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(showing articles 1 to 50 of 50)

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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia
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    Review of Carsten Wilke, Farewell to Shulamit: Spatial and Social Diversity in the Song of Songs. Jewish thought, philosophy and religion, 2. Berlin, Boston: 2017. Pp. viii, 170. $91.99. ISBN 9783110500547.

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    Review of Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, Staging Memory, Staging Strife: Empire and Civil War in the ‘Octavia’. Oxford; New York: 2017. Pp. xii, 229. $74.00. ISBN 9780190275952.

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  • 10/21/17--01:38: Cemetery Walking Tour
  • Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Texas Historical Commission
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 10:00am

    Join us for a tour of historic Willow Wild Cemetery on Saturday, October 28 at 10:00 a.m. We will meet at Sam Rayburn's grave near the entrance gates to Willow Wild.  Refreshments available.  Free.  10 a.m. – 12 p.m. at Willow Wild Cemetery.

    Location

    Name: 
    Anne Ruppert
    Telephone: 
    9035835558
    Call for Papers: 
    no
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by National Park Service
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    fair
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 10:00am

    Join us for our Annual Rio Grande Delta International Archaeology Fair at the Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Park.  The Rio Grande Delta International Archeology Fair is designed to provide the community with an opportunity to learn about the field of Archeology, local archeological resources, and the value of resource preservation through displays, demonstrations and activities.  The fair includes educational games and activities for visitors of all ages. The event is free and for audiences of all ages. Free. Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Rolando Garza
    Telephone: 
    956-541-2785
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    Call for Papers: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Art and Art History
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 4:00pm

    Lecture by Emily Umberger.  In Aztec society jade, tropical feathers, gold, and turquoise, were prized for reasons that involved competing notions of “moral economy,” according to Igor Kopytoff’s definition of the term. For the Aztecs, these materials and objects made from them were valued both for their inherent sacred powers in traditional ideology, and for their powers as objects of wealth and prestige in a rapidly growing commercial economy.

    Location

    Name: 
    Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin
    Telephone: 
    512-471-1695
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    Call for Papers: 
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  • 10/21/17--02:50: Park After Dark
  • Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Denton County Office of History and Culture
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    exhibition
    Start Date: 
    Friday, October 20, 2017 - 6:00pm
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 6:00pm

    On the night of Saturday November 22, 1919 an argument took place outside the Bayless residence, an argument that ended in death...  Travel through the Bayless-Selby House, located at 317 W Mulberry Street, to hear the accounts of key witnesses, town gossips, and from our own volunteers who have experienced more than a few unusual instances inside the house. Tours will be given throughout the night.  Sponsored by the Denton County Office of History and Culture.  Free.  Friday and Saturday 6-9 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Office of History and Culture
    Telephone: 
    940-349-2850
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Content: 

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  • 10/21/17--02:51: Paul Stanhope
  • I discovered Paul Stanhope’s music through the Naxos Music Database, which introduced me to his wonderful Concerto for Piccolo and Orchestra. I will include that later in the post. But branching out from there, I discovered other music which intersects with my interests related to the Bible (and of course, the Bible and music). One […]

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by El Paso Museum of Archeology
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 2:00pm

    Lecture by Robert Dello-Russo, Ph.D.  The recent discovery of the Water Canyon Paleoindian site has opened a new window into our understanding of the early human occupation of the Southwest in general and New Mexico in particular.  Interdisciplinary research at the site since 2008, has included not only archaeological studies, but also investigations of an extensive fossil wet land (or “black mat”) where proxy data have been collected for paleo-environmental reconstruction, paleoclimatic research and landform evolution during the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition (ca.

    Location

    Name: 
    Jeff Romney
    Telephone: 
    915-755-4332
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by El Paso Museum of Archaeology, and the Tom Lea Institute
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    exhibition
    other
    Start Date: 
    Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 1:00pm

    Please join us on Sunday, October 29th from at the El Paso Museum of Archaeology (EPMArch) for an afternoon of Tom Lea inspired activities for all ages including painting and plastic pottery making. At 1:00 PM EPMArch Director Jeff Romney will give a presentation on Casas Grandes pottery highlighting pieces on display from the Tom Lea collection. Free.  1 - 4 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Jeff Romney
    Telephone: 
    915-755-4332
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Content: 

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Fort McKavett State Historic Site, Johnson Space Center Astronomical Society, Friends of Fort McKavett, and the Texas Historical Commission
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    exhibition
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 10:00am

    Join us at Fort McKavett State Historic Site for a day and night of exploration. Fort McKavett will display various temporary exhibits featuring archaeological information about the Fort and the greater Concho Valley Area.  After dusk, the Johnson Space Center Astronomical Society will host a free public star party on the Parade Grounds.  Sponsored by Fort McKavett State Historic Site, Johnson Space Center Astronomical Society, Friends of Fort McKavett, and the Texas Historical Commission.  $4 for adults, $3 for children ages 6-18, and Free for children under 6.  10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Kevin Malcolm
    Telephone: 
    325-396- 2358
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Texas Archeological Society; Hosted by the Tarrant County Archeological Society
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    conference
    Start Date: 
    Friday, October 20, 2017 - 9:00am to Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 12:00pm

    Join us for the 88th Annual Meeting at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Grapevine, hosted by the Tarrant County Archeological Society.  The Annual Meeting schedule is familiar and begins on Friday morning with Council of Texas Archeologist (CTA) meetings followed by Texas Historical Commission Stewards and the TAS Board Meetings.  Also on Friday afternoon, there will be a CTA Seminar and we will begin paper presentations.  On Friday night, we will have out Public Forum with Dr.

