from publishers. Finally, such work needs to be institutionally incentivized because writing for the public will detract from our other responsibilities whether those are research or teaching or service.

        Finally, and most importantly, calls for humanities scholars to be more engaged with the general public tend to overlook that full-time scholars in the humanities teach (or are in public facing positions at, say, museums or historical sites). In other words, we already make our work accessible on a daily basis to our students.

        2. Funding the Future. It was particularly striking that relatively few of the authors in Thorton’s book had regular teaching positions. Some had research positions a museums or universities or other administrative posts to support their travels and work, but few had access to the resources that we have today. The motivation to publish for a popular audience was not, then, the recognition that the public deserved to understand the work of archaeologists, but rather often driven by financial necessity. With the rise of grant and institutionally funded research in the mid-20th century, the need to write for the public declined. 

        In the 21st century, funding for research in archaeology and history looks to be an increasing challenge for academics. Not only are the number of tenure-track positions in decline (with their access both to institutional stability and the sustained investment in research), but research dollars from federal coffers (via the NEH and NSF, for example) increasingly scarce and competitive to acquire. On the one hand, this would appear to be the perfect opportunity for a new wave of popular archaeology to support research and scholarly writing. In fact, this kind of market-driven view of academic work seems to inform attitudes at the NEH and among university administrators. At its best, this would seem to suggest a more democratic approach to research.

        On the other hand, this approach to funding research – or at least the view that accessibility should be a criteria for funding research – creates an arena where the market drives research as much as research questions and problems. Of course, this already occurs in the sciences, where applied research receives more funding than basic science, and that has shifted the character of university research. It would be intriguing (and to my mind, not entirely positive) to imagine how shifting attention to popular research in the humanities would shape the future discipline.

        3. Possibilities of Publishing. Pushing academics to publish popular works may also require a shift in how publishing itself works. There are no lack of publishers looking to monetize the production of scholars and some of the more intriguing passages of Thorton’s work demonstrate that this was the case in the early 20th century as well. In fact, Thorton’s work shows a balance between books commissioned by publishers and works proposed by authors.

        In the 21st century, it’s never been easier to publish popular works, but the audience for these works (and the competition to get them recognized) has never been more fierce. Getting a book recognized is harder than just producing good content, but also requires savvy advertising, careful attention to production, and getting access to institutional markets as well individual subscribers. As archaeology looks to the new ways of disseminating knowledge, publishing also goes beyond the traditional print media platforms to codex style books. As Thorton notes, the mid-20th century saw a number of cross media ventures which crossed from print-book popularity to radio and then television. The complexities of these markets in the 21st century – especially in the age of YouTube, streaming audio, podcasts, and social media – puts added pressure on publishers and popularizers to figure out how to get their work into the hands of an appreciative audience. An iconic book cover – like Penguin Books’ famous Pelican covers – isn’t enough (although it doesn’t hurt). 

        All this other stuff – from design to marketing and promotion – represents investments of money, time, and expertise. Popular publishing requires more than academic will, but also investment from consumers and publishers needed to develop the infrastructure to accommodate and promote significant works across a range of media platforms. 

        If Archaeologists in Print was written to describe popular archaeological publishing in the 21st century, it would be a very different book, even if some of the main contours of the discipline remained the same.

         

         


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        Trismegistos is happy to announce a further step towards a completely innovated online interface. This time we have tackled the core database, Trismegistos Texts. We have developed a new detail page that offers easier access to all related information (e.g. words, people, places, …). But we have also tackled our search page, and it should now be much easier to search for specific texts in Trismegistos. There is only a single field in which users can type publications sigels, inventory numbers or even names of texts (e.g. 'Rosetta Stone’ or ‘Charta Borgiana’). The algorithm in the background should ideally convert everything according to our conventions, or offer possible alternatives for typos etc. Although we hope to have implemented enough flexibility for users to find what they are looking for, we know that there is still much work to do. But we think it is a good step towards a tool that will be able to cope with any reference to a text, and which in the future we hope to offer as an API and use in the context of text mining or annotation in pdf’s.

        Please note that for searches for sets of texts according to criteria you still have to use the old interface or approach the solution through related tables such as Places or Authors. We hope to get something up and running for sets of texts before long as well. 

