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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia
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    A pattern of small holes cut into the floor of an ancient rock shelter in Azerbaijan shows that one...

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  • 12/10/18--05:44: Writing WARP
  • Over the last few months, I’ve been hiding from a line in a minutes from an early June meeting of the Western Argolid Regional Project: Preliminary Report… “ideally ready for submission by Christmas.” I had volunteered to take the lead in writing it and to marshal the contributions from various other folks on the project including two case studies. Needless to say, this hasn’t happened.

    What makes it worse is that I’ve been thinking a good bit about how archaeologists write and archaeological publishing more broadly. Just this weekend, for example, I re-read Rosemary Joyce’s “Writing historical archaeology” in the Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology (2006). I also read Rachel Opitz’s recent contribution to the Journal of Field Archaeology titled ““Publishing Archaeological Excavations at the Digital Turn” (which I blogged about here), Amara Thortons,  Archaeologists in Print: Publishing for the People (UCL 2018)  (blogged here) and thinking a bit about Ian Hodder’s well-known article from AntiquityWriting Archaeology: Site Reports in Context.” While these works all offer different angles on the archaeological writing and publishing, they did reinforce to me that archaeological writing and publishing are undergoing some pretty significant changes, but that these changes are also situated grounded in the goals of archaeological work. (In fact, I’m going to try to marshal some of my ideas on that in a paper that I’m giving at a conference at the University of Buffalo next year.) 

    At the same time, I spent a few hours wrapping up the layout of volume two of the Epoiesen annual which should appear from The Digital Press before the end of the year. The Epoiesen annual is an interesting challenge because it is publishing a web publication in paper (and PDF form). Instead of thinking of the paper format as a degraded representation of a web version, I’ve tried to think of it as a transmedia opportunity to take something that was originally imagined in one media (i.e. the web) and reproduce in another. While we don’t take many risks in how we present Epoiesen on paper, the potential is certainly there and the very act of translating from one media to the next forces us to think about how entangled ideas and material are and how the paper (or even PDF version) of Epoiesen will offer readers a different experience than the online version.

    Advertisement! You can get the first volume of Epoiesen at the low, low price of $6. SIX DOLLARS. That’s cheaper than a beer in New York City or about half the things on the Starbucks menu. 

    A similar challenge will face my little press as we work on our next major project – a volume in collaboration with ASOR that presents a digital catalogue of votive figurines from Athienou on Cyprus. We will present these artifacts both through a traditional catalogue and high-resolution 3D scans presented both as a 3D PDF and through an online catalogue published by Open Context. It’ll be a big project full of challenges at the intersection of the paper codex and dynamic media.

    While this might not seem immediately relevant to writing a preliminary report for WARP, it will push me a bit think about what kind of information is most appropriate for a print report and what kind of information is better to publish as data later on. 

    IMG 3456

    On top of that, I took a couple nice long walks with the dogs this weekend and those always give me a chance to think about big and small picture stuff. I started to think about the challenge of writing a preliminary report as a problem of definition. When is a project sufficiently complete for a preliminary report to offer provisional, but relatively secure, observations on method and results? On WARP, I get pretty anxious when I think of all the work we have left to do to make sense of our data; at the same time, I know that the artifact and main data collection phase of the project is over. What we have now is going to be the basis of both what we say in the final report and future analysis. Preliminary reports are hard to think about because of their liminal status. Archaeologists like to be authoritative in what they say about their work and analysis, and a preliminary report acknowledges that this is not the final word on the area and its material. 

    Finally, there is a fear of the blank page. Fortunately, WARP has published a good bit already – here and there – so there is a kind of basis of already-written material upon which the preliminary report can draw. At the same time, there is the additional pressure of taking our analysis and presentation to the next level. This means more bibliography, more analysis, and more conclusions. This also means making sure that the voices of everyone on the project (and to be clear, folks will help me with this report!) will have space in the report even when we don’t all agree on how and what our analysis mean.  


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    Between foreign hegemony and expansion to the West: Phoenician society and economy from the 10th until the 5th c.

    This is the live stream of the Phoenicians Workshop presented at the JGU Mainz. More information see https://www.vorderasiatische-archaeologie.uni-mainz.de/phoenicians-workshop-12-12-14-12-2018

    This live stream is available on 12th December at 6:00pm and on 13th December at 9:00am.
    There will be some breaks between the presentations, so please wait until the live stream continues.
    The stream contains two videos, the speaker and the presentation slides, so please watch it on a PC/Mac or in desktop mode on smartphones and tablets.