    Location

    Name: 
    Texas Archeological Society
    Telephone: 
    512-245-1696
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Content: 

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org, Inc.
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    other
    Start Date: 
    Friday, October 20, 2017 - 1:00pm to Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 12:00pm

    The Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org is pleased to announce the TAS Book Festival will return on its bi-annual schedule as part of the TASS Annual Meeting in Grapevine, Texas.  There is already a terrific line-up of authors planning to join us.  Our authors will make presentations related to their new publications and will be selling and signing their new books for member of the Society and public.  The event will begin Friday afternoon, October 20th, beginning at 1:00 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Texas Archeological Society
    Telephone: 
    5122451696
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Houston Museum of Natural Science, the Houston Archeological Society, the Texas Department of Transportation, and several other local groups
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    fair
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 10:00am

    The Houston Archeological Society (HAS) would like to invite you (and your organization) to participate in our annual celebration of all things archaeological.

    Location

    Name: 
    Linda Gorski
    Telephone: 
    713-557-1496
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
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  • 10/21/17--04:06: Review of Bible Nation
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/vakkOdIqEMo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/vgwHONs33mQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Kaufman County Historical Commission
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:00am

    Kaufman County Historical Commission will set a booth up at the Annual City of Kaufman Scarecrow Festival with activities for the kids and adults to learn more about Archeology and to share the history of Kaufman County.  Free.  9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

    Location

    Name: 
    Buzz Fanion
    Telephone: 
    972-210-1665
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Content: 

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  • 10/21/17--04:20: Spellbinding music
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/KHZKazhOrPI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/lXDzqv7Y-LA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Caldwell County Historical Commission
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Friday, October 20, 2017 - 6:30pm
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 6:30pm

    Join the Caldwell County Historical Commission for the 13th Annual Speaking of the Dead Night Ramblings in a Texas Graveyard.  $15.  6:30 – 9:10 pm.  Tickets available at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-speaking-of-the-dead-lockhart-cemetery-tour-tickets-37159719722.

    Location

    Name: 
    Kathy McCormick
    Telephone: 
    512-626-1637
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Content: 

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  • 10/21/17--06:05: Weekend Roundup
  • The Israel Antiquities Authority has arrested looters who discovered a cave in a Galilean village that was used for storage and stables in the Roman period.

    Aren Maeir reports on a “mini-season” they held this week at Gath.

    The “Bible Marathon” traces the route of the Benjamite who raced to tell Eli of the death of his sons.

    One month before its opening in Washington, DC, the Museum of the Bible held a press conference to address questions about the museum’s practices.

    The abandoned village of Lifta, possibly the site of biblical Mei Nephtoah, has been named one of 25 Endangered World Monuments.

    The New York Times has an article in its dining section on the ancient Canaanite food and wine of Tel Kabri.

    The Winter 2017 issue of DigSight reports on an exhibit on seals, a seal of “Ushna, servant of Ahaz,” and more.

    Carl Rasmussen has begun a series on Paul’s shipwreck on Malta.

    The Lod Mosaic will have a home when the Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Archaeological Center opens in 2019.

    Volcanic activity may have played a significant role in the demise of the Egyptian Ptolemaic dynasty.

    Israel’s Good Name describes his recent camping trip in Park HaMaayanot.

    Prof. Zvi Lederman will be giving a lecture on Nov 13 at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology entitled “A Lost Queen of the Sun -- Tel Beth Shemesh, the Age of Amarna, and the Mysterious ‘Mistress of the Lions.’” The lecture is free and open to the public.

    Matthew Suriano will be lecturing on Nov. 16 at Brandeis University on “A Tomb with a View: What can we learn about death in the Hebrew Bible from the Silwan Necropolis in Jerusalem?”

    Eisenbrauns’ Deal of the Weekend is Unearthing Jerusalem, at 60% off.

    The end of an era: Penn State University Press has acquired Eisenbrauns.

    HT: Charles Savelle, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis


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    Low numbers of comments to CPAC suggest low public support for a renewed MOU with Cambodia.  Indeed, though most of the twenty-one (21) comments were supportive of the renewed MOU, virtually all these came from archaeologists who depend on Cambodian excavation permits or their associated archaeological advocacy groups.  Meanwhile, it is finally dawning on some in Congress that MOUs have devolved into special interest programs for archaeologists.  Significantly, Congressional appropriators have required CPAC to report on the expenditures MOU partner countries make in securing their own cultural patrimony.  Hopefully, this will help change a culture that has vilified collectors to help divert attention away from poor stewardship of archaeological resources by source countries.

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    My classical pumpkin this year features the famous image of Achilles and Penthesilea. Didn’t turn out too badly….


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  • 10/21/17--11:58: Classical pumpkin 2017
  • Classical pumpkin 2017:

    Here’s the vlog  - see how it turned out and my general thoughts on it all.


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    A week or so ago I saw on Twitter a quotation attributed to John Chrysostom, which read as follows:

    Chrysostom liked to gloat that the apostles had gagged the tongues of the philosophers and stitched shut the mouths of the rhetoricians.

    The author of the tweet was a certain Catherine Nixey, who is an arts journalist for the Times of London.  She has a book out claiming that the Christians deliberately destroyed almost all ancient literature, or some illiterate nonsense like that.

    The tweet appeared in a thread which began here like this:

    Patrick Walsh‏ @Walsh_e_Patrick Sep 7
    Did Christians erase classical wisdom? Stunning advance copies of THE DARKENING AGE by Catherine Nixey just in – publication 21st September

    I’m not sure who Patrick Walsh is, but he seems to post announcements of book launches.  Anyone this one met with criticism, and @catherinenixey joined in in response.  She then posted our tweet above.  (The link to her tweet is here; but there is now no purpose in clicking that link, as we shall see.)  I happened to see it; and responded.  Screen grabs are below!

    As I always do, I wondered whether John Chrysostom did say this, and if so, in what context.  So I needed a source.  As I went along, I replied to Nixey, starting here:

    Her response was to brush my results aside and demand I follow her so that she could talk to me by direct message.  She did this a couple of times.

    And then… suddenly she deleted her account.  This I discovered when I logged in, intending to write to her.

