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Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs - http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

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    Estos días pasados ha soplado un huracán en el mar Jónico, un medicán (de Mediterraean hurricane), que ha afectado sobre todo al Peloponeso. Los griegos lo han llamado Zorbas, y aunque lo peor ya ha pasado, hay cuatro desaparecidos. La navegante y escritora Ana Capsir lo ha pasado en la marina de Kalamata, como menciona de pasada en una entrevista en Radio Exterior de España (minutos 09:40 a 26:45).


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    Hoy se cumplen exactamente diez años desde el 1 de octubre de 2008. Ese día cinco juramentados creamos —a la salida de una reunión de coordinación de las PAU, ¿cuándo si no?— un grupo de Google que abrimos a todos los profesores de clásicas de secundaria de Aragón. Nos guiaba la ilusión de rozarnos un poco y hacer cosas divertidas juntos. Lo llamamos Aragón Clásico en la estela de la web Extremadura Clásica del gran Carlos Cabanillas, y hoy lo formamos más de 100 profesores. Esto hay que mojarlo, por supuesto.


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    December 17, 2018 19.00 - LECTURE Ελπίδα Κοσμίδου, ΕΙΕ /ΤΕΡΑ -ΙΙΕ

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    December 17, 2018 7:00pm - LECTURE

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    Lucia Maddalena Tissi, Gli oracoli degli dèi greci nella Teosofia di Tubinga, Alessandria, 2018.

    Éditeur : Edizioni dell'Orso
    Collection : Hellenica 72
    XII-436 pages
    ISBN : 978-88-6274-848-3
    40 €

    Le présent ouvrage est consacré à l'étude critique des oracles des dieux grecs (« païens ») dans un recueil d'oracles, connu comme Théosophie, daté de la fin du Ve siècle de notre ère, et transmis en forme d'épitomé par le ms. Tub. Mb 27 (d'où son nom de Théosophie de Tübingen).
    Le livre est composé de sept chapitres. Le premier chapitre donne une introduction générale où plusieurs questions sont abordées (la structure, la datation, le contexte, les destinataires et les finalités de l'ouvrage). Cette analyse est suivie d'un aperçu critique sur les recueils oraculaires de l'antiquité tardive (ch. 2). Le troisième chapitre porte sur le contexte littéraire, poétique et philosophique de l'ouvrage et notamment sur les influences néoplatoniciennes. Les deux derniers chapitres (ch. 4 et 5) offrent une analyse de la prosodie et du style des textes oraculaires et de l'histoire de la tradition de ce recueil.

    Lire la suite...


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    vinea (f. pl. vineae)

    Literally a ‘vine arbour’, a wooden shed that formed part of a modular system for constructing covered walkways used by besiegers attacking a fortification. According to Vegetius, each was 8Rft (2.4m) wide, 16Rft (4.8m) long, and 7Rft (2.1m) high, with a roof covered in planking and sides in wattlework, an untanned leather or patchwork outer layer rendering the whole fireproof. Plaut., Mil. 2.2.113; Caes., BG 2.12.3; Veg., DRM 4.15. [Campbell 2003]


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    vitis (f. pl. vites)

    14003195852_6f4da13e05Carried as a badge of office by a centurio and made of vine wood. One man, Lucilius, famously breaking them whilst administering corporal punishment, was nicknamed ‘Broke Another’ (cedo alteram) according to Tacitus. Plin., NH 14.1.3; 19; Tac., Ann. 1.23; Luc. 6.146; Juv. 8.247. [Goldsworthy 2003]


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    xynema (Celt.)

    Part of the hippika gymnasia involving throwing javelins whilst changing course on horseback (Arr., Tech. Tak. 42). [Hyland 1993]


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    The "Change.org" webpage gives you the opportunity to see the names of some of those who have signed the petition 'Bring fair metal detecting laws to Sweden' that now has more than 1K supporters and an interesting free comment box where signatories can give their 'Reasons for signing'. It's an eyeopener.

    The first thing that one notes is the small numbers of people with Scandinavian-sounding names and writing in Swedish. Let's note the odd fact that the petition itself is written in English - so obviously they are counting on brotherly help from foreigners. Note also the verb of the title of the petition, 'bring'. Bring from outside, and bring from you-know-where. As Britain slinks off from having any meaningful position in Europe in March next year, perhaps this will - to its shame - be the only place where Britain has any influence at all in the world, poisoning the heritage debate with the unreflexive narrow object centric view of many of its archaeologists.

    So there's a Russian, at least two Danes, a Pole (Igor Murawski, settled in Britain), Mr Nolan from Ireland and lots of Brits. The latter dominate the comments. This means that rather than getting an insight into what Swedish tekkies think, we see rather the standards of adult literacy that the British education system is turning out which manifests itself in the number of people commenting who cannot manage much more than an "OK", one gives his email address as a comment. One thing is clear, very few of the people signing have actually read much of the explanatory text accompanying the petition, a number of people are writing as though they think (despite what they've just been told) that 'metal detecting' is forbidden in Sweden.