    If there are some issues during the playback, try to reload this page.

    This page will update once the webcast begins


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    Polish archaeologists have discovered dozens of iron and bronze artefacts including a sword and decorative buckles in a nearly 2000 years old Germanic cemetery, archaeologist Krzysztof Socha from the Kostrzyn Fortress Museum reported to PAP. Credit: Krzysztof Socha/Muzeum Twierdzy KostrzynThe cemetery is located in Gorzów poviat (county), though archaeologists have not revealed the exact location of the newly discovered cemetery to...

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    Several teams of researchers have announced that the skeletal remains of a hominin believed to have...

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    [First posted in AWOL 22 September 2014, updated 10 DEcember 2018]

    Clara Rhodos: Studi e materiali pubblicati a cura dell' Istituto Storico-Archeologico di Rodi

    Στη σειρά Clara Rhodos, που αποτελείται από δέκα τόμους και εκδόθηκε από το 1928 έως το 1941, παρουσιάζονται οι έρευνες και οι ανασκαφές στα Δωδεκάνησα, κυρίως στη Ρόδο, την Κω, τη Χάλκη και τη Νίσυρο, κατά τη διάρκεια της Ιταλοκρατίας. Η σειρά αποτελεί έκδοση του ινστιτούτου FERT, που συστήθηκε από τους Ιταλούς αρχαιολόγους το 1927. Μετά την ενσωμάτωση της Δωδεκανήσου στην Ελλάδα το 1948, οι δικαιοδοσίες του FERT μεταβιβάστηκαν στην Ελληνική Αρχαιολογική Υπηρεσία, και συγκεκριμένα στο Αρχαιολογικό και Ιστορικό Ίδρυμα Ρόδου, το οποίο το 2003 μετονομάστηκε σε Αρχαιολογικό Ινστιτούτο Αιγαιακών Σπουδών.

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    De Lingua Sabina: A Reappraisal of the Sabine Glosses

    Citation
    Burman, A. C.(2018). De Lingua Sabina: A Reappraisal of the Sabine Glosses (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.18502
    Abstract
    This thesis offers a reappraisal of the Sabine glosses through the analysis of thirty-nine words, all glossed explicitly as Sabine in ancient sources ranging from the first century BCE to the sixth century CE. The study of the Sabine glosses found in ancient grammarians and antiquarians goes back to the beginnings of Italic scholarship. Over time, two positions on the Sabine glosses have crystallised: (a) the Sabine glosses are evidence of a personal obsession of the Republican author Varro, in whose work many Sabine glosses survive, and (b) the Sabine glosses are true remnants of a single language of which little or no epigraphic evidence has survived. By using the neogrammarian observation that sound-change is regular and exceptionless, it is possible to ascertain whether or not the Sabine glosses are likely to be from the same language. This thesis finds that the sound-changes undergone by the Sabine glosses show no broad agreement. The developments are characteristic of different languages – Latin, Faliscan and various Sabellic languages – and many changes are mutually exclusive. This consequently throws doubt on the assertion that the Sabine glosses are all taken from one language. Instead, the glosses should be seen as part of a discourse of the relationships between Romans, Sabines and Sabellic-speaking peoples. During the Republic, Sabines were central to Roman myth, historiography and political rhetoric. As the Sabines were a distinct people in the Roman foundation myths, but were largely Romanised in the Republican present, they became a convenient bridge between Rome and the Sabellic-speaking peoples of Central and Southern Italy, to whom Greek and Roman writers ascribed myths tracing origin back to the Sabines. This continued into the Empire, when emperors such as Claudius and Vespasian utilised their (supposed) Sabine heritage to gain ideological capital. In light of this, the phenomenon of Sabine glosses cannot be seen as one man’s interest, but as a means of reflecting on Rome’s relations with Sabellic-speaking Italy.
    Keywords
    antiquarianism, glosses, Italic languages, history of linguistics, Paulus-Festus, Sabine, Sabellic languages, Varro, Verrius Flaccus
    Sponsorship
    AHRC Faculty of Classics, Cambridge
    Identifiers
    Rights
    No Creative Commons licence (All rights reserved)

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    The analysis of the world’s most complete skeleton of an early human ancestor, conducted by a research collaboration involving the University of Liverpool, offers conclusive evidence that human ancestors became efficient upright walkers while they were still substantially tree dwelling animals. Professor Ronald Clarke with Little Foot [Credit: University of Liverpool]The first bones of the 3.67 million old skeleton, specimen StW 573...