    Then I messaged George Morley, who seems to be her publisher, asking why her account had vanished.  I saw no reply.  So I can only infer that her publisher got windy about how things were going, and told her to stop tweeting fast.

    Rather than peering at those screen grabs, let me lay out what I saw.

    A google search quickly revealed her source.  This proved to be Dirk Rohmann’s Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, De Gruyter (2016), Google Books preview page 207 (actually p.202 in the printed book):

    Name-checking Pythagorean philosophy, John [Chrysostom] justifies the obliteration of ancient philosophies by the beginning of the Gospel of John, implying that the word (lógos) of God is absolute and unchallenged: “Has not all that with good cause perished and been utterly obliterated? – Indeed with good cause and according to the Word!”⁹ In his Demonstration against the Jews and Pagans John demonstrates Jesus’ divinity as a corollary of the success of Christianisation and the subsequent dissolution of the ancient traditions.¹⁰ This, he suggests, is because the apostles were given power over the demons. In John’s metaphorical words, the apostles have “gagged the tongues of the philosophers and stitched shut the mouths of the rhetoricians.”¹¹ This passage echoes a similar statement in an unpublished manuscript (attributed to John) which asserts that “the senate decrees have been overthrown, the philosophers and orators have been put to shame, and the Areopagus has been wiped out.”¹² This statement could be right because it is attested that in the last quarter of the fourth century large private mansions were constructed on the Areopagus hill, traditionally a place that housed archives.¹³

    So there is not much question about where Nixey got her idea of Chrysostom gloating over the destruction of pagan literature.  Footnote 11 supplies the reference:

    11. Chrys. Jud. et gent. 5.3 (PG 48:820): φιλοσόφων ἐπιστομίζειν γλῶσσαν, ῤητόρων ἀποῤῥάπτειν στόματα.

    This is Chrysostom, Against the Jews and Pagans, a little known work.  Certainly these words say what Nixey said – they gagged the tongues of the philosophers, they stitched shut the mouths of the rhetoricians.

    But that quote gives no context.  What we need is an English translation.  I learned from the bibliography at Fourth Century that one does exist, in Fathers of the Church 73, Chrysostom Apologist, p.210-11.  So here is, not just six words, but the whole of chapter 5.  It is not long.

    Chapter 5
    The Mission of the Apostles Foretold

    (1) After these events, he would send forth his apostles, as Isaiah had foretold. “How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the gospel of peace, of those who bring glad tidings of good things,”‘ he said. Look what part of the body he praised. He lauded their feet, which took them everywhere they went. Furthermore, David showed the manner and source of their strength and success when he said: “The Lord shall give the word to them who preach the good tidings with great power.”

    (2) It would not be by wielding weapons, nor by expenditure of money, nor by strength of body, nor by abundance of armies, nor by any other such means that the apostles would conquer the world. They would gain victory by a mere word, since that word had great power and was proved by signs and wonders. For they preached Christ crucified, they wrought miracles and. in this way, they conquered the world. It was on this account that David said: “The Lord shall give the word to them who preach the good tidings with great power,”‘ because this was his way of speaking of the miracles and wonders they worked.

    (3) And it was the result of an ineffable power that the fisherman, the publican, and the tent maker, at their mere commands, raised the dead to life, drove out demons, drove off death, stopped the tongues of philosophers, stitched shut the mouths of rhetoricians, overcame kings and rulers, and were victorious over barbarians, pagans, and every nation.

    (4) Indeed, David described the situation well in that way. For it was by that word which God gave them that they accomplished all those things they did. And it was with God’s great power that they brought the dead back to life, changed sinners into just men, restored sight to the blind, and drove out disease from the body and evil from the soul. And where did they get that power? That it came from the Holy Spirit is made quite clear from these words: “And they were filled with the Spirit,”’ and both men and women prophesied.

    (5) Tongues seen in the form of fire settled on each one of them, as Joel had long before predicted when he said: “I shall pour out a portion of my spirit on all flesh, and your sons will prophesy and your daughters will see visions, and your young men will dream dreams before the coming of the great and illustrious day of the Lord.” [By “the great and illustrious day” he meant both the day of the Spirit and the day which would come at the consummation of the world.] This same prophet predicted salvation through faith—for he did not remain silent on this—when he said: “And it will be that whoever will call on the name of the Lord will be saved

    Surely this is just a preacher, going through the events of Acts?  Nothing more.  How is this innocent retelling of the Acts, of the doings of Peter, Paul, and friends, a call for book-burning, fire and sword?  What sort of person would read this like that?

    Anyway I posted the screen grab, and asked Catherine Nixey whether she felt that her “quote”, verbally accurate though it was, was a fair representation of what Chrysostom wrote.

    Her response was to delete her account.  And that makes me feel rather guilty.  I hope that I did not do her harm.

    One final thought.  In view of the attempt to erase the discussion, probably by the publisher, here is a screen grab demonstrating that the @catherinenixey account did indeed exist.  It’s not much; but I am unaccustomed to this kind of thing, so I did not capture her comments.

    Does anyone know how to see deleted tweets?


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    Almost everyone knows the story of the death of Julius Caesar, as Shakespeare has reminded us. He was assassinated on the Ides of March 44 BC by a group of disgruntled Senators who believed him to be on a path to become dictator and destroy the Republic.

    The truth is Caesar was merely one of many who pushed the Republic to extinction. The collapse began in 133 BC with the murder of Tiberius Gracchus, continued through the dictatorships of Marius and Sulla, and ended with the formation of the Principate under Augustus in 30 BC. That didn’t matter to the Senate of 44 BC that was struggling to hold on to power.

    Caesar’s image had been carefully cultivated by his followers prior to and after his ascension to power. His military accomplishments were advertised and his efforts on behalf of the people were socialized. Caesar was a patrician, latest member of the ancient family of the Julii, which dated to the founding of Rome. That historical link helped lend a sense of honor and stability to the name Caesar.