    Others stress how 'healthy' the hobby is (a mental throwback to DIG and NCMD propaganda from the 1980s and early 90s). Many of them stress how they are 'rescuing artefacts' from: the weather, fertilisers, bulldozers and building, the plough, and other artefact hunters. None of them mention documenting the context, the loss of which turns archaeological evidence into a loose decontextualised collectable. And that is interesting that the two archaeologists I spotted commenting (no PAS FLOs among them, yet) do not mention it either. They come from the 'other' archaeology. The first to comment was Martin Rundkvist of Umeå university in Sweden.
    Martin Rundkvist 7 days ago
    The current rules are dysfunctional and based on faulty assumptions. As an archaeological research scholar, I want rules that allow Sweden's law-abiding hobbyists to contribute freely to the knowledge of our country's past, while on the other hand keeping our heritage safe from agricultural erosion and nighthawk crooks.
    He sees a permit system as based on 'faulty assumptions', the same ones that underlie the 1992  European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage and sees blind artefact hoiking as a way of 'keeping [objects] safe from agricultural erosion and nighthawk crooks'. He represents 'our heritage' however as the objects that artefact hunters hoik out, because context is destroyed by ploughing and nocturnal diggings by looters whether or not they come home with something in their pocket or not. Simply illogical and failing to address the main issue with Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Record.  This was followed a day later by remarks by one of the Ixelles Six/Helsinki Gang, Andres Dobat of Aarhus University:
    Andres Dobat 6 days ago
    Responsible metal detectecting is just another way of entering into a dialogue with the past. @Riksantikvarie: Don't build fences. Educate and facilitate instead.
    Relativising Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Record as 'just (sic) another way of entering into a dialogue with the past' is not terribly helpful. The two people that scaled the pyramids the other day to pose naked and engage in simulated sex acts there (also Danes) seem to me could also be argued as as 'just another way of entering into a dialogue with the past' and no doubt the symmetrists would say 'why not' allow anyone else just to climb the pyramid to do what they want there? Facilitate, Dr Dobat? Likewise people that find images left by previous inhabitants of the territory they now occupy offensive should surely, Mr Dobat, not be castigated for 'entering into a dialogue with the past' with a sledgehammer and explosives. But then Dr Dobat brazenly recently added his name and reputation to the object-centred assertion that pilfering archaeological evidence from sites with metal detectors and spades is not a form of damage ("In order to be considered 'cultural damage', a find and/or its associated information would have to be irretrievably lost."). I think he is totally wrong on that when we are talking about any form of  Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Record.

    Yes, we need to educate and facilitate, but instead of going along with the easiest option (shoulder shrugging about knowledge theft due to Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Record  as most supporters of relic collecting are doing) we need to facilitate other, more helpful, ways by which the public can start entering into a dialogue with the past.

    In Britain there used to be an amateur archaeology that was based on amateur landscape survey, earthwork surveys, hedgerow species counting, mapping, recording standing buildings, collecting oral history in their neighbourhood. Totally benign, useful, non-intrusive and non-destructive. The PAS has in effect basically destroyed that in the UK and now the English disease is spreading.



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    Review of Stefan Schorn, Studien zur hellenistischen Biographie und Historiographie. Beiträge zur Altertumskunde, Band 345. Berlin: 2018. Pp. xiv, 509. €119,95. ISBN 9783110447552.

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    Review of Elena Franchi, Giorgia Proietti, Conflict in Communities: Forward-Looking Memories in Classical Athens. Trento: 2017. Pp. 302. €12,00. ISBN 9788884437716.

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    Review of Paul McKechnie, Jennifer Cromwell, Ptolemy I and the Transformation of Egypt, 404-282 BCE. Mnemosyne supplements. History and archaeology of classical antiquity, 415. Leiden; Boston: 2018. Pp. x, 247. €110,00. ISBN 9789004366961.

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    Review of Elena Giusti, Carthage in Virgil's 'Aeneid': Staging the Enemy under Augustus. Cambridge classical studies. Cambridge; New York: 2018. Pp. xiv, 334. £75.00. ISBN 9781108416801.

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    Vance Morgan wrote a while back: Those who are obsessed, as I am, with questions about what is greater than us often assume that the most important question is “Does God exist?” I submit that an even more problematic question is “What if God does exist, but has character traits entirely different from those we […]

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    Festive greetings from the Ancient History Hound podcast. He writes it, I read it.


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    Podcast 8.1: A Cultural History of Satan – Predecessors of Satan from Mesopotamia (Download).


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