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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia
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    [First posted in AWOL 29 September 20 2017, updated 14 October 2018]

    Ad Familiares – Classics for All’s online journal

    Image result for Classics for All
    Welcome to Ad Familiares, our exclusive online journal. We will be publishing one article a month of current classical interest, commissioned by James Morwood (Wadham College, Oxford). We plan to add a new article every month. If any member of Classics for all would like to contribute a piece, could he or she please contact the editor at james.morwood at classics.ox.ac.uk.


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    Pro-tips for surviving without alcohol in a barren land from Cyrus the Great.

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    The second episode of this season of Doctor Who made very clear that we’re in the same universe with the same Doctor, regenerated. There were a lot of references to the classic series, from the opening credits to the very end. Sure, it featured a space race that the Doctor found herself and her companions inadvertently in […]

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    Il s’agit, en partant des différentes situations embrassées par la notion de « dialogue » en Grèce et à Rome (modalité discursive, figure du discours produisant un effet, genre littéraire construit à partir de dispositifs de représentation complexes), de s’intéresser plus particulièrement à la distinction entre dialogue et dialogisme. Le corpus envisagé est à la fois celui de la pratique et de la théorie rhétoriques (discours, déclamations, traités) et celui des genres philosophiques qui privilégient le dialogisme (dialogues, lettres, diatribes). La mise en parallèle de ces deux corpus cherche à interroger les phénomènes d'influences réciproques; ainsi entre par exemple les figures rhétoriques du dialogisme et le genre philosophique du dialogue.

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    pugna publica (f. pl. pugnae publicae)

    Open battle. Veg., DRM 3.17. [Cowan 2007]


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    quaestionarius (m. pl. quaestionarii)

    An interrogator. CIL II 4156; VIII, 2751. [Goldsworthy 2003]


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    quaestor (m. pl. quaestores)

    Officer in charge of provisioning, paying, and recruiting an army in the Republican period. Livy 26.47.8; 40.41.8. [Goldsworthy 2003]


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    le-mythe-de-lart-antique.png

    Emmanuelle Hénin et Valérie Naas, Le Mythe de l'art antique, Paris, 2018.

    Éditeur : CNRS éditions
    488 pages
    ISBN : 978-2-271-09020-1
    25 €

    De la peinture antique, qui fut certainement d'une grande richesse, nous ne conservons que de rares traces matérielles. Mais ces chefs-d'oeuvre disparus ont subsisté à travers des textes qui les décrivent et nous racontent, à leur propos, des anecdotes, mythes et récits que la tradition a fini par transformer en lieux communs : l'artiste tombant amoureux de son modèle, le jeune homme préférant la statue à la femme de chair, le peintre se livrant à la torture pour mieux représenter la douleur, des raisins si parfaitement imités que les oiseaux viennent les picorer.
    C'est par la médiation de ces discours et de ces narrations que l'art antique a irrigué tout l'art occidental, dans sa pratique comme dans sa conception. Sans cesse repensés et reformulés, ces récits fondateurs ont offert à chaque auteur l'occasion d'exprimer sa vision singulière et se sont finalement traduits par autant d'interprétations originales.

    Lire la suite...


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    Review of Carl A. Shaw, Euripides: Cyclops. A satyr play. Companions to Greek and Roman tragedy. London; New York: 2018. Pp. xiv, 158. $114.00. ISBN 9781474245791.

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    Review of Agnieszka Wojciechowska, From Amyrtaeus to Ptolemy. Egypt in the Fourth century B.C. Philippika 97. Wiesbaden: 2016. Pp. 172. €48.00. ISBN 9783447106559.

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    Review of Denis Michael Searby, Never the Twain Shall Meet? Latins and Greeks Learning from Each Other in Byzantium. Byzantinisches Archiv. Series Philosophica, 2. Berlin; Boston: 2018. Pp. xi, 358. €99,95. ISBN 9783110559583.