    Caesar’s greatest offence was to put his image on Roman coins, a place previously reserved for the gods. This was calculated symbolism designed to reinforce the notion that Caesar himself was a god, and this was proven by his image on the coins.

    But this was a marketing campaign aimed directly at the people and never bought into by the Senate, so they assassinated him as a threat to their power.

    Appian describes Caesar’s funeral and its melodrama.

    Caesar’s father-in-law, Piso brought his body to the forum and it was placed on the rostra surrounded by an armed guard. The large crowd was of one emotion and Antony saw it as his role to whip them into a fever pitch.

    It is not right, my fellow-citizens, for the funeral oration in praise of so great a man to be delivered by me, a single individual, instead of by his whole country.

    Antony went on to read out all the honors bestowed on Caesar, one at a time, using words like "sacrosanct", "inviolate", "father of his country", "benefactor", or "leader", a combination never used to describe another Roman.

    And he read out the oaths, by which they all undertook to protect Caesar and Caesar's person with all their might… those who failed to defend him were to be accursed.

    Antony turned to the body and chanted heavenly praise for the dead man,

    And you", he said, "were also the only man to avenge the violence offered to your country 300 years ago, by bringing to their knees the savage peoples who were the only ones ever to break in to Rome and set fire to it."This is a reference to Caesar’s victory over the Gauls who had attacked Rome in 390 BC.

    Antony took the cape that covered Caesar’s body, stuck it on a spear, and waved it about so the crowd could observe the blood stains on it. By now the crowd had worked itself into a frenzy and was demanding the death of the assassins who had struck down their leader. Suddenly a wax body of Caesar rose above the rostra for all to see. It was sitting on a platform and attached to a mechanical device which utilized a crank to make the body rotate. On it were painted 23 marks of blood showing the locations of the stab wounds on Caesar’s body. Round and round it went for all to see.

    When Antony was finished, people rushed to the rostra with the intent to take Caesar’s body up Capitoline Hill and burn it at the most sacred site in the city. But the priests intervened saying that the risk of an uncontrolled fire was too great and they would not allow the body to be burned there. So the people carried Caesar’s body to the east end of Forum square intending to create a funeral pyre there. They grabbed wooden benches and broke them up to provide fuel for the fire.

    After the fire was lit, it burned for twenty-four hours in the midst of a crowd of thousands. Years later, the Temple of the Divine Caesar was constructed on that site. Today, the temple is gone, and only a part of the altar remains. Still, there are Romans who place flowers there every day in honor of the great man.

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    “cdli tablet” joins the Android family

    cdli tablet is now available for Android mobile devices! Focusing on the cultural heritage of ancient Mesopotamia, the app combines text and images documenting three millennia of human activity that includes the earliest recorded development of trade, mathematics, and astronomy. Users will follow the application of the law of an eye for an eye by the Old Babylonian king Hammurapi, and will relive the exploits of Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Striking images of selected cuneiform texts and related artifacts are placed in their historical setting with short narratives prepared by experts in the languages and archaeology of the ancient Near East, but also by college students approaching a distant world with fresh eyes.
     
    Sponsored by the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) based at UCLA's Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, cdli tablet, inspired by the elegantly simple “guardian eyewitness” (sadly disbanded in 2014 and merged in the general Guardian app), was originally created in 2013 as an iPad app by then UCLA Computer Science graduate student Sai Deep Tetali and Assyriology Professor Robert K. Englund. In 2017, Prashant Rajput, UCLA CS graduate student, and Altaf Shaikh, mobile developer, built an improved version for tablets and smartphones running with Android (laptop and PC users can still scroll through the entries here). With its daily update of entries written to follow particular themes in Babylonian history—topics ranging from the origins of writing 3500 years before the time of Christ to current efforts to digitally preserve and globally disseminate Mesopotamia’s cultural heritage—the app will appeal to diverse learning communities of all ages and levels of interest.
     
    Cuneiformists, archaeologists, art historians, curators and related specialists who have an intimate acquaintance with ancient Near Eastern artifacts and digitally preserved collections are invited to contribute future entries to our cdli tablet calendar; we offer easy-to-follow steps and  to prepare files that will introduce a general and interested public to the fascinating sources they work with.
     

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    Dissertationes Archaeologicae ex Instituto Archaeologico Universitatis de Rolando Eötvös Nominatae

    http://dissarch.elte.hu/public/journals/1/homeHeaderTitleImage_en_US.jpg

    Table of Contents

    Articles

    Öcsöd-Kováshalom. A retrospective look at the interpretations of a Late Neolithic site READ | DOWNLOAD
    Pál Raczky, András Füzesi 9-42
    Frührömische keramische Beigaben im Gräberfeld von Budaörs READ | DOWNLOAD
    Gabriella Delbó 43-116
    Animal and human footprints on Roman tiles from Brigetio READ | DOWNLOAD
    Linda Dobosi 117-134
    Secondary use of base rings as drinking vessels in Aquincum READ | DOWNLOAD
    Kata Dévai 135-144
    Britannia on Roman coins READ | DOWNLOAD
    Lajos Juhász 145-160
    6th century ivory game pieces from Mosonszentjános READ | DOWNLOAD
    István Koncz, Zsuzsanna Tóth 161-178
    Cattle types in the Carpathian Basin in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Ages READ | DOWNLOAD
    Péter Csippán 179-212

    Methods

    Implication of non-invasive archaeological methods in Brigetio in 2016 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Dávid Bartus, Zoltán Czajlik, László Rupnik 213-232