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    Archaeology in Jordan (AIJ)

    Archaeology in Jordan (AIJ) is a new, biannual open access (OA) newsletter published online by ACOR aimed at raising scholarly awareness of archaeological and cultural resource management projects being carried out in Jordan and to make this information accessible to a wider audience.
    This ACOR publication, initiated in 2018, provides continuity with the “Archaeology in Jordan” Newsletter edited by ACOR staff and affiliates and published in the American Journal of Archaeology (AJA) by the Archaeological Institute of America between 1991 to 2016. All 22 past editions are now open access through links on our past issues page or through AJA online.
    For further information and queries regarding submissions to Archaeology in Jordan please write to acor@acorjordan.org


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    The Levantine Review: The Journal of Near Eastern and Mediterranean Studies at Boston College
    ISSN: 2164-6678

    The Levantine Review
    The Editorial Board of The Levantine Review invites submissions for its forthcoming issues.  A peer-reviewed electronic journal, The Levantine Review publishes scholarship (in English, French, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Syriac, and Levantine vernaculars) on the history, cultures, religions, politics, and the intellectual, philological, and literary traditions of the contemporary Levant and Near East.   Authors are welcome to contact the editors prior to submitting manuscripts for consideration.




    2012



    Vol 1, No 2 (2012)


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    Monument Vandekerckhove NV is momenteel op zoek naar een projectleider archeologie (m/v). Hij/zij zal instaan voor de planning en organisatie van de archeologische sitesen dit van bestelling tot eindrapportage. Kandidaten beschikken over een masterdiploma archeologie en hebben voldoende terreinervaring om een erkenningsaanvraag te kunnen indienen.  Ze hebben ook ervaring met archeologienota’s, en een goede kennis van de Code van Goede Praktijk. Je vindt de volledige vacature op www.monument.be.


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    December 11, 2018 18.00 - Emmanouel Georgoudakis Philatelic and Postal Museum /Nikos Kouremenos Fondazione per le Scienze Religiose Giovanni XXIII, Bologna

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    Sweden birch bark pitchUPPSALA, SWEDEN—Science Magazine reports that human genetic material has been recovered from 8,000-year-old pieces of birch bark pitch that were unearthed in western Sweden in the 1980s. Birch bark pitch, derived from resin, was heated and chewed to make it pliable, and used as a fastener by hunter-gatherer toolmakers. It also may have just been chewed, like gum. A team led by Natalija Kashuba, who was then a student at the University of Oslo, ground samples from three wads of the hardened resin into powder. They then detected human DNA in all three samples, from three different individuals—two female and one male. Based on the size of the tooth marks and signs of tooth wear evident in the resin, the chewers are all thought to have been between five and 18 years old. The DNA analysis also suggests the chewers were from a group known as Scandinavian hunter-gatherers, who lived in Sweden and Norway. For more on archaeology in Sweden, go to “Hoards of the Vikings.”


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    Turkey Zeugma mosaicGAZIANTEP, TURKEY—BBC News reports that Bowling Green State University has handed over pieces of the “Gypsy Girl” mosaic to Turkey, where they have been put on display in the Zeugma Mosaic Museum with other fragments from a larger artwork. The 2,000-year-old image fragments, which depict a girl’s eyes, nose, hair, and hat, are thought to have been looted from the ancient city of Zeugma and smuggled out of Turkey in the early 1960s. The university purchased the mosaic fragment from an art dealer in 1965. To read in-depth about excavations at Zeugma and the mosaics found there, go to “Zeugma After the Flood.”


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    Azerbaijan board gameNEW YORK, NEW YORK—According to a Live Science report, Walter Crist of the American Museum of Natural History has identified a collection of pits carved into a rock shelter in Azerbaijan as a 4,000-year-old game board. Known as “58 Holes,” or “Hounds and Jackals,” copies of the game have also been found in the tomb of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenemhat IV, and at other sites dating to around the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia and Anatolia. This set of pits is located in Gobustan National Park, which is known for its ancient rock art. Scholars think the game was played in a manner similar to backgammon, with counters moved around the board. “It is two rows in the middle and holes that arch around outside,” Crist said of its layout, “and it’s always the fifth, tenth, fifteenth, and twentieth holes that are marked in some way.” A larger hole at the top is thought to be the goal, or endpoint, of the game. To read about an excavation of far more modern games, go to “The Video Game Graveyard.”