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    October 21, 2018 - 11:44 AM - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

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  • 10/15/18--01:54: A punic winepress in Spain
  • <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/pP9PevghJGk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    The illegal excavation and trade of cultural objects from Syrian archaeological sites worsened markedly after the outbreak of civil disturbance and conflict in 2011. Since then, the damage to archaeological heritage has been well documented, and the issue of terrorist funding explored, but hardly any research has been conducted into the organization and operation of theft and trafficking of cultural objects inside Syria. As a first step in that direction, this paper presents texts of interviews with seven people resident in Syria who have first-hand knowledge of the trade, and uses information they provided to suggest a model of socioeconomic organization of the Syrian war economy regarding the trafficking of cultural objects. It highlights the importance of coins and other small objects for trade, and concludes by considering what lessons might be drawn from this model to improve presently established public policy


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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/O6T-jTXiz2w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years, reports a University of Arizona-led international team. By studying the annual rings of black pines (Pinus nigra) such as these, scientists figured out that the northern boundary of the tropics moved back and forth in the last 800 years. The people at the top of the ridge are dendrochronologists  from...

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    Aan de Tommenmolen in Grimbergen werd dit weekend het boek ‘Bouwen om te bakken. Bouw, gebruik en restauratie van bakovens’ voorgesteld. Het boek is een initiatief van de provincie Vlaams-Brabant, Monumentenwacht en het MOT.

    De warmte en gezelligheid van een opgestookte bakoven brengt mensen weer samen. Niets zo gezellig als samen met vrienden of familie brood of pizza’s te bakken. Maar hoe begin je eraan? ‘Bouwen om te bakken’ is een gedetailleerd stappenplan voor het gebruik en de bouw van bakovens volgens de manier van onze voorouders. Maar de aloude technieken zijn in een modern jasje gestoken. Hedendaagse ovenbouwers geven in het boek hun geheimen prijs.

    Daarnaast telt Vlaanderen ook nog duizenden oude bakovens, die de voorbije jaren door het MOT werden samengebracht in een inventaris. De ovens zijn getuigen van een verleden waarin ieder gezin zijn eigen brood bakte. In ‘Bouwen om te bakken’ kom je alles te weten over hoe je zo’n vervallen bakoven weer tot leven wekt.

    Met 500 foto’s op 256 pagina’s is ‘Bouwen om te bakken’ ook een aantrekkelijk kijkboek. Het boek is vanaf 17 oktober verkrijgbaar in alle filialen van Standaard Boekhandel of kan besteld worden via www.vlaamsbrabant.be/bakovens.

    Op zaterdag 20 oktober organiseert het Regionaal Landschap Zuid-Hageland een ‘Ronde van de bakovens’. Op verschillende plaatsen in de regio gooien eigenaars van een bakoven hun deuren open. Meer informatie vind je op www.rlzh.be.


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    Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils. An underwater picture of the modern demosponge species Rhabdastrella globostellata, which make the same 26-mes steroids that the researchers found in ancient rocks [Credit: Paco Cárdenas]The study, led by Gordon Love, a professor in...

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    Over on Ancient Jew Review, I have a review of Donna Zuckerberg’s new book, Not All Dead White Men.  The review was certainly not easy to write, but I do recommend buying, reading, and then sharing this important read. It is honestly the only time in the past two years or so that I have been happy to see the Apollo of the Belvedere used in a modern context.

    Screen Shot 2018-10-15 at 6.46.33 AM


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    Studia Hercynia: Journal of the Institute of Classical Archaeology
    ISSN: 1212-5865 (print)
    ISSN: 2336-8144 (online)

    Studia Hercynia is a biannual peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the study of the material culture of Antiquity, on relations between the Mediterranean and Central Europe, on the traditions of ancient art in European culture, and other related phenomena. The journal aims to advance Classical Archaeology and associated disciplines, both in the Czech Republic and internationally.
    The journal was founded in 1997 by Prof. Jan Bouzek under the Institute of Classical Archaeology, Faculty of Arts, at the Charles University.