    Field reports

    Grd-i Tle 2016. Preliminary Report of the Hungarian Archaeological Mission of the Eötvös Loránd University to Grd-i Tle (Saruchawa) in Iraqi Kurdistan READ | DOWNLOAD
    Tamás Dezső, Gábor Kalla, Maxim Mordovin, Zsófia Masek, Nóra Szabó, Barzan Baiz Ismail, Kamal Rasheed, Attila Weisz, Lajos Sándor, Ardalan Khwsnaw, Aram Ali Hama Amin 233-240
    The first season of the excavation of Grd-i Tle. The Fortifications of Grd-i Tle (Field 1) READ | DOWNLOAD
    Tamás Dezső, Maxim Mordovin 241-262
    The first season of the excavation of Grd-i Tle. The cemetery of the eastern plateau (Field 2) READ | DOWNLOAD
    Gábor Kalla, Nóra Szabó 263-276
    The first season of the excavation of Grd-i Tle. The Post-Medieval Settlement at Grd-i Tle (Field 1) READ | DOWNLOAD
    Zsófia Masek, Maxim Mordovin 277-290
    Short report on the archaeological research of the burial mounds no. 64. and no. 49 of Érd- Százhalombatta READ | DOWNLOAD
    Gabriella T. Németh, Zoltán Czajlik, Katalin Novinszki-Groma, András Jáky 291-306
    Short report on the archaeological research of the Late Iron Age cemetery at Gyöngyös READ | DOWNLOADREAD | DOWNLOAD
    Károly Tankó, Zoltán Tóth, László Rupnik, Zoltán Czajlik, Sándor Puszta 307-324
    How the floor-plan of a Roman domus unfolds. Complementary observations on the Pâture du Couvent (Bibracte) in 2016 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Lőrinc Timár 325-336
    Short report on the excavations in Brigetio in 2016 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Dávid Bartus, László Borhy, Nikoletta Sey, Emese Számadó 337-350
    Short report on the excavations in the Castle of Sátoraljaújhely in 2016 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Dóra Hegyi, Zsófia Nádai 351-360
    Excavations inside the 16th-century gate tower at the Castle Čabraď in 2016 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Maxim Mordovin 361-368

    Thesis abstracts

    The settling of the Alföld Linear Pottery Culture in Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg county. Microregional researches in the area of Mezőség in Nyírség READ | DOWNLOAD
    András Füzesi 369-394
    Early Copper Age settlement patterns in the Middle Tisza Region READ | DOWNLOAD
    Márton Szilágyi 395-402
    Hoarding practices in Central Transylvania in the Late Bronze Age READ | DOWNLOAD
    Botond Rezi 403-416
    The settlement structure of the North-Western part of the Carpathian Basin during the middle and late Early Iron Age. The Early Iron Age settlement at Győr-Ménfőcsanak (Hungary, Győr-Moson- Sopron county) READ | DOWNLOAD
    Éva Ďurkovič 417-426
    The trade of Pannonia in the light of amphorae (1st – 4th century AD) READ | DOWNLOAD
    Piroska Magyar-Hárshegyi 427-438
    Pottery industry of the Aquincum military town READ | DOWNLOAD
    Péter Vámos 439-448
    Settlement history of the Hernád Valley in the 1st to 4/5th centuries AD READ | DOWNLOAD
    Eszter Soós 449-466
    Archaeological research of the Hussite castles in the Sajó Valley READ | DOWNLOAD
    Gábor András Szörényi 467-476

    Reviews

    Marder, T. A. – Wilson Jones, M.: The Pantheon: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge 2015. Pp. xix + 471, 24 coloured plates and 165 figures. ISBN 978-0-521-80932-0 READ | DOWNLOAD
    Linda Dobosi 477-479

    Issues


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    Deborah Lehr is the recipient of the 2017 Hadrian Award, presented at World Monuments Fund’s 2017 Hadrian Gala in New York City on October 16, 2017.
    Lehr employs her vast professional expertise to safeguard and preserve antiquities under threat from conflict, extremism and looting in the Middle East and North Africa, most notably through the Antiquities Coalition, an organization she founded and leads as Chairman. Her leadership in U.S./China partnerships is also helping to advance sustainable urbanization and green economic development.


    Antiquities Coalition

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  • 10/21/17--22:28: Blocking Out Difficulties

  • The dealers and their lobbyists continue to withdraw from and alienate themselves from the heritage debate. AnthroPaulicy now reports:
    Katie A. Paul‏ @AnthroPaulicy
    W odpowiedzi do @ChasingAphrodit @cwjones89
    I “liked” these tweets so @ArtTradeSol blocked me. Haha I didn’t even participate in the conversation (although happy to)
    This is part of a pattern:

    (see here: james-mcandrew-has-no-solutions-lacks )







    and so on. I guess if you are a representative of a group of people who like retards think they can continue to do what they do in the same manner as they always did things in the nineteenth century, ignoring views different to your own may appeal as a possible way to make the problems go away. In the world of the grown ups however, the perception of how to deal with challenges will differ. 





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    The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s president and CEO, Daniel H. Weiss, has issued a statement opposing the U.S. Decision to Pull Out of UNESCO (Alex Greenberg, 'Metropolitan Museum of Art Issues Statement Against U.S. Decision to Pull Out of UNESCO' New York Times 10/12/17):
    One of our most important responsibilities as museum leaders is to protect cultural heritage and promote international education. For more than half a century The Met and countless other museums have successfully partnered with UNESCO, an organization that has earned the respect of nations and communities worldwide for bringing together curators, conservators, and a range of other scholars to educate, preserve, protect, and support the intellectual and artistic traditions of our shared cultural heritage. President Trump’s decision to withdraw from UNESCO undermines the historic role of the United States as a leader in this effort and weakens our position as a strong advocate for cultural preservation. Although UNESCO may be an imperfect organization, it has been an important leader and steadfast partner in this crucial work. The Met remains deeply committed to productive engagement with UNESCO and our colleagues around the world who share this important objective.
    Vignette: Daniel Weiss