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    via decumana (f. pl. viae decumanae)

    Rear road into the fortress, passing through the porta decumana. In the retentura. DMC 18. [Johnson 1983]


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    via praetoria (f. pl. viae praetoriae)

    Main street running between the porta praetoria and the junction with the via principalis, directly in front of the principia. DMC 14. [Johnson 1983]


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    via principalis (f. pl. viae principales)

    Main street running between the porta principalis sinistra and porta principalis dextra. DMC 10. [Johnson 1983]


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    Populations of indigenous people in southern Africa carry a gene that causes lighter skin, and scientists have now identified the rapid evolution of this gene in recent human history. San man of Namibia [Credit: Ian Beatty/WikiCommons]The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from eastern African to southern African populations just 2,000 years ago. Strong positive selection caused this gene to rise in...

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    Archaeologists at the archaeology research institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences have unveiled the details of a deluxe carriage unearthed in a cemetery dating back to the Eastern Zhou Dynasty (770-256 BC) in north China's Hebei Province. Credit: XinhuaAccording to the archaeologists, the carriage is 142.5 cm wide, 106 cm in length and has two wheels with a diameter of 140 centimeters and 38 spokes each. The large volume...

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    Khirki is crowded, with narrow roads and tall buildings bundled together like Lego bricks stacked precariously. Smack in the middle of this chaos is Khirki Mosque, a 14th century fortress-like structure built during the Tughlaq dynasty. The style of writing on the coins indicates that they might be from the Lodi dynasty [Credit: V.V. Krishnan/The Hindu]The mosque is fenced in by high compound walls and the uneven ground is lower than...

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    December 11, 2018 19.00 - LECTURE Dr Zozi Papadopoulou, Head of the Department of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, and Museums of the Ephorate for the Cyclades

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    December 11, 2018 7:00pm - LECTURE Panagiotis Roilos, Harvard University

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    Giovanni Cupaiuolo (dir.), Bollettino di studi latini 48, 2018, fasc. II, Naples, 2018.

    Éditeur : Paolo Loffredo Iniziative editoriali srl, iniziativeditoriali@libero.it
    416 pages
    ISSN : 0006-6583
    Abbonamento due fascicoli: € 72.00 per l'Italia, € 90.00 per l'estero

     

    Lire la suite...


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    Searching history....for the Crown Estate.

    Scandal.


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    Note this is a site under permanent grassland, most likely unploughed in recent times, yet even here some oik has hoiked as many of the diagnostic and other artefacts out that they take a fancy to. And where are they (and any  records they made) now?:
    .
    .
    PeaceHavens published 19 mar 2011
    Metal detector hints. Even in the wilderness I am walking in the footsteps of some detectorist who has been there before me ... but with a bit of lateral thinking I find a new site that they missed ... nothing spectacular ... but new sites are still out there ... but it ain't easy.
    "Someone's had a dig virtually everywhere" (Yorkshire dales 2011). So, in fact, if we were to STOP metal detecting tomorrow and concentrated on getting ll those old dug-up finds and their findspot details documented, we'd still be getting a lot of information about new sites, just the ones that have been dug-over by previous detectorists and not (yet) reported. The Ixelles Six (on pp. 323-34 of their recent joint article) claim that this hoiking on sites like this and the non-reporting of the material and information from them is "not cultural damage" because all that knowledge is not lost, it is just zero-gained, it's not been retrieved from them yet. The FLO says (The Foucault of Baz Thugwit?)  that the 'liminal potential' of these data has yet to be actively utilised through the application of 'the complex of relationships that comprise the 'discursive formation' of Archaeology'. The FLO says that non-recording is not a final denial. Let's see. Time to put those words to the test. Responsible detectorists - all of you - let's get the unreported material on record before any of you dig up and pocket any more!