    Since 2015 Studia Hercynia is an Open Access journal with online content freely available to the readers under the CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license. Full articles are available on the internet to all readers immediately upon publication and their further non-commercial use and distribution in any medium is permitted, provided the author and the journal are properly credited.
    No fees are charged for the manuscript submission, processing, and publication.
    I. Peer‑reviewed studies
    „The Ionians at War?“ Die Waffenweihungen in den ionischen Heiligtümern und das Apollon‑Heiligtum von Didyma(Marek Verčík), p. 7-26

    Thirty Years of Interdisciplinary Research at the Site of Pistiros(Lenka Parvoničová – Jan Bouzek), p. 27-39

    One Authority – One Idea – One Order. The Monetary System of the Amber Road as a Testimony of Greek Influence on Social and Economic Activities of Central European Celts(Tomáš Smělý), p. 40-80

    On the Production and Distribution of the Ceramic Building Material in Vindobona(Tomáš Janek), p. 81-96

    II. Reports
    Yurta‑Stroyno Archaeological Project. Preliminary Report to the Final Season of 2016(Petra Tušlová – Barbora Weissová – Stefan Bakardzhiev), p. 99-112

    Metal and Glass Small Finds from Yurta‑Stroyno, Season 2016: Selected Finds(Viktoria Čisťakova), p. 113-120

    Archaeological Survey in the Eastern Kugitang Piedmonts (South Uzbekistan), Preliminary Report for Seasons 2016 and 2017(Ladislav Stančo – Shapulat Shaydullaev – Alisher Shaydullaev – Anna Augustinová – Jakub Havlík – Petra Cejnarová), p. 121-138

    Archaeological Survey in the Oases of Maydon and Goz in the Piedmont of the Kugitang Mountains (South Uzbekistan) – Preliminary Report for Season 2017(Anna Augustinová – Ladislav Stančo – Ladislav Damašek – Odiljon Khamidov – Tobiáš Kolmačka – Shapulat Shaydullaev), p. 139-159

    Kurgans of the Eastern Kugitang Piedmonts: Preliminary Report for Season 2017(Jakub Havlík – Ladislav Stančo – Hana Havlíková), p. 160-182



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    This is a big week for The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota. The first in a pair of fall releases happens tomorrow with another on schedule for mid-November. My colleague David Pettegrew and I are also wrapping up page proofs from our Oxford Handbook project.

    Because I’ve been thinking about publishing and digital publishing a good bit lately. As I’ve noted before, the work of thinking about how a book is designed, laying out a book, and reviewing proofs, provides ample opportunities to think about how books and publishing work on a practical level.

    Lately, I’ve thought about three things:

    1. Collaboration. One of the great things about The Digital Press is that I’ve had the opportunity to work closely with some many good people. It is remarkable to me that so many scholars want a more hands-on involvement in the publishing process. The scholar with whom my press has worked are interested in fonts, margins, cover pages, and layouts. More than that, they’re interested in contributing actively to the process of moving a work from an idea, to a document in a word processor to a set of page proofs and to a finished book. 

    The willingness and interest in the process of publishing suggests that there is a growing realization that publishing isn’t just what happens to a finished work when the hard work of thinking and writing is done, but extends through the process of designing, presenting, and even marketing the work. The collaborative spirit of the press serves the break down the barrier between author and publisher and not only give authors greater control over their work, but also challenges the idea of publishing as a commercial enterprise that acquires the rights of an author’s work in exchange for the work and risk associated with producing a published object. While I believe that commercial, academic, small, and large publishers should always exist for there to be a healthy publishing ecosystem, readers of this blog know that I’m also committed to models and modes of publishing that hybridize and complicate the current system. 