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    Alex Macdonald, Researcher at Macquarie University (Oct 16 2017) summarises 'The Dirt on the Dubious Dead Sea Scrolls: curiosities to consider as more information emerges'.
    everyone thought that all the manuscripts and fragments from Qumran had been excavated and sold; the dominant dealer (known as Kando) suggested that the days of buying and selling DSS material were past. Nonetheless, since 2002 when an American dealer was offered an opportunity to buy more DSS, we have seen some 76 fragments come through the market for huge prices — hundreds of thousands of dollars, up to tens of millions. They seem to have come largely via one of Kando’s sons. Many of these are now in the collection of Martin Schøyen, and others are owned by various American evangelical institutions including the SouthWestern Baptist Theological Seminary and the new almost-open Museum of the Bible backed by the Hobby Lobby family (the Greens). All these fragments were bought on the premise that they were authentic antiquities, and volumes publishing the Schøyen fragments and the Museum of the Bible fragments have been published this year — but some of those papyri have been proven to be fake! In numerous instances this is through papyrological/ palaeographical methods, but in some cases (i.e. six fragments from the Schøyen collection) scientific testing has been conducted and confirmed the verdict of the scholars. This raises all sorts of questions including questions about how documents with no legitimate provenance information came into such collections.
    This is followed up by the author presenting 'a few things that I think are worth noting', and indeed they are. Including this one:

    There’s another enigma, a group with a cluster of related entities: “Ancient Discovery Investment Group”, “The American Judeo-Christian Heritage Foundation”, the “Artifact Research and Translation Foundation.” They want to bring a “priceless” collection of Dead Sea Scrolls — that is, the rest of William Kando’s scrolls — to America and thus “prove that mankind once enjoyed a relationship with deity.” The price is upward of THREE HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS! Despite the lack of overt reference to the fact, they seem to be a group of Mormons.
    Vignette: Authenticity as doubtful as this 'Jesus toast'.

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    At DC presser, Museum of Bible's David Trobisch says it won't display disputed Galatians fragment until it can resolve provenance questions.
    see my: 'Green Collection Objects "Yet to find a questionable piece"...'. PACHI Saturday, 5 September 2015
     and PACHI Saturday, 10 May 2014, 'Green Collection, well, there are collecting histories, and collecting histories'.


    As for why there are problems, see here:
     PACHI Friday, 16 January 2015:
    'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (1) Introduction',
    'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (2) Pap.Robs',
    '
    Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (3) 2011 AnonStash at Christie's',
    'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (4) "The Trusted Mister X"',
    I see I never managed to complete the fifth in the series.

    PACHI Friday, 23 January 2015
    'Sappho Pap. Obbink: Further Painting into Corners'.

    Then PACHI Thursday, 27 November 2014,
    'Mixantik and his 'Connections' with Christies'

     Vignette: Mixantik papyrus fragment, ended up in Green Collection

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    9780198806646.jpg

    Isabella Image, The Human Condition in Hilary of Poitiers. The Will and Original Sin between Origen and Augustine, Oxford-New York, 2017.

    Éditeur : Oxford University Press
    256 pages
    ISBN : 9780198806646
    65 £

     

    While he is more commonly known for his Trinitiarian works and theology, this study assesses mid-fourth-century bishop Hilary of Poitiers' view of the human condition. Isabella Image shows that the Commentary on Psalm 118 is more closely related to Origen's than previously thought. Image explains how his articulations of sin, body and soul, the Fall and the will all parallel or echo Origen's views in this work, but not necessarily in his Matthew Commentary. Hilary has a doctrine of original sin ('sins of our origin', peccata originis), which differs from the individual personal sins and for which we are individually accountable. He also articulates a fallen will which is in thrall to disobedience and needs God's help, something God always gives as long as we show the initiative. Hilary's idea of the fallen will may have developed in tangent with Origen's thought, which uses Stoic ideas on the process of human action in order to articulate the constraints on purely rational responses. Hilary in turn influences Augustine, who writes against the Pelagian bishop Julian of Eclanum citing Hilary as an example of an earlier writer with original sin. Since Hilary is known to have used Origen's work, and Augustine is known to have used Hilary's, Hilary appears to be one of the stepping-stones between these two great giants of the early church as the doctrines of original sin and the fallen will developed.
    The Human Condition in Hilary of Poitiers not only identifies Hilary's anthropological thought, but also places it in the current of theological development of the fourth century. It considers reception of Origen in the mid-fourth century, before the criticisms of Epiphanius and the debates in the Egyptian monastic communities. This work also contributes to understanding of the tradition from which Augustine received his doctrine of original sin.

    Lire la suite...


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    The Center for the Study of Christian Origins shared the above video featuring Amy-Jill Levine talking about the parables of Jesus.

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  • 10/22/17--03:07: Whales during the Flood
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/OKfjlqVS6c4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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  • 10/22/17--03:09: The Harbour of Theodosius

  • The Harbour of Eleutherios (Greek: λιμήν Ἐλευθερίου), later known as the Harbour of Theodosius (Greek: λιμήν Θεοδοσίου, Latin: Portus Theodosiacus) was one of the ports of ancient Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, located beneath the modern Yenikapi neighbourhood of Istanbul, Turkey.
    The harbour was located on the south side of the peninsula where the city is built, facing towards the Sea of Marmara. The other harbours of the city were the Harbour of Julian and the small harbour of the Boukoleon Palace, likewise on the southern shore, and the harbours of Neorion and Prosphorion on the northern side. The harbour was built in the late 4th century during the reign of Theodosius I, and was the city's major point of trade in Late Antiquity. The area was later transformed for agricultural use due to the effects of erosion and silting. In Ottoman times, the area was built over.

    Here is a video about the harbour:

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/Lg5XobTOnUE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/cMfy-8vyO3g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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  • 10/22/17--03:42: Aramaic "Pseudo-Daniel"
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/86EXgCM8uFI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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  • 10/22/17--04:14: Looting in Syria

  • Two interesting observations from Christopher Jones
    11 godz.11 godzin temu
    W odpowiedzi do
    In 2014-2015, people dug a crazy amount of holes in Syrian archaeological sites. But two finds account for 80% of revenue in Abu Sayyaf docs
    The recent spate of looting (or Museums and sites) in Syria in fact began in 2012 at the latest (Apamea and the mosaics appearing in Lebanon for example), but there does seem to have been an increase in 2014. If it is true that there was a downswing after 2015, it is interesting to consider why that might have been.