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     A senior Syrian official says the US and France are carrying out illegal excavations in ancient sites in northern Syria with the help of Kurdish militants (Press TV, ' Official: US, France looting artifacts in northern Syria'', Mon Dec 10, 2018) 
    Much of the digging work is conducted on the Um al-Sarj mountain near Manbij, head of Syria's Directorate-General for Museums and Antiquities Mahmoud Hammoud told SANA news agency Sunday. Manbij is controlled by Kurdish militants who are heavily armed and supported by US and French troops illegally deployed to northern Syria. According to SANA, the Um al-Sarj mountain in the northern countryside of Aleppo is rich in artifacts. US troops and their allies, it said, are carrying out similar excavations in the ancient souk of Manbij. "The excavations, looting and robbery are also taking place in the archaeological tombs in the eastern side of Manbij," he said. Hammoud said the diggings are a criminal act and a violation of the Syrian sovereignty. His department, he said, is contacting international organizations to condemn the looting of Syria's cultural heritage.
    The US has been conducting airstrikes against what it calls Daesh targets inside Syria since September 2014 without any authorization from the Damascus government or a UN mandate.


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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/NswebsPYj3s" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/ZLbs5Zmx3d8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    The new course book on Virgil, Aeneid 11 (Pallas & Camilla) includes Latin text, study aids with vocabulary, and commentary.

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    Review of Matthijs Den Dulk, Between Jews and Heretics: Refiguring Justin Martyr's Dialogue with Trypho. London; New York: 2018. Pp. 174. $140.00. ISBN 9780815373452.

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    Review of Saskia Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety. Mnemosyne. Supplements, 387. Leiden; Boston: 2015. Pp. xiii, 295. $149.00. ISBN 9789004294639.

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    Review of Jean-Yves Empereur, Tony Koželj, Olivier Picard, Manuela Wurch-Koželj, The Hellenistic Harbour of Amathus: Underwater Excavations, 1984-1986. Volume 1, Architecture and History. Études Chypriotes, 19. Paris; Athens: 2018. Pp. 172. €40,00. ISBN 9782869582934.

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    Review of Jean-Marie Olivier, Supplément au Répertoire des bibliothèques et des catalogues de manuscrits grecs (2 vols.). Corpus Christianorum, Series Graeca. Turnhout: 2018. Pp. lxxxiv, 1468. €350,00. ISBN 9782503577180 (1° vol.), 9782503577197 (2° vol.).

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    Musonius Rufus Workshop
    10.00-5.00, 12 April 2019
    Room 102, Senate House,
    University of London,
    Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

    Call for Papers:

    The Roman Stoics have received renewed attention in recent years, both from scholars and from the wider public looking for guidance in everyday life. Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius are now being worked on and read in ways that would have few would have expected a couple of decades ago. Lesser known Stoics such as Hierocles and Cornutus have also benefitted from new studies and translations. The poor relation, though, is Musonius Rufus, who has not yet benefited from a similar resurgence in fortune.

    To address this undeserved oversight, we invite proposals for papers for an informal workshop dedicated to Musonius. We welcome submissions relating to any aspect of his thought; possible themes could include philosophies of gender, adapting Stoicism for a Roman audience, politics and exile, the role of the sage, textual traditions, practice versus theory, methods of moral education, and asceticism, although these suggestions are offered as prompts rather than as limitations.

    We hope that the workshop will offer an opportunity for those with interests in Musonius and Roman Stoicism more widely to come together, make new contacts, and think collectively about further research and publication collaborations.

    We welcome submissions from people at any stage in their career, from doctoral students and early career researchers through to more established academics. We hope to be able to offer bursaries to those who might need financial assistance with travel or caring responsibilities in order to attend. The event will take place on the first floor of the University of London’s Senate House, which has lift access. If anyone has specific access or dietary requirements, please contact us and we will do our best to cater for them.

    Abstracts should be no more than 500 words long. Presentations will be around 30 minutes long, and followed by discussion. The deadline for abstracts is 11th February 2019.

    If you are unable to attend the workshop but would like to be kept informed of future developments, please do get in touch.

    Abstracts and any questions should be sent to the organizers:

    Dr Liz Gloyn (Liz.Gloyn at rhul.ac.uk), Department of Classics, Royal Holloway, University of London
    Dr John Sellars (John.Sellars at rhul.ac.uk), Department of Philosophy, Royal Holloway, University of London


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  • 12/11/18--02:03: Digital Humanities at Work
  • I have been meaning to blog about HumaReC for some time. HumaReC stands for Humanities Research and Continuous Publishing, and represents a Digital Humanities project related specifically to the New Testament, spearheaded by Claire Clivaz, a major figure in this field. But recently, when Ancient World Online drew attention to Sara Schulthess’ Open Access book […]

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/uKDPU1XH5Zo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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    This book 'is the first to encompass the vast history of how living things procreate, from the banks of the ancient Nile to the fertility clinics of today.'