    2. The Digital Page. Over the past year, I’ve thought a good bit about what the digital page looks like. On the one hand, the web page, coded in HTML and laced with hyperlinks, has a long tradition of standing as quintessential digital page. On the other hand, the development of the codex page in the analog book is deeply embedded in our intellectual and cultural world. From our system of academic citation to the prevailing metaphor of the “page” as a tool to present information, the page remains a useful way to think about how we communicate knowledge.

    Of course, the digital page has its challenges. My preference remains to use the PDF as the basic way to publish new knowledge. The PDF is not the most elegant or dynamic platform, but it shares the basic structure with paper books and represents the kind of hybrid digital/analog space that allows readers to move seamlessly from digital to print media. This does, however, involve certain sacrifices. For example, the digital page does not like columns or densely spaced text blocks. In my experience, narrower text blocks with generous margins and line spacing work better on screen and across devices. Not all fonts move between the analog and digital with equal grace.

    The downside of these compromises is that sometimes the analog page looks a bit simple and brash in order to make the digital page feel comfortable and easy to read.

    3. Thinking about Digital Publishing in Archaeology. I’m pretty excited to have been invited to the 2019, Institute for European and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Buffalo next spring. The topic is Critical Archaeology in the Digital Age and I’ll present a paper titled “Collaborative Digital Publishing in Archaeology: Data, Workflows, and Books in the Age of Logistics.”

    I’m not entirely sure what this paper will be about, but my hope is that it extends from the paper that I’ve been toiling on for the European Journal of Archaeology which is playing with post-industrial metaphors in digital archaeological practice. I hope that this can be effectively extended to how we think about the book as the goal of the archaeological workflow and how changes in digital practices has complicated any implicit linearity to the course of archaeological work.


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    The earliest evidence of alcohol production has been discovered in the Rakefet Cave in Mount Carmel. Probably a kind of beer made from fermented grains, the brew was produced by the Natufians who lived in the region at that time.

    The Epipaleolithic Natufian culture existed from around 13,050 to 7,550 BCE in the Levant, and was unusual in that it supported a sedentary or semi-sedentary population before the introduction of agriculture. Natufian communities may be the ancestors of the builders of the first Neolithic settlements in the region, which may have been the earliest in the world.

    Natufians are believed to have founded Jericho, considered by many to be the oldest city in the world. Some evidence suggests Natufian cultivation of cereals at Tell Abu Hureyra in what is now northern Syria - site of earliest evidence of agriculture in the world. The world's oldest evidence of bread-making has been found at Shubayqa, a 14,500 year old site in Jordan's northeastern desert.

    Excavation leader Professor Danny Nadel of the University of Haifa: "The Rakefet Cave does not stop offering new discoveries about the wonderful Natufian culture. We have already discovered that they buried their dead and that they lined the graves with a bed of flowers. We discovered their technological capabilities through a variety of tools and now we find that they produced beer and consumed it, apparently at special ceremonies."

    Another finding at the Rakefet Cave site were dozens of craters carved several centimeters deep in the rock. One test revealed evidence of several different grains stored in the same craters, including wheat, barley, oatmeal, legumes, and flax. Other tests showed remains of starch grains that underwent changes corresponding to fermentation, craters used to store grains before and after fermentation, and for crushing and grinding of grains. Remnants of fibers found at the bottom of the craters indicates grains were stored in woven baskets.

    Edited from Jewishpress.com (13 September 2018)
    http://tinyurl.com/ybsqr7rd
    [4 images, 1 drawing, 1 map]

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    Titre: Le problème des révisions d'auteurs dans la tradition des textes historiques et littéraires
    Lieu: Maison de l'archéologie - Univ. Bordeaux Montaigne / Pessac
    Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
    Date: 17.10.2018
    Heure: 18.00 h
    Description:

    Information signalée par Guillaume Flamerie de Lachapelle

    Le problème des révisions d'auteurs dans la tradition des textes historiques et littéraires

     

    Le séminaire a lieu en salle Pierre-Paris. Il débute à 18 heures.