    As for the second issue, readers will know that I am more inclined to see the 'Abu Sayyaf documents' as forgeries created by the US government as a cover for their promotion of an  'ISIL-financed-by-antiquities-looting' story for which there was little other evidence. 

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    Op woensdag 25 oktober organiseert NKV-Antwerpen de lezing ‘Goden, tempels en graven in onze streken in de Romeinse tijd’. Gastspreker is Guido Cuyt, erevoorzitter van de Antwerpse Vereniging voor Romeinse Archeologie.

    De voordracht bevat drie luiken : de heiligdommen, de culten en de grafrituelen. In de officieel door Rome gestichte steden (coloniae), zoals Keulen, Xanten, enz. vinden we architectuur die niet moet onderdoen voor de hoofdstad. Anders is het gesteld op het platteland. De overwegende tempeltypes zijn daar het fanum (Kontich, Grobbendonk,…) en het landelijk openluchtheiligdom (Wijnegem).

    Welke godheden werden er vereerd ? Behandeld worden de officiële Romeinse goden, de keizercultus (Tongeren), de inheemse goden, de mysterieculten (Mithras in Tienen) en het christendom (Tongeren). Opmerkelijk is de tolerantie vanwege de Romeinse overheid ten opzichte van de inheemse godsdienst. Hoe werden de doden begraven ? Er dient onderscheid gemaakt tussen de urngraven en – vooral in het Scheldebekken – de brandrestengraven. Soms is er sprake van heuse grafmonumenten zoals tumuli (voornamelijk in Haspengouw) en grafpijlers (o.a. in Waasmunster).

    De lezing vindt plaats om 20u op de UA–Stadscampus, auditorium R-004, Rodestraat 14, 2000 Antwerpen.


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    De Streekvereniging Zuidrand heeft momenteel een viertal interessante vacatures. Men is onder meer op zoek naar een medewerker onroerend erfgoed, een medewerker cultureel en bouwkundig erfgoed en een coördinator (m/v). De projectvereniging, die actief is in de gemeenten Aartselaar, Borsbeek, Edegem, Hove, Kontich, Lint en Mortsel, werd eerder dit jaar erkend als IOED.

    Je vindt de lopende vacatures op kontich.be.


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    Er wordt wel eens geopperd dat de onderzoekers die in Vlaanderen de Malta-archeologie verzorgen behoefte hebben aan meer inhoudelijke omkadering voor hun bedrijf. De verwachting is dat de vaak disparate resultaten van hun preventief archeologisch onderzoek uitgewerkt worden tot op een niveau dat men ‘academisch’ zou kunnen noemen. Maar daarvoor ontbreken veelal de tijd, de middelen en dus ook het wetenschappelijk kader. Voor dit laatste kijkt men met gefronste wenkbrauwen naar de overheid. Nochtans wordt er daar en elders in Vlaanderen wel aan synthese-onderzoek gedaan, wat helpt om de scherven van het Malta-onderzoek tot een mooie, interpretatieve pot te lijmen. Maar bereikt dit soort onderzoek dan ook de mensen in de werkput? Het antwoord is helaas niet zo positief. Daarom valt een recent initiatief van de uitgeverij Elsevier toe te juichen, dat maakt dat pas verschenen wetenschappelijke artikels voor een korte tijd gratis voor iedereen beschikbaar zijn.

    Publicaties in vaktijdschriften zijn inderdaad doorgaans niet kosteloos toegankelijk en je moet al in het ‘circuit’ zitten om hun verschijnen tijdig te vernemen. Maar voor wie wil weten wat de vraagstelling is bij het inzamelen van dierenbotten in middeleeuwse en latere stedelijke sites, kan dit geen excuus meer zijn. Die surft nu als de bliksem naar elsevier.com en verneemt daar hoe bijna honderd Vlaamse en Brusselse vondstensembles zich aaneen breien tot één verhaal. Na 8 december van dit jaar kan er alleen maar spijt zijn bij wie deze goede raad niet heeft opgevolgd.


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    Every year in Poland one or two metal detectorists are killed trying to dismantle unexploded ordnance instead of calling the sappers (who'll just blow up the item, making it uncollectable). Two military artefact collectors have died this weekend after putting an unexploded bomb on fire to warm it before disassembly and it blew up... ('Fani militariów wrzucili niewybuch do ogniska. Zmarł drugi z poszkodowanych' 22.10.2017). The incident happened in Wola Górzańska (podkarpackie voivodship). A 44-year old man died at once, his metal detecting pal (aged 42, from Bydgoszcz) died in hospital this morning. They had found the object in the forest near the older man's home and took it back to the house and threw it in a fire 30m from the building. During a search of the dead men's homes, police found a number of artefacts coming from the Second World War, military equipment (dogtags, water canisters, helmets and bagnets), but also elements of weapons (shell cases and ammunition). Some of the latter were assessed as potentially being in a dangerous state and were taken away by sappers. Collecting such material is currently illegal in Poland.

     


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    The "army of builders" of Stonehenge ate animals brought from as far away as the north east of Scotland, according to a new exhibition at the famous Neolithic site in Wiltshire.

    Analysis of pig and cattle teeth has revealed some of the animals were from as far as 500 miles away.
    The "Feast! Food at Stonehenge" exhibition includes the skull of an aurochs, an extinct species of cattle. It is aimed at allowing visitors to explore diet from 4,500 years ago.

    Raising the ancient stones was an incredible feat but so too was feeding the army of builders.
    "Our exhibition reveals just how this was done. The displays reveal research and stories from a "feeding Stonehenge" project, which has been exploring the lives of the people who lived at the nearby settlement of Durrington Walls.