        For Trismegistos,

        Yanne Broux (CSS, HTML, Javascript)
        Mark Depauw (PHP, MySQL)

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      • 09/18/18--09:58: TBA
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        Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 6:30pm

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        Kress Lecture
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      • 09/18/18--09:58: TBA
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        Tuesday, April 16, 2019
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      • 09/18/18--11:06: Twee nieuwe Stenen in Gent
      • Archeologen van BAAC Vlaanderen waren de afgelopen weken druk aan het werk in de buurt van de Vlasmarkt in Gent. Een vooronderzoek eerder dit jaar toonde beloftevolle zaken op een terrein aan de Oude Schaapmarkt. De archeologen werden niet teleurgesteld. “Maar liefst twee middeleeuwse huisplattegronden in Doornikse kalksteen met bijhorende structuren kwamen aan het licht,” zegt projectleider Robrecht Vanoverbeke. “Niet alleen is Gent dus twee ‘Steenen’ rijker, vooral het feit dat een volledig erf werd onderzocht is een unicum in de stad.”

        Hoewel de uitwerking nog volop loopt, kunnen de archeologen de geschiedenis van de onderzochte terreinen al ruwweg schetsen. 

        Aan het einde van de 12de, of begin van de daaropvolgende 13de eeuw, werd op een natte locatie een groot erf geïnstalleerd waarbij als bouwmateriaal de voor Gent typische Doornikse kalksteen werd gehanteerd. Het erf van 45m bij 22m wordt omzoomd door een omheiningsmuur met steunberen. Binnen dit ‘tuinhek’, voorzien van een stevige toegangspoort, bevond zich het woonhuis dat ca. 10m breed en 18m lang was. In één van de zijgevels bevonden zich nog drie raamopeningen én de deuropening, mét hengsel en dorpel (waarin ook het grendelgat van de deur nog zichtbaar was).

        Binnen het huis werd nog een klein restant van de natuurstenen vloer opgemerkt tussen 8 steunpilaren. Net buiten het huis bevond zich de beerput, eveneens opgebouwd uit dezelfde grijze natuursteen. Op basis van de vulling is deze vanaf de 12de tot minstens de 14de eeuw gebruikt.

        Net buiten de omheiningsmuur, bij de buren, werd in het midden van de 13de eeuw een tweede groot pand opgetrokken in baksteen (sommige tot 32 cm lang) en Doornikse kalksteen. Dit pand meet 24m bij 7 m. De functie van het gebouw is nog niet zeker. Er zijn redenen om aan te nemen dat het mogelijk een badhuis of een gebouw met ambachtelijke functie was.

        Middeleeuwse burgerlijke gebouwen uit Doornikse kalksteen krijgen in Gent een S-nummer. Dan worden ze officieel een ‘Steen’. De twee gevonden gebouwen werden S229 en S230 gedoopt.

        Bron en foto: BAAC Vlaanderen


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        A red, crosshatched design adorning a rock from a South African cave may take the prize as the oldest known drawing. Ancient humans sketched the line pattern around 73,000 years ago by running a chunk of pigment across a smoothed section of stone in Blombos Cave, scientists say. Until now, the earliest drawings dated to roughly 40,000 years ago on cave walls in Europe and Indonesia.

        The discovery “helps round out the argument that Homo sapiens [at Blombos Cave] behaved essentially like us before 70,000 years ago,” says archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood of the University of Bergen in Norway. His team noticed the ancient drawing while examining thousands of stone fragments and tools excavated in 2011 from cave sediment. Other finds have included 100,000- to 70,000-year-old pigment chunks engraved with crosshatched and line designs (SN Online: 6/12/09), 100,000-year-old abalone shells containing remnants of a pigment-infused paint (SN: 11/19/11, p. 16) and shell beads from around the same time.

        The faded pattern consists of six upward-oriented lines crossed at an angle by three slightly curved lines, the researchers report online September 12 in Nature. Microscopic and chemical analyses showed that the lines were composed of a reddish, earthy pigment known as ocher. An illustration of ancient crosshatched lines of pigment applied to a stone shows what the larger pattern would have looked like as it extended beyond the edges of the surviving piece of rock.

        The lines end abruptly at the rock’s edges, indicating that a larger and possibly more complex version of the drawing originally appeared on a bigger stone, the researchers say. Tiny pigment particles dotted the rock’s drawing surface, which had been ground smooth. Henshilwood suspects the chunk of rock was part of a large grinding stone on which people scraped pieces of pigment into crayonlike shapes.

        Crosshatched designs similar to the drawing have been found engraved on shells at the site, Henshilwood says. So the patterns may have held some sort of meaning for their makers. But it’s hard to know whether the crossed lines represent an abstract idea or a real-life concern. Some modern hunter-gatherer societies create abstract-looking designs that actually depict animals, objects or people, he says.