    Lieu de la manifestation : Pessac - Université Bordeaux Montaigne - Maison de l'archéologie
    Organisation : Valérie Fromentin
    Contact : valerie.fromentin[at]u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr


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    A jade ax from the Italian Alps and three drums carved out of Yorkshire chalk are among artifacts that have been brought together for an exhibition at Stonehenge and tell the story of a prehistoric version of Brexit. The exhibition, Making Connections: Stonehenge in its Prehistoric World, explains the movement of people between the British Isles and continental Europe.

    Before Stonehenge appeared, the exhibition shows, Britain and Ireland had close connections with their continental neighbors as the earliest farmers migrated to and from mainland Europe: hence the appearance of the highly polished jade ax from the Alps, which arrived in Britain in about 4000 BC.

    However, during the era when Stonehenge was being built and used – the stones arrived in about 2500 BC and the structure was complete by 2000 BC or thereabouts – there was an apparent hiatus in cross-Channel cultural exchange.

    Later, by the early bronze age, mass migration between the continent and the British Isles had begun again and objects shown in the exhibition, such as the Blessington lunula, a spectacular golden collar found in Ireland but with European markings, were being created.

    Susan Greaney, an English Heritage historian, said the exhibition illustrated a constantly changing ebb and flow of people, objects, styles and ideas. “Our ancestors have been making and breaking relationships with continental Europe for thousands of years,” she said. The central question that cannot be answered is what brought about the hiatus at the time of Stonehenge’s construction. “We don’t know why,” said Greaney. “It seems the British Isles and mainland Europe diverged. It may be there are different languages, different religious beliefs.”

    The idea of the exhibition was to bring objects from the British Museum in London to Stonehenge – the first time this has been done – to help to place the Wiltshire site in this ancient, shifting European context. It is not trying to make any political statements about current relations between the UK and Europe.

    One of the standout objects is the jade ax, which was not a practical object but is believed to have ceremonial or symbolic significance and shows close links between continental Europe and the British isles in the pre-Stonehenge days. Another stunning exhibit is the Folkton drums, three elaborately carved chalk cylinders found in the grave of a child in North Yorkshire. They probably date to the late Neolithic period as the geometric and spiral decoration and stylized faces are seen on grooved ware pottery and megalithic monuments of this period. They are in the exhibition to represent the hiatus when what is now the UK and Ireland appeared to become more insular. People were travelling all around the British Isles but if they were venturing to the continent they appeared not to be bringing back objects – or ideas.

    Neil Wilkin, a curator of the bronze age collection at the British Museum, said: “To be able to bring all these objects together for the first time at Stonehenge, one of the most important symbols of ancient Britain, is an exciting prospect.”

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    Archaeologists armed with a motorized high resolution georadar have found a Viking ship and a large number of burial mounds and longhouses in Østfold County in Norway. The outline of the Viking ship can clearly be seen in this animation of the radar data [Credit: Lars Gustavsen, NIKU]The discoveries were made by archaeologists from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) with technology developed by the Ludwig...

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    D-Scribes List - Digital Paleography and Ancient Document Analysis

    D-Scribes List is a non-commercial mailing list aiming to connect people interested in Digital Humanities, especially in the fields of Digital Palaeography (Computerized Classification, letter/sign shape comparison), Writer Identification and Ancient Document Analysis (layout, alignment, shape of the fragments, annotating tools). Its creation takes place in the four years SNSF Ambizione project in Basel University: "Reuniting fragments, identifying scribes and characterizing scripts: the Digital paleography of Greek and Coptic papyri".

    To see the collection of prior postings to the list, visit the Mailinglist Archives.

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    An exquisitely preserved skeleton of a woman dubbed the “Grand Lady” has been discovered...

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    Some 3,500 years ago, there was already a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea. This conclusion follows from the analysis of 100 fish teeth that were found at various archaeological sites in what is now Israel. The saltwater fish from which these teeth originated is the gilthead sea bream, which is also known as the dorade. It was caught in the Bardawil lagoon on the northern Sinai coast and then...