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    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/IN9zr7Db-_4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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  • 12/11/18--04:01: Gift Ideas for 2018
  • Some valuable resources became available this year that I thought I might briefly summarize, either as a gift-buying guide or as additions to your own wish list.

    Let me start with the Lexham Geographic Commentary to the imageGospels. Originally released for Logos Bible Software, it is now available in print. The volume is loaded with 48 essays written by people who have lived and breathed biblical geography and archaeology for many years, including Barry Beitzel (editor), Benjamin Foreman, Gordon Franz, J. Carl Laney, Chris McKinny, Elaine Phillips, A.D. Riddle, and Paul Wright. I wrote two of the essays—one on the disciples’ statement about the “magnificent stones and wonderful buildings” of the Temple and the other on the location of the swine dive in the Sea of Galilee. I think that this book should win an award for its unique contribution. It’s on sale now for $25, including free shipping, plus you get the ebook for free. Or Amazon has the print book alone for $27.

    The ESV Archaeology Study Bible was released earlier this year after many years of research, writing, and production. This up-to-date resource is filled with excellent sidebars and commentary notes. You can see my earlier description here. It’s available now at Amazon for $42.Image result for esv archaeology study bible

    Randall Price and Wayne House wrote the Zondervan Handbook of Biblical Archaeology. I’ve heard that it’s gone through several printings already. I hope to offer a longer review here on the blog in the next few months. My expectation is that it will be very useful to both Bible teachers and students alike.

    The National Geographic Atlas of the Bible was released in June. I haven’t purchased it yet, but the listing tells me that it is 112 pages long and includes 17 maps. One Amazon reviewer says that the text is written from a minimalist perspective.

    The Biblical Archaeology Society store has a sale now, including free shipping on orders of $50 or more. Two new books of most interest to me are A Walk to Caesarea: A Historical-Archaeological Perspective, by Joseph Patrich ($34), and Megiddo-Armageddon: The Story of the Canaanite and Israelite City, by David Ussishkin ($60)

    Filament is a new resource that I saw at a recent conference that combines a print Bible with digital content on your phone or tablet. The printed book has the Bible text only, and the accompanying app provides study notes, photos, and videos.

    Doug Greenwold at Preserving Bible Times has just released a new book on John 4 entitled Jesus Engages a Samaritan Woman. Shipping is free through the end of the year.ruth-dvd-frontback-500

    Finally, I’d encourage you to consider for yourself or others the newest resources created this year by us at BiblePlaces.com. We have a limited audience and every sale helps us to continue forward with the next project. This year we released Ruth and Psalm 23 in the Photo Companion series ($29 and $24, respectively, or $39 for both). We also created a beautiful photo book entitled Psalm 23: A Photo Commentary, available from Amazon for $20. The latest volume of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands is Persia, available for two more days at the introductory price of $25.

    If you shop on Amazon, use the code GIFTBOOK18 to get $5 off a $20 book order through 12/21.


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    Astarté. Estudios del Oriente Próximo y el Mediterráneo

    Page Header
    Astarté es una revista internacional de periodicidad anual, que albergará trabajos inéditos relacionados con temas históricos, lingüísticos, arqueológicos, religiosos y artísticos de los pueblos del Oriente Próximo y de la Cuenca Mediterránea durante la Antigüedad, la Tardo-antigüedad y la Edad Media. Las lenguas de trabajo de la revista son alemán, español, francés, inglés e italiano.

    Num. 1 (2018)

    Tabla de contenidos

    Artículos

    Anas Al Khabour
    1-13
    Amir Ashur, Keren Abbou Hershkovits
    15-25
    Federico Corriente
    27-32
    José Martínez Delgado
    33-62
    Carlos Martínez Carrasco
    63-94
    Juan Pedro Monferrer-Sala
    95-101
    Ramadan Ibrahim Mohamed Mohamed
    103-126
    Gregorio del Olmo Lete
    127-132