        Whatever the drawing’s original significance, it shows that Stone Age folk in southern Africa communicated something they considered important by applying crosshatched patterns to different surfaces, says archaeologist Paul Pettitt of Durham University in England. “If there is any point at which one can say that symbolic activity had emerged in human society, this is it.”

        Experimental reproductions of the crosshatched pigment pattern, drawn on rocks like those at the South African cave, indicate that the lines were intentionally produced and were originally darker and better defined, he says. Previous evidence also suggested that ancient humans at the cave used pigment as a glue ingredient and possibly as a sunscreen. But the experimental drawings produced too little powder to use as a glue additive or a sunblock. Ancient pigment wielders appear to have wanted only to draw a design on the stone.


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        Thousands of years ago in what is now northern Israel, waves of migrating people from the north and east - present-day Iran and Turkey - arrived in the region. And this influx of newcomers had a profound effect, transforming the emerging culture. What's more, these immigrants introduced new genes - such as the mutation that produces blue eyes - that were previously unknown in that geographic area, according to a new study.

        Archaeologists recently discovered this historic population shift by analyzing DNA from skeletons preserved in an Israeli cave. The site, in the north of the country, contains dozens of burials and more than 600 bodies dating to approximately 6,500 years ago, the scientists reported. DNA analysis showed that skeletons preserved in the cave were genetically distinct from people who historically lived in that region. And some of the genetic differences matched those of people who lived in neighboring Anatolia and the Zagros Mountains, which are now part of Turkey and Iran, the study found.

        Ancient Israel experienced a significant cultural shift during the Late Chalcolithic period, around 4500 to 3800 BCE, with denser settlements, more rituals performed in public and a growing use of ossuaries in funerary preparations, the researchers reported.
        The authors of the new study suspected that waves of human migration explained the changes. To find answers, the scientists turned to a burial site in Israel's Peqi'in Cave.

        Measuring around 56 feet (17 m) long and about 16 to 26 feet (5 to 8 m) wide, the cave contained decorated jars and burial offerings - along with hundreds of skeletons - suggesting that the location served as a type of mortuary for Chalcolithic people who lived nearby. However, not all of the cave's contents appeared to have local origins, study co-author Dina Shalem, an archaeologist with the Institute for Galilean Archaeology at Kinneret College in Israel, said in a statement.

        The scientists sampled DNA from bone powder from 48 skeletal remains and were able to reconstruct genomes for 22 individuals found in the cave. The scientists found that these individuals shared genetic features with people from the north, and those similar genes were absent in farmers who lived in the region earlier.

        The scientists also discovered that genetic diversity increased within groups over time, while genetic differences between groups decreased; this is a pattern that typically emerges in populations after a period of human migration, according to the researchers. "The publication of the artifacts from Peqi'in has shown many cultural links between these regions, but it will be interesting to see, in the future, whether those links are genetic as well," said Daniel Master, a professor of archaeology at Wheaton College in Illinois.

        Edited from LiveScience (24 August 2018)
        http://tinyurl.com/yaxydamj

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        Shanidar Cave NeanderthalsERBIL, KURDISTAN—Kurdistan 24 reports that the remains of two additional Neanderthals have been found in Shanidar Cave, where the fossils of 10 Neanderthal individuals have been unearthed since the 1950s. “What we have here is the skull of a Neanderthal adult,” said British paleoanthropologist Emma Pomeroy, who is working with an international team of scientists at the site. “It’s been quite badly squashed by the stones and all the soil on top of it, but it’s actually fairly complete.” The individual’s lower jaw, upper jaw, teeth, and eye sockets are visible on the partially excavated bone. The other individual is underneath the first, and Pomeroy added that it appears that a rock was put on top of the burials. Other burials may be found in the area. “We hope to build a strong picture of how they lived here, what their life was like, and what they did when members of their group died,” she said. For more, go to “A Traditional Neanderthal Home.”


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        Egypt Aswan mummyASWAN, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that a sandstone sarcophagus containing a mummy was recovered from one of three tombs discovered on the western bank of the Nile River in Aswan during an archaeological survey. The linen-wrapped mummy, which dates to the Late Period (ca. 712–332 B.C.), is in good condition, but has not yet been identified. A collection of mummies was also found in the area, which may have been used as a communal tomb. One of the chambers held the head of a sandstone statue, amulets made of colored stones, a small wooden statue of the god Horus, and wall paintings depicting the gods Hathor, Isis, and Anubis. To read about another tomb discovered in the Aswan area, go to “Afterlife on the Nile.”