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  • 10/15/18--09:45: Volunteer Archaeology Lab
  • Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    exhibition
    education
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 13, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm

    Ever wonder what archaeologists do with all that stuff they dig up at archaeological sites once the fieldwork is finished? At the FPAN Volunteer Lab, you can come find out for yourself! Learn all about how artifacts and other archaeological material get processed in the laboratory so that we can use them to learn about the past. You will get the chance to sort through, identify, and wash artifacts and other material from real archaeological sites!
    All ages are welcome to participate or observe, children 12 and under should be accompanied by an adult.

    Location

    Name: 
    Florida Public Archaeology Network
    Telephone: 
    (813)396-2325
    Call for Papers: 
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    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    education
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 13, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

    Historic Spanish Point's Archaeology Lecture Series is back! Head to Spanish Point on Saturday, October 13th from 1:00-3:00 pm for a special presentation from Dr. Kathy Weedman Arthur of University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

    Location

    Name: 
    Historic Spanish Point
    Telephone: 
    (941) 966-5214
    Call for Papers: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Old Saybrook Historical Society
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    exhibition
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 1:00pm

    You are invited to attend a second presentation about the Old Saybrook Historical Society's project on the "Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort and the Pequot War." The program will include 1) a brief review of plans and progress, 2) a short walking tour of nearby Saybrook Fort battle sites, and 3) a discussion regarding listing the siege and battles of Saybrook Fort on the National Register of Historic Places. Presenters include Dr. Kevin McBride, David Naumec, and Dr. Ashley Bissonnette from the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center. 

    Free and open to the public. 

    Location

    Name: 
    OSHS Staff
    Telephone: 
    860-395-1635
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
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    Right Content: 

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  • 10/15/18--09:58: Volunteer Archaeology Lab
  • Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    workshop
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Friday, October 26, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm

    Ever wonder what archaeologists do with all that stuff they dig up at archaeological sites once the fieldwork is finished? At the FPAN Volunteer Lab, you can come find out for yourself! Learn all about how artifacts and other archaeological material get processed in the laboratory so that we can use them to learn about the past. You will get the chance to sort through, identify, and wash artifacts and other material from real archaeological sites!
    All ages are welcome to participate or observe, children 12 and under should be accompanied by an adult.

    Location

    Name: 
    Florida Public Archaeology Network
    Telephone: 
    (813) 396-2325
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Header: 
    Right Content: 

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    A radical new approach combining archaeology, genetics and microscopy can reveal long-forgotten secrets of human diet, sanitation and movement from studying parasites in ancient poo, according to new Oxford University research. Identification and enumeration of helminth eggs in Lübeck deposits reveal a temporal pattern of cestode infections. Micrographs of parasite eggs in archaeological samples from Lübeck (a–d), images of eggs in...

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Institute for American Indian Studies
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 1:00pm

    Join the conversation as Director of Research & Collections, Lucianne Lavin, Ph.D. identifies and provides interesting commentary about your local stone objects and Northeastern Native American cultural items. While we can't appraise or speculate about the value of an object, we can certainly talk about the who, what, when, where, and how of your mystery items! Please limit 12 artifacts per person.

    Free and open to the public. 

    Location

    Name: 
    Lucianne Lavin
    Telephone: 
    860-868-0518
    Right Header: 
    Call for Papers: 
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    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    education
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am

     Just like other artifacts that archaeologists find, plant remains can say a lot about past people’s diet, environment, and culture. Native Peoples in Florida have used various plants as medicine, food, and other important purposes for thousands of years. Learn about some of Florida’s most useful native plants, and how archaeologists study preserved plant remains to find out how people used them in the past. Becky O’Sullivan of the Florida Public Archaeology Network - West Central Region leads this interactive program.