    Notas bibliográficas

    Faiad Barbash
    133-136

    Reseñas

    Monferrer-Sala, Juan Pedro, Apocalipsis del Pseudo Atanasio [ApPsAt(ar)II]. Edición, traducción anotada y estudio, col. Barcino–Monographica Orientalia, 4 (Barcelona: Universitat de Barcelona, 2016), 221 pp. ISBN: 978-84-475-3967-3
    Carlos Martínez Carrasco
    137-139
    Greg Fisher (ed.), Arabs and Empires before Islam (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015); pp. xxvii+580. ISBN: 978-0-19-965452-9
    Juan Pedro Monferrer-Sala
    141-143
    Ferrer Albelda, E. – Pereira Delgado, A. (eds.), Profecía y adivinación en las religiones de la Antigüedad. SPAL Monografías XXIV (Sevilla: Editorial Universidad de Sevilla, 2017). pp. 171. ISBN: 978-8-44-721915-5
    Israel Muñoz Gallarte
    145-148
    Van Doorn-Harde, Nelly (ed.), Copts in context. Negotiating Identity, Tradition and Modernity (South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 2017); pp. 283. ISBN: 978-61117-784-8
    Lourdes Bonhome Pulido
    149-152





     


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    Gum won’t really sit in your stomach for years, but it can preserve human DNA for millennia....

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    I really dislike the concept of branding. In particular, I dislike the idea that brands have value and that there is a responsibility to the value inherent in a brand particularly in the humanities. Over the past few years, I’ve been confronted by a number of individuals who view the brand as major part of their responsibility toward public humanities institutions. To my mind, the investment in the brand – whether financial, intellectual, strategic, or emotional – has produced a kind of conservatism.  While I’d never suggest that these individuals valued the brand above content, there is a tendency to use the concept of the brand and its definitions as a way to create barriers to collaboration or even prioritize risk taking because, in the end, social and historical capital that has accumulated around the brand matters.  

    At the same time, as I take on the role of editor of North Dakota Quarterly and sit in an office surrounded by 85 years of the journal and am incredibly aware of the history and legacy of the publication. As we move from being self published to being published by University of Nebraska Press, we have a chance to refresh our cover and interior design. I intentionally asked that we try to evoke some of the design elements during the Quarterly’s heyday under Bob Lewis in the late-1990s and early-21st century. (This is a nice example of it). Despite liking some of our more adventurous approaches to layout – including columns and a volume designed “Tête-bêche” – I got into my head that a more consistent approach might make the journal easier to understand and consume… in other words, ugh, branding.

    Coverfinalgrayspine2

    I also really liked the cover of our recent issue (84.1/2) dedicated to Transnationalism with it’s full width image and was pleased that UNP looked at that cover as a possible template for future NDQs. We need to find a cover image that has the same appeal as Marc-Antoine Frébutte’s “Waiting for the Train,” but I think that’s possible. UNP also played a bit with the NDQ logo while keeping its iconic Davida font. Here’s one example of what they’ve shared:

    NDQ Cover Sample

    Before I knew it, I was thinking about BRANDING and what was important to preserve in NDQ’s identity so that our readers and contributors recognize that despite the changes, we are going to maintain as much of the traditional NDQ identity as possible. I still don’t like branding or the idea of investing in the brand, but I suppose in this case it has a function of reassuring our audience that the core values of the Quarterly will remain intact. 

     

     

     

    I still hate branding, though.


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    Le 11 décembre 2018, Laetitia Graslin-Thomé donnera une conférence intitulée « Recent research on the economy of Hellenistic Babylonia [recherches récentes sur l’économie de la Babylonie hellénistique ] » à l’Université de Freiburg-am-Breisgau (Allemagne) dans le cadre du projet ECR Economic Development, Frontier Zones and Inter-Imperiality in the Afro-Eurasian World Region, 300 BCE to 300 CE. La conférence aura lieu au 22 Bismarckallee (3e étage) de 15h30 à 17h30.

    Illustration : Titre de propriété et exemption du grand prêtre du temple de  Esangila (MET, DP263626 ; CC).


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    Fragmentology: A Journal for the Study of Medieval Manuscript Fragments

    Fragmentology is an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal, dedicated to publishing scholarly articles and reviews concerning medieval manuscript fragments. Fragmentology welcomes submissions, both articles and research notes, on any aspect pertaining to Latin and Greek manuscript fragments in the Middle Ages.
    Founded in 2018 as part of Fragmentarium, an international research project at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the Zeno Karl Schindler Foundation, Fragmentology is owned and published by Codices Electronici AG and controlled by the Editorial Board in service to the scholarly community. Authors of articles, research notes, and reviews published in Fragmentology retain copyright over their works and have agreed to publish them in open access under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Submissions are free, and Fragmentology does not require payment or membership from authors or institutions.