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    By Anne W. Semmes

    Sentinel Correspondent

    Archaeologist Dr. Eric Cline before his talk at the Bryam Shubert Library, shows his new book, “Three Stones Make a Wall,” that gives the history of archaeology from an amateur pursuit to its cutting-edge science with descriptions of the major archaeological sites and discoveries.

    Some 40 attendees on Sept. 16 were made privy to the probable causes of how civilization collapsed in history’s “first Dark age,” in the 12th century BCE as shared by Dr. Eric Cline, professor of classics and anthropology at George Washington University, and author of, “1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed.” That collapse told Cline had some startling examples of causes that are present with us now.

    Cline has spent 30 seasons excavating often in the areas of the nine civilizations he focused on in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean. A slide showed the connectedness of those civilizations, including Egyptians, Babylonians, Minoans, and Assyrians, with the caption, “Here, we are considering a globalized world system with multiple civilizations all interacting and at least partially dependent upon each other.”

    Then came the perfect storm: the onslaught of the “Sea Peoples”- warrior groups overrunning countries and kingdoms by land and sea, then drought, famine, invaders, and earthquakes that brought down those civilizations 3,500 years ago in the late bronze age.

    He pointed to how the 300-year drought’s effect on the Myceneans was similar to the havoc brought on in Syria with a four-year drought that began in 2006. With drought came famine, and with earthquakes, said Cline, “Sites were destroyed — and skeletons found under fallen doorways in Mycenae.”

    These events had brought important trade to a standstill between the civilizations, “from Egypt to Crete to Messina.” How rich that trade was Cline described in the famous Uluburun sunken ship excavated off the coast of Turkey. “Eight different cultures were found…10 tons of copper that would have furnished 300 soldiers…Ingots of cobalt blue raw glass.”

    Cline sees the same global connectedness today.“There are only a few instances in history of such globalized world systems; the one in place during the Late Bronze Age and the one in place today,” Cline said.

    He sees also the same problems, and “drought is at the top of the list.” “Studying this collapse is more relevant than you first suspect.” Cline’s warnings as spelled out in his book are apparently hitting a nerve – his lecture on the subject of his book given a year ago has been viewed on YouTube close to a million times.

    Professor Kathy Schwab of Fairfield University had earlier given an equally unsettling while informative talk on the new reality of her subject, “Color in Ancient Greek Sculpture.” “We’re going to talk about pigments used on ancient sculpture,” she eased into her talk with a slide of the brilliant colors sourced from Malachite, Golden Ocher, Azurite, Red Ocher, Cinnabar, and Hematite.

    For those who equate classical antiquity with white marble, imagine seeing the Parthenon in technicolor. Schwab, who spends her research seasons in Athens, Greece, described her plan for drawn color reconstructions of the Parthenon Metopes (her specialty) — though there’s a question of what color goes where.

    “You see here,” she said, “how every surface is colored, even the skin, with yellow, ochre, and red mixed in.” Schwab whose expertise includes ancient Greek hairstyles, shared that “Acropolis maiden’s hairstyles have a residue of red, then brown. Painters created lights and darks in the hair, and even eyelids were painted.

    “In ancient Egyptian art, color showed gender. Reddish for men, a light buff yellow to white for females. Bronze Age tattoos had color. A Mycenean sphinx had tattooed rosettes and tattoos.” In a recent news story Schwab spied a Syrian woman refugee with tattoos on her face similar to those used in 1,300 BCE. “There is a longevity of these traditions,” she noted.

    And yet, “There is no evidence of paint on bronze,” she said, “only paint on marble. Paint protects the art – just like our house. Marble is protected by paint.”

    “Bringing color in creates a different narrative,” Schwab concluded, and, “More and more museums are trying to find ways for visitors to understand this.” She pointed to the efforts of German archaeologist Vinzenz Brinkman to change that narrative with his extensive color reconstructions of Greek and Roman statuary that have toured the world. Time Magazine had addressed the public response with, “The exhibition forces you to look at ancient sculpture in a totally new way.”











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    Xun (ceramic vessel flute)

    Ancient China,  206 B.C.–220 A.D.

    Overall: W. 7 cm x D. 4.8cm x L. 10.5cm (2 13/16 x 1 7/8 x 4 1/8in.)

    Simple globular clay whistles, or ocarinas, were among the earliest wind instruments that required an understanding of how pitch is determined by the relationship between the dimensions of the wind chamber and the placement of the finger holes. Ancient versions have finger holes on one side of the ovoid body; later versions, still used in Sino-derived Korean ritual music, have holes located at the cardinal points around the onion-shaped instrument.

    Source: Met Museum


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    Isaenko O.V. et S. K. Sukhoruchenko (2017) : Три новых клада римских монет из Крыма. К вопросу об обращении римской монеты в Таврике в I -II вв. н.э. / Tri novykh klada rimskikh monet iz Kryma. K voprosu ob obrashhenii rimskoj … Lire la suite

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    Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

    HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem decimum Kalendas Novembres.

    MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Danaids, and there are more images here.



    TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

    TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Grata brevitas (English: Brevity is welcome).

    PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Sero in periclis est consilium quaerere (English: It is too late to seek advice in the midst of dangers).

    PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Atlas caelum (English: Atlas holds up the sky; from Adagia 1.1.67). Here is a Greek-Latin gif:


    ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit: No man in the world is wise at al houres. It is only belonging to God and properly due unto him never to commit follie. There is, I say, no man, but otherwiles doteth, but is deceived, but plaieth the foole, though he seme never so wise. Whan I say man, I except not the woman.

    BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ad Torquatulum. Click here for a full-sized view.


    And here are today's proverbial LOLcats... and for another "Fiat Lux," see the LOLBaby below:



    Fiat lux!
    Let there be light!

    Altius tendo.
    I strive to go higher.

    Latin LOLBaby: Enzo is really looking grown up! Learn more at the blog.