    Location

    Name: 
    Florida Public Archaeology Network
    Telephone: 
    (813)396-2325
    Call for Papers: 
    no
    Right Header: 
    Right Content: 

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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Archaeological Society of South Florida
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 1:00pm

    Location

    Name: 
    ASSF
    Email: 
    Telephone: 
    Call for Papers: 
    no
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    Met de gratis Archeologiedag 2018 op woensdag 21 november in Antwerpen knoopt de dienst Erfgoed van de provincie Antwerpen aan bij de traditie om archeologische onderwerpen op een hoog niveau in de kijker te plaatsen en deze kennis te ontsluiten. Enkele recent opgegraven Merovingische grafvelden en de nakende publicatie van het grafveld van Broechem, het eerste archeologische ‘topstuk’, zijn de directe aanleiding om dit jaar het thema ‘De vroege middeleeuwen. Een donkere periode voor de Antwerpse Kempen?’ centraal te plaatsen.

    Vertrekkend van deze funeraire sites wordt uitgezoomd naar andere aspecten van de vroegmiddeleeuwse samenleving en naar de omliggende regio’s. Onderzoekers belichten het onderwerp in de Antwerpse Kempen, in het aangrenzende Noord-Brabantse gebied en in de zandstreek van Oost- en West-Vlaanderen.

    Het volledige programma en de link om in te schrijven vind je in deze bijlage (pdf). Het aantal plaatsen voor deze gratis studiedag is beperkt. Wees er dus tijdig bij.


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  • 10/15/18--10:19: Life Along the New River
  • Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Southeast Florida Archaeological Society
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 10:30am

    Southeast Florida Archaeological Society

    Life Along the New River

    Presented by

    Micheline Hilpert

    Palm Beach State College, FPAN

    Life Along the

    New

    River

    is a

    celebration of

    Fort Lauderdale

    s rich past, as told through the

    stories of those who lived along the banks of

    the

    New

    River. This talk explains the

    geological

    formation of the

    river

    and then

    explores

    the uses of the

    river

    throughout the centuries.

    Location

    Name: 
    Sara Ayers-Rigsby
    Telephone: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by AIA-Jacksonville Society
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 12:00pm

    Lecture by: Dr. Kenneth E. Sassaman University of Florida

    The material record of coastal living along the northern Gulf Coast of Florida continues to be overcome by the water of rising sea. Encoded in this record are clues to the ways that people and ecosystems responded to sea-level rise over millennia. Since 2009, the Lower Suwannee Archaeological Survey of the University of Florida has been working to salvage vulnerable sites while developing information relevant to future challenges with environmental and social change. 

    Location

    Name: 
    AIA-Jacksonville Society
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  • 10/15/18--10:26: Adams Mill Trail Walk
  • Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Hockanum River Linear Park Committee (HRLPC)
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 1:00pm

    It's Archeology Month! Come explore the trails, dams, and remnants of the former Adams paper mills along the Hockanum River with members of the Hockanum River Linear Park Committee, the Town Historian, and author Dick Symonds. Hilly and bumpy walk along the river with views of sandstone walls, an old hydro-electric operation. About 2 miles; takes about 2 hours, with commentary. Be prepared for wet terrain. Some athletic ability helpful. We will hike if light rain -- bring an umbrella -- but extreme weather cancels. No dogs, please. 

    Free and open to the public.

    Location

    Name: 
    Customer Service Center (Manchester Town Hall)
    Telephone: 
    (860) 647-5235
    Call for Papers: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Time Sifters Archaeology Society
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 6:00pm

     Time Sifters Archaeology Society Lecture Series - The Bronze Age Archaeology of Seyitomer Mound in Turkey by Dr. Laura Harrison

    Location

    Name: 
    Sherry Robinson Svekis
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Tampa Bay History Center
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 10:00am

    Led by noted local historian Fred Hearns, you’ll tour “the Harlem of the South,” Tampa’s Central Avenue district. Learn about life in Tampa’s African-American community, from the 1890s through the late 1960s. This outdoor trek begins at the new Robert Saunders Public Library and explores the social, political, musical and religious traditions of Tampa’s Black life in Tampa.