    FRAGMENTOLOGY 1(2018)

    Published December 2018, DOI: 10.24446/2nbp

    VOLUME PDF

    Printing instructions: For the most handsome print copy, we recommend that Fragmentology be printed on A4 or Letter paper, 2 pages per sheet.

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    The Syrian Foreign Ministry condemned what it said were illegal excavation works by US, French and Turkish troops as well as their local allies in areas of Syria under their control, including ancient sites at Manbij, Afrin, Idlib, Hasaka, and Raqqa. Credit: FARS News AgencySpeaking to the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA), a ministry official said that there had been an increase in excavation work, looting, and theft of ancient cultural...

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    December 11, 2018 17:00 - FITCH-WIENER LABS SEMINAR Dr. Edyta Marzec (Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Fitch Laboratory, British School at Athens)

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  • 12/11/18--11:31: Primer on Theosis
  • While the topic of theosis has grown in popularity among scholars, I regularly get awkward looks by students and family when the term arises. While my primary work has been in the area of theosis and the Bible, particularly theosis and the apostle Paul, I cut my teeth on the topic with my masters work on Maximus the Confessor.

    As a fruit of that work, I later co-authored a piece for the Ashgate Companion to Theological Anthropology with a friend Kris Miller. In our essay “Theosis and Theological Anthropology,” we explored theosis from a Christological perspective (via Maximus the Confessor) and a Trinitarian perspective (via T.F. Torrance). If you are looking for a primer on theosis, this essay would give you the key ideas that I think are relevant.


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    Another year, another launch of a Treasure report, more silly narrativisation of selected finds to shift attention away from the wider issues (Mark Brown (Arts correspondent), ' Forgotten statue kept in a margarine tub is 2,000-year-old treasure' Guardian Tue 11 Dec 2018)
    The British Museum on Tuesday revealed the details of 1,267 finds across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, more than there has ever been since the Treasure Act was passed in 1996.[...] About 78,000 archaeological objects, some of it treasure, were recorded in 2017 on a voluntary basis with the portable antiquities scheme. Metal de[te]ctorists found 93% of the items, with the biggest numbers in Norfolk, followed by Lincolnshire and Suffolk. Lewis said the rising figures were down to greater engagement between archaeologists and hobby detectorists, two communities which have not always got on. In the 1970s and 80s there was a campaign by some archaeologists to stop metal detecting. Lewis said:
    “There was a misunderstanding on both sides about what the other was up to. There was an idea that metal detecting was all about finding things for financial gain and ruining archaeology. Over the years it has been realised that there are a lot of people interested in the past, quite happy for the objects to go in to museums. We’re still on a journey, don’t get me wrong … it is very important that the right people are doing metal detecting.
    The finds by metal detectorists were welcomed by the heritage minister, Michael Ellis, who has announced a consultation on how the system could be improved.
    Mike Lewis tells only half the story, the concerns about collection driven exploitation of teh archaeological record were not all focussed on the monetary aspect, but the conservation issue - damage to the archaeological record by random hoiking of collectables with no proper recording of associations and context of deposition, and the artefacts ending up in scattered ephemeral personal collections without proper documentation. Those two problems have still not been solved, but Lewis skips around admitting that by simply ignoring the problem, turning his Bloomsbury back on it. That's the kind of dumbdown and under-informed public that gets you a Brexit.

    The fact that more and more Treasure found each year means only one thing (because we are constantly told that the "vast majority" of those engaged in Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Record are law abiding, so illegal non-reporting cannot be the explanation). It means that on the PAS watch the number of people going out there and searching sites for such objects (in their 'interest in the past') is quite rapidly increasing. That means the damage to the finite number of accessible sites is also increasing at the same rate, from year to year.

    Mr Lewis says these history-hunters are 'quite happy for the finds to go to museums'. He forgets two things, first of all the ultimate decision in the case of non-Treasure items is not that of the finders but the landowner's and theirs alone. Secondly in the case of Treasure it is clear that the only thing that makes collectors 'quite happy' to part with 'their' Treasures is in the (vast) majority of cases - whatever the Treasure Registrar may for some reason best known to himself pretend is the situation - is a ransom equal to its full market value.

    Mr Lewis seems not to have told the journalist how the PAS intends to fix it that with all the people coming into this hobby, only the 'right people' have access to the machines and land.