    Tampa Bay History Center walking tours take place outdoors. Guests will walk approximately one mile. ***Pre-registration is required.

    Location

    Name: 
    Tampa Bay History Center
    Telephone: 
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Fairfield Museum and History Center; National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    fair
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 10:00am

    Celebrate International Archaeology Day with an underground exploration into Fairfield's Town Green just adjacent to the Fairfield Museum and History Center. Explore artifacts, try out a trowel and a metal detector, and learn how to uncover the layers of mysterious history beneath our feet. 

    Location

    Name: 
    Fairfield Museum Staff
    Telephone: 
    (203) 259-1598
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    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by University of Connecticut
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 4:00pm

    Lecture by Dr. John England, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta 

    Location

    Name: 
    Gregory Anderson
    Telephone: 
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    SZCZECIN, POLAND—Archaeologist Grzegorz Kiarszys of the University of Szczecin investigated the sites of three former Soviet nuclear bases in Poland, according to Science in Poland. The concrete-built weapons depots, established in 1969 and in use into the 1990s, were monumentally sized and dug deep into the ground. Kiarszys found that the bases were not well camouflaged, even though rumors through the years suggested they were perfectly hidden from American spy satellites and protected with anti-aircraft guns. “The main elements of the base, including buildings, access roads, helipads, are perfectly visible on satellite images,” he said, “although for a long time the CIA was not sure whether nuclear weapons were actually stored in the photographed facilities.” Kiarszys also created new maps of the sites with aerial laser scanning, which found no evidence of anti-aircraft guns, but did reveal ditches dug around all three of the bases, well-hidden shelters for the cars that were used to transport the warheads, and traces of the patrol paths used by Soviet guards. “It is clear that soldiers tried to avoid effort and avoided hills and elevations,” Kiarszys said. For more on archaeology of the nuclear age, go to “The Secrets of Sabotage.”


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    China Song Model HouseANHUI PROVINCE, CHINA—Live Science reports that a 900-year-old tomb holding the well-preserved remains of a woman dubbed the “Grand Lady” has been discovered in eastern China. Archaeologists from the Nanling County Cultural Relics Administration and the Anhui Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology said the skeletal remains, complete with fingernails and hair, were found in a coffin that had been placed within a second coffin. A banner on the inner coffin described the occupant as a “Grand Lady.” The researchers are still attempting to make out the rest of her name, which may read “née Jian.” Paintings on the inner coffin show her wearing different outfits. The woman’s grave goods include a model house complete with tiny furniture, ten figurines depicting women playing instruments, a silver pendant shaped as two dragons chasing pearls, silver and gold hairpins and bracelets, bronze coins minted between A.D. 713 and 1100, embroidered shoes, and traces of two sticky rice dumplings under her right hand. To read about another burial site in China, go to “Tomb Couture.”


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    Italy child malariaLUGNANO, ITALY—An unusual burial in La Necropoli dei Bambini, a cemetery placed in an abandoned Roman villa that had been thought to have been reserved for the interment of infants and toddlers, contains the remains of a ten-year-old who may have died during a malaria outbreak in the fifth century A.D., according to a report in The Washington Post. Researchers led by David Soren of the University of Arizona say the child had been positioned on his or her side in the tomb, which was fashioned from two large roof tiles propped against a wall. The child had a stone in his or her open mouth, and teeth marks on the stone’s surface indicate it was placed there purposefully. The scientists suggest the stone may have been placed there as a way to incapacitate the child, and keep it from rising from the dead and spreading disease among the living. “I really feel deeply for this community that was dealing with this epidemic when they had no understanding of it,” said bioarchaeologist Jordan Wilson of the University of Arizona. The child’s age also indicates that unexcavated sections of the cemetery may hold the remains of older children. To read about the sixth-century burial of a man in Italy who appears to have worn a prosthetic weapon in place of a missing hand, go to “Late Antique TLC.”